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bluestem: The new and improved - Kansas City


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.... obviously... thanks, moosnsqrl, that was all very informative.  :hmmm:

For those of you who are curious, I Googled "taccozette" (and other spelling variations) and was only able to dredge up a food blog, Mamma ho fame!, by some Japanese woman dedicated to cooking all things Italian (go figure).  Since I don't have the script enabled on my computer, I was only all too lucky that:

1. She had a picture of the pasta, and

2. The picture was labelled.

So, there you go.  :wink:

Exactly what I wanted you to appreciate . . . even after I de-Colby-ized the spelling ( :wink:) I was able to find little - and conflicting - information on taccozzette. It's an Abruzzese thing. 'Nuff said. :wink:

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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.... obviously... thanks, moosnsqrl, that was all very informative.   :hmmm:

For those of you who are curious, I Googled "taccozette" (and other spelling variations) and was only able to dredge up a food blog, Mamma ho fame!, by some Japanese woman dedicated to cooking all things Italian (go figure).  Since I don't have the script enabled on my computer, I was only all too lucky that:

1. She had a picture of the pasta, and

2. The picture was labelled.

So, there you go.   :wink:

Exactly what I wanted you to appreciate . . . even after I de-Colby-ized the spelling ( :wink:) I was able to find little - and conflicting - information on taccozzette. It's an Abruzzese thing. 'Nuff said. :wink:

Oh, leave Colby's spelling alone. I give him enough grief (he can certainly attest to that). At least he's not "depolorably" bad, like you know who. :cool:

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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I Googled "taccozette" (and other spelling variations) and was only able to dredge up a food blog, Mamma ho fame!, by some Japanese woman dedicated to cooking all things Italian (go figure).  Since I don't have the script enabled on my computer, I was only all too lucky that:

1. She had a picture of the pasta, and

2. The picture was labelled.

So, there you go.  :wink:

What an interesting blog, though, and we would never have found it if I had just spoon-fed you a picture of the pasta (pun intended). Give a man a fish and he'll eat for a day; teach a man to fish and he'll sit in a boat and drink beer all day. :laugh:

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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  • 1 month later...

I made good on this thread's subtitle and had my caviar and my wagyu at bluestem. A few other foodie friends and I descended upon bluestem to ravish the plates and satiate our need for good food. We did the 7-course.

All of the courses were strong - but the stand-outs were the caviar course (as always) and the wagyu tartare.

"Oyster stew" was probably the most challenging course in terms of complexity and appreciation. I like my oysters slurped from the shell. These were out of the shell but raw. A warm creamy celery root soup was poured over them at the table. What I loved about this course was that the soup warmed the oysters without cooking them - accentuating both the flavor and the satiny texture of the silky shellfish.

My one complaint was that the fidua pasta that came with the escargot was way undercooked. Otherwise, it was flavorful and the escargot were plump, succulent and clean-tasting.

I had a wonderful cheese as well - "Ewe-F-O" from the good people at Cypress Grove. I don't think there's a single cheese they've made that I haven't liked. This one was very funky - a little ripe? :raz:

You can read about the dinner and my thoughts on the restaurant on my blog.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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A friend in town from NYC and I had a great brunch at bluestem yesterday. He is the least decisive person I have ever known, so I was relieved that both of our shortlists included the croque madame and the scallops; we ordered both and agreed to share.

I don't think I've ever left this restaurant without having a scallop dish because they seem to have unlocked the secret to cooking them perfectly. This treatment was no exception. Accompanied by cipollini, funghi, poached eggs and truffles, they were delicious.

And the croque madame (or, as we were calling it down the stretch, the 'croak') was the most decadent version I've ever had. Not that we minded. I'm not sure there was any room for added richness anywhere in the sandwich but the egg topping (which surprised me as I was thinking Monsieur rather than Madame) and duck-fat frites served to throw the needle on the health-o-meter into the red. Had the roads been less treacherous I might have feared for my health but I was fairly certain the drive home would be fatal anyway, so I ate with reckless abandon.

