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Lisa J

ESCF Ferrandi culinary school

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Salut a tous! I have learned a lot from this topic! Thank you! In fact, I have applied the pastry course in ESCF in september 2010. Now I am waiting for the results. I will follow up this thread on the progress. :biggrin:

Yes, please do let us know. Bon chance!

And of course, we'd also be interested in hearing about how the year progresses.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Well, I didn't get in the first time since I posted, but I did get in this time! :) for the september session.

Is anyone here going to be my classmate?

So far, I'm using Capretz videos for french. But then I found Learn French by Podcast which is free on itunes, except for the pdf files which you need to pay for. I'm liking it better than French in Action. It's very VERY good. It's sort of immersion like FnA but not as "sink or swim" because it'll also break down the conversation in English.

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Congratulations! I wish I could be your classmate.

But unfortunately, I was not accepted, they put me in the waiting list. Maybe I applied a little late. If still no luck, I will apply for the next session.

Both English and French are not my mother tongue. I speak Chinese. Now I am learning french in Alliance Francaise in Beijing. I think the course there are the best I can find in China. We use the books Alter Ego. I will look for Capretz videos.

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Hi sonia,

Go to learner.org where you can watch the whole series of French in Action online for free.

I was put on the waiting list too last year. I think someone cancelled and Stephanie emailed me and others to see if anyone could take advantage of the slot. Unfortunately it was one month away from starting class and I couldn't possibly make the move in time. So there is hope while on the waiting list.

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Hi sonia,

Go to learner.org where you can watch the whole series of French in Action online for free.

I was put on the waiting list too last year. I think someone cancelled and Stephanie emailed me and others to see if anyone could take advantage of the slot. Unfortunately it was one month away from starting class and I couldn't possibly make the move in time. So there is hope while on the waiting list.

Thank you! I saw the site, it's very nice, but I can't watch the video. Because it's only available in the US and Canada.

And thank you for the information. I can't make the move in a month either. I wish someone will cancel earlier. :wink:

Have a nice time in Paris!

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Hi sonia,

Go to learner.org where you can watch the whole series of French in Action online for free.

I was put on the waiting list too last year. I think someone cancelled and Stephanie emailed me and others to see if anyone could take advantage of the slot. Unfortunately it was one month away from starting class and I couldn't possibly make the move in time. So there is hope while on the waiting list.

Thank you! I saw the site, it's very nice, but I can't watch the video. Because it's only available in the US and Canada.

And thank you for the information. I can't make the move in a month either. I wish someone will cancel earlier. :wink:

Have a nice time in Paris!

I have no idea what the library situation is in China, but you may be able to find the course materials, videos, audio tapes, & books, at your local library. Best of luck to you!


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Thank you, John DePaula. :rolleyes: There is a library in the French Culture Center here. I can find a lot of materials for learning.

I plan to learn the language in France this fall. Maybe I will find a internship in the pastry shop in order to know this filed in advance. I am a novice of pastry. I worked in the press before, I bake at home in my spare time. My dream is to open a pastry shop in Beijing. Now I want to change my career and to chase my dream.


Edited by sonia_x (log)

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Hi there,

I'd like to reopen this post to find out how the pastry program went/is going for you at Ferrandi? Would be great to hear from a recent grad/student as I'm planning to apply for the Sept session and am trying to decide between a few schools in France!

Thanks

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I graduated from there. The great thing about Ferrandi is that it's pretty good for getting the feel for what it's like to work in a patisserie. I work in a patisserie now, but I thought school was harder and much more demanding. In other words, it prepares you very well. Nothing was foreign when I started working. By the way, the connections for the apprenticeship are amazing. 3 star michelins, renown boutiques, I think every one in my class got their first choice.

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