Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Chocolate Question


Kim Shook
 Share

Recommended Posts

Quick question. I have a cupcake recipe that calls for using melted semi-sweet chocolate as a dip for a mound of creamy filling that is piled on top of the cupcake (think of those dipped cones at Dairy Queen). Can I use a bar of good dark chocolate instead of the semi sweet? What % is semi sweet anyway? How 'dark' is it? Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use a 58% dark chocolate that its sold under semisweet.I dont know the specific % to call a chocolate semisweet or bittersweet ( the other one I use its a extra dark bittersweet 72%),most of the chocolate I have seen under semisweet its under 60% cocoa, but it might not be the parameter to classify semisweet and bittersweet .

Vanessa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quick question.  I have a cupcake recipe that calls for using melted semi-sweet chocolate as a dip for a mound of creamy filling that is piled on top of the cupcake (think of those dipped cones at Dairy Queen).  Can I use a bar of good dark chocolate instead of the semi sweet?  What % is semi sweet anyway?  How 'dark' is it?  Thanks!

I know that cupcake! First ones gone at any place I take them -- and mine are BIG! No problem using a good dark bar.

I read some place that there is no official distinction between semisweet and bittersweet but that generally under 60% is semisweet. Let taste be your guide, especially since that "mound of creamy filling" is VERY sweet.

Cheryl, The Sweet Side
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quick question.  I have a cupcake recipe that calls for using melted semi-sweet chocolate as a dip for a mound of creamy filling that is piled on top of the cupcake (think of those dipped cones at Dairy Queen).  Can I use a bar of good dark chocolate instead of the semi sweet?  What % is semi sweet anyway?  How 'dark' is it?  Thanks!

I know that cupcake! First ones gone at any place I take them -- and mine are BIG! No problem using a good dark bar.

I read some place that there is no official distinction between semisweet and bittersweet but that generally under 60% is semisweet. Let taste be your guide, especially since that "mound of creamy filling" is VERY sweet.

This is correct. There is no official definition of semi vs. bittersweet. Would you share the cupcake recipe? :smile:

Ilene

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is also no official definition of "dark chocolate," though it is often used as a synonym for bittersweet chocolate, except by Hershey's, who make a dark chocolate that is about 50% sugar.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, please share the recipe. I have lots of semi-couverture chips to use. School starts next week, and the boys are having last week sleepovers with friends. We have 4-5 boys over here at once and they'd love it if I made some cupcakes....especially chocolate ones.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

“Dark Chocolate” is any chocolate that has no milk i.e. semi-sweet or bittersweet. If a recipe calls for “dark chocolate,” choose semi-sweet if you like a sweeter result or bittersweet if you like things more amer.

More and more these days, you are seeing recipes that specify the percentage of cocoa in the chocolate. Obviously, the more information present will allow you to come closer to the end result that the author intended. Just let the recipe be a guide rather than something carved in stone.

Edited by John DePaula (log)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

“Dark Chocolate” is any chocolate that has no milk i.e. semi-sweet or bittersweet.

I see. In that case, Hershey's Special Dark is not dark chocolate at all -- it lists milk, milk fat, and lactose as ingredients. Suprise, suprise. Maybe that's why Hershey's descibes it as a "less sweet" chocolate instead of a "dark chocolate."

ETA: FWIW, according to this article, there is no FDA standard of identity for dark chocolate. So while most chocophiles might consider that dark chocolate means any chocolate without milk, that doesn't appear to be a universally understood definition. Certainly in my own every day experience, a lot of people seem to think that "dark" means "less sweet" or "higher cacao," irrespecive of milk content.

Edited by Patrick S (log)

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

“Dark Chocolate” is any chocolate that has no milk i.e. semi-sweet or bittersweet.

I see. In that case, Hershey's Special Dark is not dark chocolate at all -- it lists milk, milk fat, and lactose as ingredients. Suprise, suprise. Maybe that's why Hershey's descibes it as a "less sweet" chocolate instead of a "dark chocolate."

ETA: FWIW, according to this article, there is no FDA standard of identity for dark chocolate. So while most chocophiles might consider that dark chocolate means any chocolate without milk, that doesn't appear to be a universally understood definition. Certainly in my own every day experience, a lot of people seem to think that "dark" means "less sweet" or "higher cacao," irrespecive of milk content.

Thanks so much for that article, Patrick. VERY interesting! I hadn’t seen that before but it doesn’t surprise me that the U.S. hasn’t a legal distinction between semisweet and bittersweet chocolate. I think that the EU in general, and maybe the French in particular, are much better about legally defining these things so that the consumer knows what s/he is getting.