My companion mentioned several times how pleasant the atmosphere was, as opposed to other buffet-style, over-the-top affairs that seem to be the norm for brunches in these parts. I have to agree; a more civilized and relaxing experience all the way around. If only they delivered!

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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And the croque madame (or, as we were calling it down the stretch, the 'croak') was the most decadent version I've ever had.  Not that we minded.  I'm not sure there was any room for added richness anywhere in the sandwich but the egg topping (which surprised me as I was thinking Monsieur rather than Madame) and duck-fat frites served to throw the needle on the health-o-meter into the red.  Had the roads been less treacherous I might have feared for my health but I was fairly certain the drive home would be fatal anyway, so I ate with reckless abandon.

moosnsqrl: What? A grilled cheese smothered in Bechamel and topped with two fried eggs AND sided by duck-fat frites doesn't stay within most people's new year's resolutions diet?! :laugh:

If I may ask, how much were them scallops? One of the things that impresses me the most about bluestem's brunch is that the prices are so damn affordable.

Edited by ulterior epicure (log)

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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And the croque madame (or, as we were calling it down the stretch, the 'croak') was the most decadent version I've ever had.  Not that we minded.  I'm not sure there was any room for added richness anywhere in the sandwich but the egg topping (which surprised me as I was thinking Monsieur rather than Madame) and duck-fat frites served to throw the needle on the health-o-meter into the red.  Had the roads been less treacherous I might have feared for my health but I was fairly certain the drive home would be fatal anyway, so I ate with reckless abandon.

moosnsqrl: What? A grilled cheese smothered in Bechamel and topped with two fried eggs AND sided by duck-fat frites doesn't stay within most people's new year's resolutions diet?! :laugh:

If I may ask, how much were them scallops? One of the things that impresses me the most about bluestem's brunch is that the prices are so damn affordable.

And you're forgetting the prosciutto (or San Daniele or?). A formidable dish, indeed.

Them scallops [sic] were $13-15, I think. Yes, incredible value considering the quality of ingredients, to say nothing of the difficulty of getting chefs up and about on a Sunday morning.

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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Them scallops [sic]...
Are you making fun of my Midwest accent? :raz:

We don't have accents here in the the midwest -- that's why they send TV journalists here to "learn" to speak un-accented US English.

And there is a difference between bad grammar and an accent.

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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  • 2 weeks later...

My meal from the new and improved brunch menu which just recently began on the 21st was superb.

Everyone deserves to have this before they die...if not, you'll atleast get a heart attack from it.

Imagine lucious and creamy Anson Mills Grits spooned on the plate with slices of Corn Meal Breaded Berkshire Pork fried to a crisp resting on top. Then think about perfectly fried sunny side campo lindo farm eggs and not too thick and not too runny sausage gravy drapped on top. Every bite delivered to the last savor.

"cuisine is the greatest form of art to touch a human's instinct" - chairman kaga

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My meal from the new and improved brunch menu which just recently began on the 21st was superb.

Everyone deserves to have this before they die...if not, you'll atleast get a heart attack from it.

Imagine lucious and creamy Anson Mills Grits spooned on the plate with slices of Corn Meal Breaded Berkshire Pork fried to a crisp resting on top. Then think about perfectly fried sunny side campo lindo farm eggs and not too thick and not too runny sausage gravy drapped on top. Every bite delivered to the last savor.

A Carolinian friend was singing the praises of the grits last week. I've never happened to have anything that was served with them but I guess I will have to make a point of doing so on my next outing.

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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My meal from the new and improved brunch menu which just recently began on the 21st was superb.

Everyone deserves to have this before they die...if not, you'll atleast get a heart attack from it.

Imagine lucious and creamy Anson Mills Grits spooned on the plate with slices of Corn Meal Breaded Berkshire Pork fried to a crisp resting on top. Then think about perfectly fried sunny side campo lindo farm eggs and not too thick and not too runny sausage gravy drapped on top. Every bite delivered to the last savor.

I had the same on Sunday for brunch. It was the best brunch dish ever. That says it all.

It is easier to change a menu than a growing season.

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So tell me. What is the allure of Anson Mills products over others? I've had AM grits numerous times at many (usually very high-end) restaurants (locally, bluestem, 40 Sardines, and The American come to mind) - and it always seem more like mush or porridge rather than grits... it's almost like a creamy puree... not as grainy as grits that I'm used to... but then again, I'm from MO, not the Carolinas. Is it simply just a matter of taste and upbringing? Is that creaminess that I describe about AM grits the *key*?

Inquiring stomachs want to know.

edited to add: I should note that it's not that I dislike AM grits, it's just not as "stiff" as I am used to - my comment is just more of a side-note; not necessarily a comment as to my preferences.

Edited by ulterior epicure (log)

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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  • 1 month later...
So, brunch at Bluestem on Sundays.  Does one dare bring a younger child...?

Absolutely. We were there a few weeks back with our boys age 3 and 5. Stopped in for brunch at blustem a couple weeks ago and was very impressed.

My wife got a Croque Madame, a ridiculously huge fried ham and cheese sandwich, topped with Mornay sauce and a fried egg. A terrific cholesterol-bomb of a sandwich, complemented by some pretty tasty frites. I don’t understand how someone could actually eat this entire plate of food. I was full just watching her eat half of it. Really a delicious sandwich, though.

I ordered conservatively, the bluestem breakfast. My first choice was the mussels (Anthony Bourdain be damned, ordering mussels for Sunday brunch), but they were out. My first choice actually would have been the aforementioned scallop dish, but for a scallop allergy. So I settled on scrambled eggs, ham, corn muffin, and sausage gravy. This was an excellently prepared breakfast also, not quite on par with my first breakfast at RJ’s (which I haven't posted on yet, but damn it was a standard bearer) but very well done all the same.

Bluestem is the not necessarily the kind of place I’d go for a comfort food breakfast, but it’s admirable that the kitchen treats the old breakfast stand-bys with such respect.

My friend Ramiro got fried rock shrimp, which was a nice surprise for a brunch menu. Also served with frites. Very nice.

The two boys though, scored the real coup, the French toast. Wow! This was some killer French toast. An inch+ thick (and dense) slice of brioche (“Texas toast”) that seemed soaked through like bread pudding. It was served with a killer blueberry sauce and a visually appealing egg-shaped dollop of whipped cream that actually stood somewhere on a continuum between whipped cream and butter. Really terrific. I was glad we had kids in tow.

My biggest surprise, however, was not the food quality, which I expected to be quite good. What I couldn’t believe, was that the place wasn’t full for brunch, with an overflow crowd waiting in the bar area. And this wasn’t some early meal…I think we got there between 12:30 and 1:00. All of Westport was D-E-A-D dead. Are all the brunchers at a First Watch in Johnson County? WHERE ARE ALL THE PEOPLE?

Sorry, still adjusting to a somewhat different lifestyle. Yes, the prices are $3-4 more per person than First Watch, but for food executed this well, a unique environment, and supporting a one-off local establishment, I found bluestem an excellent brunch destination.

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My biggest surprise, however, was not the food quality, which I expected to be quite good.  What I couldn’t believe, was that the place wasn’t full for brunch, with an overflow crowd waiting in the bar area.  And this wasn’t some early meal…I think we got there between 12:30 and 1:00.  All of Westport was D-E-A-D dead.  Are all the brunchers at a First Watch in Johnson County?  WHERE ARE ALL THE PEOPLE?

Hey, hey, hey, HUSH, willya? With all this gushing, you're liable to attract all those hordes you fear. Sheesh, ruin a good thing for the rest of us, why don't you?! :raz:

Glad to hear that you've enjoyed brunch. Chef Crum does an excellent job there - all the time, but particularly on Sundays.

Edited for misspelling.

Edited by ulterior epicure (log)

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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With all this gushing, you're liable to attract all those hoards you fear.  Sheesh, ruin a good thing for the rest of us, why don't you?!

Fear? Bring on the hordes. I'm just looking for signs of life. Took the opportunity of an ultrasound visit today at St. Luke's South to try SPIN! Neapoliatan Pizza (demerits for all caps AND punctuation in the name).