It’s a minor departure from the article (it’s too trivial to call it a disagreement), but I think that bittersweet starts at 70%. In fact, if you look at online sales they seem to draw the line there, too. In other words, 70% is bittersweet. FWIW.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't vouch for the recipe, but it is an Elinor Klivans recipe.  I am making it on Friday for a dinner party (White Russian Cupcakes for the grown-ups and these for the kids).  Here is a link to the recipe.

I've made this in her book Cupcakes! and the cake is good, but if you have a favorite chocolate cupcake, you can use that. I wouldn't rave about the cake itself. What is really good is the "hi top" part. Just the idea is fun. And, for a surprise, I colored the inside team colors instead of white when I did them for my daughters swim team.

Cheryl, The Sweet Side
Link to comment
Share on other sites

“Dark Chocolate” is any chocolate that has no milk i.e. semi-sweet or bittersweet.

I see. In that case, Hershey's Special Dark is not dark chocolate at all -- it lists milk, milk fat, and lactose as ingredients. Suprise, suprise. Maybe that's why Hershey's descibes it as a "less sweet" chocolate instead of a "dark chocolate."

ETA: FWIW, according to this article, there is no FDA standard of identity for dark chocolate. So while most chocophiles might consider that dark chocolate means any chocolate without milk, that doesn't appear to be a universally understood definition. Certainly in my own every day experience, a lot of people seem to think that "dark" means "less sweet" or "higher cacao," irrespecive of milk content.

Ghirardelli semi-sweet also contains milk fat.

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ghirardelli semi-sweet also contains milk fat.

A lot of semi-sweet chocolate brands contain milk fat. My sister had to stop using most commercial brands of chocolate chips because she's highly allergic to milk.

The chocolate manufacturers changed the formulas to substitute milk fat (butterfat) for cocoa butter, we've theorized because it's less expensive.

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ghirardelli semi-sweet also contains milk fat.

The chocolate manufacturers changed the formulas to substitute milk fat (butterfat) for cocoa butter, we've theorized because it's less expensive.

Suzy,

I think you're exactly right about that. Funny story... a few years ago while living in Paris, I was eager to try out all of the chocolate shops. On one of my trips, I picked up a few pieces from Jeff de Bruges and then headed to my local boulangerie for a baguette, where they also had a small amount of house-made chocolates. The vendeuse behind the counter spied my bag and gave me a knowing, yet disapproving, look: "You know, of course, that they use BUTTER in place of cocoa butter, right?" Well, no I did not know! :blink:

So anyway, someone in the know may be able to supply details about what is/isn't legal in the EU or France or Belgium.

Since more people are reading labels these days, I'd say stay away from any "dark chocolate" that has milk products or, heaven forbid, palm oil or any other fat besides cocoa butter.

You've got so many good alternatives out there if you just pay attention.

Remember: Life's too short for bad chocolate! :biggrin:

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By KTM
      Hello friends,
       
      We recently got our selmi plus ex and have had a handful of successful runs. So far mostly with our enrobing line. 
       
      Theres been 2 occasions now that I have noticed when tempering the machine is cooling past the target temp. When it does this it goes down into the 28c range and the screw pump has to shut off due to the temp and viscosity. 
       
      I also noticed the manual is pretty light on operational procedures. 
       
      The 2 things I can think of that might be causing this other then an equipment error is 
      the chocolate used is to thick or there is a build up of chocolate around the temperature probe near the faucet. 
       
      Wondering if anyone else has had this issue before. 
    • By ShylahSinger
      Hello! I'm fairly new to this site so I don't know if my search was weak. I'm trying to find a way to make Mandarin orange puree at home, but I couldn't find anything even similar in the forum. I am a home cook, but I have been making chocolate bonbons and other confections for over 4 years (intermitantly). It is too expensive for me to purchase this online- not because of the price of the puree, but the cost of shipping makes it prohibative. The recipes I've seen online are all differant and don't seem to be what I need. 
      I would love any help with this! I look forward to hearing and learning from those who have much, much more experience than me. Thanks!
    • By Darienne
      A quite unusual take on the favorite American chocolate bar: click
    • By ShylahSinger
      Help! I am an amateur and make chocolate truffles, bonbons, and caramels for friends and family. I made some soft caramel for filling molded bonbons. The flavor and consistency are fine, but the caramel is filled with bubbles. I don't know how to get the air bubbles out, and am concerned using it in my molded chocolates. I would like to know if it is okay to use. I have been making confections for about four years and this is the first time this has happened. I would really appreciate any help! I'm new to the forum and don't know anyone yet.
    • By rookie
      I am making molded bunnies for Easter and I am finding that the
      necks are cracking and the head breaks away from the body. I have noticed that the neck is not as thick as the rest of the bunny. Total grams for this bunny is 200.
      Does anyone have any suggestions on how to rectify this? Oh yeah I didn't mention that after pouring into molds I place in the refridgerator.
      Any suggestions are welcome!
      Cheers
      Mary - Rookie
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...