I thought the pizza was okay (best in town so far, but that's another story), but you know, at least the place was buzzing. Almost all the tables were full, there was a bit of liveliness in the air. Westport at Sunday brunch was a ghost town. It was kind of depressing. The food, thankfully, lifted my spirits.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Aaron,

You'll be pleased to hear that bluestem was fairly bustling this Sunday. We arrived at 10:30 (having erroneously thought they opened at 10 and we were giving them some time to awaken) and a steady stream of tables arrived after, including [and I always think this is telling] two well-known area chefs, dining with their families.

We enjoyed w-a-y too much food including frites, french toast, bluestem breakfasts (2) and benedictes (2). I have come to expect well-executed high-end dinners there but I and my guests were impressed that the kitchen showed it is equally at home preparing decidedly non-fussy breakfast favorites.

A card in our cheque wallet indicates they are serving ala carte Easter brunch next week 10:30 - 2:30. If you haven't made plans for your holiday meal it's definitely something to consider.

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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A card in our cheque wallet indicates they are serving ala carte Easter brunch next week 10:30 - 2:30.  If you haven't made plans for your holiday meal it's definitely something to consider.

Excellent! I've been considering it specifically at my wife's request this afternoon, and had just meant to check if it was offered. Thanks!

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A card in our cheque wallet indicates they are serving ala carte Easter brunch next week 10:30 - 2:30.  If you haven't made plans for your holiday meal it's definitely something to consider.

Excellent! I've been considering it specifically at my wife's request this afternoon, and had just meant to check if it was offered. Thanks!

I should've mentioned that reservations are strongly recommended.

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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  • 2 weeks later...

I took my best friend Sam to Bluestem last for my birthday, and I've been wanting to rave about it, but my coworkers would just look at me like I was crazy, so I hope it's ok to rave here. (Please don't laugh at me!)

Neither of had been before, so we decided to jump right in with both feet. We did the 12 course with wine pairings. I asked how the wine pairings worked, since I don't eat at this level very often, and was surprised that wine would be paired with all 12 courses. The sommelier made some really excellent selections.

Here's what we ate, and forgive me because I wasn't taking notes, I may have gotten the order wrong.

Amuse - carrot juice with cucumber foam.

Oyster, smoked trout, salmon roe. We ate this as one bite and then just kind of looked at each other in silence. Very intense flavors, especially after the mild spring taste of the amuse. It took me a minute to decide that it was delicious. I guess that's what people mean when they describe a dish as challenging.

Crab cake, with cucumber jello. The crab had Asian/sushi flavors, and the cucumber jello was brilliant. Sam said he doesn't like cucumbers, but the flavor here, in a friendlier texture was really nice.

Escargot - oyster(?) mushrooms, pine nuts. Warm, clean pesto flavors. I've only ever had escargot that reminded me of a piece of rubber swimming in garlic butter, so eating it this way was nice.

Foie gras tourchon. My first time eating foie. I now understand what all the fuss is about. Sam had eaten it before, but when I asked him what it tasted like, he said it doesn't take like anything else, it just tastes like foie gras. I hope I don't sound like a rube when I say this was the single best thing I've ever put in my mouth. The Canadian ice wine was a great pairing.

Asparagus soup served over whipped ricotta, prosciutto, and olive oil. I wanted to lick the bowl.

Seafood pasta in tomato sauce with fresh oregano. This was the only dish I didn't really like. It was served in a mini fishbowl, which I thought was a cool presentation, but it hindered actually eating it. The shrimp still had the tail on, and it was akward getting a knife and fork in to the bowl to eat it. I also think the shrimp was a little overcooked. It tasted good, so I think maybe it only suffered in comparison. This had probably the most interesting wine pairing - a very yeasty champagne that Sam said was like drinking bread. And the pairing was sort of like having a crusty bread to mop up the tomato sauce with.

Scallop. I'm not sure I can recall what came with this, because the scallop was just perfect. Crisp seared crust, absolutely silky inside. I wanted to eat a dozen of them.

Deconstructed paella - seared whitefish, sausage foam. This turned the savory way up. A nicely soft pinot here.

Waygu fillet, whipped smoked potatoes, tomato jam, blue cheese crisp, grainy mustard sauce. This was about the time we just started sighing with pleasure. A big California cabernet-sauvignon for this and the next course.

Lamb 2 ways, tiny spring vegetables, honey jasmine sauce. More sighs. That honey sauce was perfect.

Cheese course - goat cheese, spiced nuts, almond bread. Earlier my friend had asked the sommelier what else would be good paired with the ice wine. So he brought that back here. It was fun to see the wine take a totally different character against the cheese versus the foie.

Dessert - chocolate souffle cake, Kalua ice cream. Tawny port pairing. Smiles and sighs from both of us.

Champagne float. This was the other near-miss. Taken as a single drink, this was a little too much at this point - too cold, too bubbly. Instead of this I would have loved a tiny espresso shot.

Petit-fours - lavender chocolate truffle, caramel. This was good. The bitterness of the truffle actually provided that coffee note that I love with dessert.

We stumbled out of the restaurant afterwards, both of us sort of breathless and flushed, probably from all the wine. OK, it was really from having eaten the best meal either of us had ever had.

Go and do this if you haven't already! We're lucky to have a restaurant of this caliber in Kansas City. I can't wait to go for brunch.

"Nothing you could cook will ever be as good as the $2.99 all-you-can-eat pizza buffet." - my EX (wonder why he's an ex?)

My eGfoodblog: My corner of the Midwest

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dividend, can I be your best friend too?

Welcome to the bluestem groupies. Be careful, it's a habit-forming relationship.

Glad to hear you had a good meal there!

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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I took my best friend Sam to Bluestem last for my birthday, and I've been wanting to rave about it, but my coworkers would just look at me like I was crazy, so I hope it's ok to rave here.  (Please don't laugh at me!)

Neither of had been before, so we decided to jump right in with both feet.  We did the 12 course with wine pairings.  I asked how the wine pairings worked, since I don't eat at this level very often, and was surprised that  wine would be paired with all 12 courses.  The sommelier made some really excellent selections. 

Here's what we ate, and forgive me because I wasn't taking notes, I may have gotten the order wrong. 

Amuse - carrot juice with cucumber foam. 

Oyster, smoked trout, salmon roe.  We ate this as one bite and then just kind of looked at each other in silence.  Very intense flavors, especially after the mild spring taste of the amuse.  It took me a minute to decide that it was delicious.  I guess that's what people mean when they describe a dish as challenging.

Crab cake, with cucumber jello.  The crab had Asian/sushi flavors, and the cucumber jello was brilliant.  Sam said he doesn't like cucumbers, but the flavor here, in a friendlier texture was really nice. 

Escargot - oyster(?) mushrooms, pine nuts.  Warm, clean pesto flavors.  I've only ever had escargot that reminded me of a piece of rubber swimming in garlic butter, so eating it this way was nice. 

Foie gras tourchon.  My first time eating foie.  I now understand what all the fuss is about.  Sam had eaten it before, but when I asked him what it tasted like, he said it doesn't take like anything else, it just tastes like foie gras.  I hope I don't sound like a rube when I say this was the single best thing I've ever put in my mouth.  The Canadian ice wine was a great pairing. 

Asparagus soup served over whipped ricotta, prosciutto, and olive oil.  I wanted to lick the bowl. 

Seafood pasta in tomato sauce with fresh oregano.  This was the only dish I didn't really like.  It was served in a mini fishbowl, which I thought was a cool presentation, but it hindered actually eating it.  The shrimp still had the tail on, and it was akward getting a knife and fork in to the bowl to eat it.  I also think the shrimp was a little overcooked.  It tasted good, so I think maybe it only suffered in comparison.  This had probably the most interesting wine pairing - a very yeasty champagne that Sam said was like drinking bread.  And the pairing was sort of like having a crusty bread to mop up the tomato sauce with. 

Scallop.  I'm not sure I can recall what came with this, because the scallop was just perfect.  Crisp seared crust, absolutely silky inside.  I wanted to eat a dozen of them. 

Deconstructed paella - seared whitefish, sausage foam.  This turned the savory way up.  A nicely soft pinot here.

Waygu fillet, whipped smoked potatoes, tomato jam, blue cheese crisp, grainy mustard sauce.  This was about the time we just started sighing with pleasure.  A big California cabernet-sauvignon for this and the next course. 

Lamb 2 ways, tiny spring vegetables, honey jasmine sauce.  More sighs.  That honey sauce was perfect.

Cheese course - goat cheese, spiced nuts, almond bread.  Earlier my friend had asked the sommelier what else would be good paired with the ice wine.  So he brought that back here.  It was fun to see the wine take a totally different character against the cheese versus the foie.

Dessert - chocolate souffle cake, Kalua ice cream.  Tawny port pairing.  Smiles and sighs from both of us.

Champagne float.  This was the other near-miss.  Taken as a single drink, this was a little too much at this point - too cold, too bubbly.  Instead of this I would have loved a tiny espresso shot. 

Petit-fours - lavender chocolate truffle, caramel.  This was good.  The bitterness of the truffle actually provided that coffee note that I love with dessert.

We stumbled out of the restaurant afterwards, both of us sort of breathless and flushed, probably from all the wine.  OK, it was really from having eaten the best meal either of us had ever had. 

Go and do this if you haven't already!  We're lucky to have a restaurant of this caliber in Kansas City.  I can't wait to go for brunch.

Sounds like an amazing meal, do you remember what went with the Foie?

"cuisine is the greatest form of art to touch a human's instinct" - chairman kaga

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dividend, can I be your best friend too? 

Welcome to the bluestem groupies.  Be careful, it's a habit-forming relationship. 

Glad to hear you had a good meal there!

Hi dividend, can I join you all for a meal. I have been known to drive up to KC from Tulsa just to have dinner at Bluestem. And my buddy from Bartlesville also thinks it is the best place in town. Next thing you know you will be reaching the point where you say, " cost be damned, I have to taste that fois gras again". I do. I will be having myself a brunch the next time I am up in May. I can salivate at the thought.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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I took my best friend Sam to Bluestem last for my birthday, and I've been wanting to rave about it, but my coworkers would just look at me like I was crazy, so I hope it's ok to rave here.  (Please don't laugh at me!)

Neither of had been before, so we decided to jump right in with both feet.  We did the 12 course with wine pairings.  I asked how the wine pairings worked, since I don't eat at this level very often, and was surprised that  wine would be paired with all 12 courses.  The sommelier made some really excellent selections. 

Here's what we ate, and forgive me because I wasn't taking notes, I may have gotten the order wrong. 

Amuse - carrot juice with cucumber foam. 

Oyster, smoked trout, salmon roe.  We ate this as one bite and then just kind of looked at each other in silence.  Very intense flavors, especially after the mild spring taste of the amuse.  It took me a minute to decide that it was delicious.  I guess that's what people mean when they describe a dish as challenging.

Crab cake, with cucumber jello.  The crab had Asian/sushi flavors, and the cucumber jello was brilliant.  Sam said he doesn't like cucumbers, but the flavor here, in a friendlier texture was really nice. 

Escargot - oyster(?) mushrooms, pine nuts.  Warm, clean pesto flavors.  I've only ever had escargot that reminded me of a piece of rubber swimming in garlic butter, so eating it this way was nice. 

Foie gras tourchon.  My first time eating foie.  I now understand what all the fuss is about.  Sam had eaten it before, but when I asked him what it tasted like, he said it doesn't take like anything else, it just tastes like foie gras.  I hope I don't sound like a rube when I say this was the single best thing I've ever put in my mouth.  The Canadian ice wine was a great pairing. 

Asparagus soup served over whipped ricotta, prosciutto, and olive oil.  I wanted to lick the bowl. 

Seafood pasta in tomato sauce with fresh oregano.  This was the only dish I didn't really like.  It was served in a mini fishbowl, which I thought was a cool presentation, but it hindered actually eating it.  The shrimp still had the tail on, and it was akward getting a knife and fork in to the bowl to eat it.  I also think the shrimp was a little overcooked.  It tasted good, so I think maybe it only suffered in comparison.  This had probably the most interesting wine pairing - a very yeasty champagne that Sam said was like drinking bread.  And the pairing was sort of like having a crusty bread to mop up the tomato sauce with. 

Scallop.  I'm not sure I can recall what came with this, because the scallop was just perfect.  Crisp seared crust, absolutely silky inside.  I wanted to eat a dozen of them. 

Deconstructed paella - seared whitefish, sausage foam.  This turned the savory way up.  A nicely soft pinot here.

Waygu fillet, whipped smoked potatoes, tomato jam, blue cheese crisp, grainy mustard sauce.  This was about the time we just started sighing with pleasure.  A big California cabernet-sauvignon for this and the next course. 

Lamb 2 ways, tiny spring vegetables, honey jasmine sauce.  More sighs.  That honey sauce was perfect.

Cheese course - goat cheese, spiced nuts, almond bread.  Earlier my friend had asked the sommelier what else would be good paired with the ice wine.  So he brought that back here.  It was fun to see the wine take a totally different character against the cheese versus the foie.

Dessert - chocolate souffle cake, Kalua ice cream.  Tawny port pairing.  Smiles and sighs from both of us.

Champagne float.  This was the other near-miss.  Taken as a single drink, this was a little too much at this point - too cold, too bubbly.  Instead of this I would have loved a tiny espresso shot. 

Petit-fours - lavender chocolate truffle, caramel.  This was good.  The bitterness of the truffle actually provided that coffee note that I love with dessert.

We stumbled out of the restaurant afterwards, both of us sort of breathless and flushed, probably from all the wine.  OK, it was really from having eaten the best meal either of us had ever had. 

Go and do this if you haven't already!  We're lucky to have a restaurant of this caliber in Kansas City.  I can't wait to go for brunch.

Sounds like an amazing meal, do you remember what went with the Foie?

Just returned from an early dinner. We did *only* five courses so I can't be sure but will try and fill in the gaps based on what we had and maybe Dividend (when she comes out of her 12-course coma - which I certainly understand) can confirm or refute.

I really like this combo in this amuse. My favorite home juice combo is carrot-beet-celery and this made me think to work some cuke into the mix.

The soup also had tarragon and a bit of speck (a speck of speck?) in it tonight and it was mahvelous. I didn't lick the bowl but I did invoke the French family meal rule and swab it out with a crust of bread.

A last-minute add-on to the menu was a roasted beet, goat cheese, cress salad (there was some other almost floral element but it wasn't on the printed menu and I've forgotten what else) which we both enjoyed.

I had the torchini w/hen and oyster mushroom and at that point in the meal informed my companion that if anything ever happened to him I was going to marry the Chef de Cuisine :wub:

The foie tonight had plums, gooseberries and what? some kind of nut or legume (the S.O. had it and he is sleeping it off as I write). And a tuile of some sort.

The scallop had white asparagus and some haunting herb (Dave? Colby?) and a corn scape.

The white fish was merluza (hake) and exquisite, although the version we had wasn't paella, rather had fregola di sarda (tapioca-shaped pasta), roasted red pepper. This may/may not have been what Dividend had but sounds like it was similar in spirit.

He had the lamb two ways and that shoulder was un-freaking-believable. We were already planning to try it at home while we waited for dessert.

My wagyu striploin with smoked smashed potatoes wasn't half bad, either. Also carrots, pearl onion and the cutest and tastiest scallion I have ever encountered.

Wine pairings never fail to please - I think Jeremy must do a lot of tasting (for research purposes only, he assures me). I was concerned about a couple of them from the verbal description and nose but they were all hits when it counted, with the food.

Apple tart dessert was yummy as I'm sure the cheese will be tomorrow, should we ever decide to eat again.

Let's see, what else? The Nickel & Nickel chard I had with my scallop was really remarkable. It had all of the qualities of my favorite chard (Rombauer) but to a lesser extent, so it was food friendly. Rombauer is fabulous to drink but it blows away any food so it was nice to find an alternative that embraced the characteristics without overwhelming everything in its path. And I love the ice wine, too. I keep meaning to pick up a bottle to have around the house (although it wouldn't be around long, I fear). I think it's Inniskillen but I'm too lazy to look it up at this point.

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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