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In SF - when the creperie Ti Couz first opened up - it was the lone place for blocks around in the Mission disctrict that people would go and eat.  You would not park more that a block or two away and preferbly cabbed in and out. 

BART to the 16th and Mission station was the preferred route of most people I knew. I wish we had crepes like that here in Vancouver! Do we?

To be fair though, I don't think Ti Couz changed the neighborhood. The dotcom bubble just drove development in the entire bay area. :wink:

Cheers!

Edited by Vancouver (log)
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Just wish it had a patio instead of an alleyway across from low income housing.

--------------------

No culture exists without food and drink

:smile:

"If cookin' with tabasco makes me white trash, I don't wanna be recycled."

courtesy of jsolomon

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As a Gastown property owner for the last nine years I've seen a big change in the demographics of the "hood" and SALT only helps improve my equity and reason to live in Gastown.

Hear, hear, Stephen! I've lived in Gastown for 7 years now and as you say, the changes in that time have been astounding. The last year or so has brought even more positive changes, with welcome additions such as Six Acres, Chill Winston and of course, Salt. I've always loved Gastown for the history and character of the neighbourhood, and seeing businesses such as these making investments in Gastown makes me very glad we decided to purchase here in the first place, and ensures we won't be moving any time soon.

On to my review of Salt!

I went with my husband and parents-in-law last Tuesday, and we had a thoroughly enjoyable experience. The room was about half full when we arrived at 6:30 and even more so by the time we left a few hours later. The decor and ambience very much reminded me of being in Europe - concrete, cool walls, warm wood, big open front window. I really like the look of the place - stark, yet beautiful. I'm hard pressed to think of a place that's similar in Vancouver, and that ambience, in addition to the menu and location, make Salt a truly unique destination.

Many of you have already commented on the food, and I will just add to the chorus to say that we all really enjoyed what we had. My husband had the "The Best of BC" tasting plate and it the pairings were excellent - highly recommended. I created my own tasting plate and asked our server to add wine tasters for me - the wines that were chosen were very good and I would try that route again.

Our server was excellent, despite suffering from a pulled muscle in her back, she was very friendly and extremely knowledgeable about all the food and wines on offer. She graciously went through every item on the menu for us, explaining the origin of the food as well as the taste, letting us know her personal favourites. She definitely added to our positive experience at the restaurant.

All in all, we really enjoyed the entire evening at Salt and will absolutely return. It's true the "back alley" may be off-putting to some, however those with a sense of adventure will find the reward waiting at the end well worth it. And once inside, you're in a world of your own.

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Salt was a very pleasant experience for me and my dining partner :]

We arrived last night 'round 6:30, it had just begun to get busy. My partner and I sat at the 'bar' and had a prime location for watching the team at work, making it all the more enjoyable because we both like to observe. We selected a mish-mash of meat and two cheeses to share a single plate, I can't quite remember everything we ordered but I recall that the honeycomb was amazing.

Out of nowhere we spied two chocolate mousse being plated, and my partner just had to try. How rich! It was decadent, a great compliment to our meal.

The service was good. I believe our waitress was named Lara, and she did a very good job of making our evening pleasant.

My dining partner wants to have another go next weekend. I'm definitely up for it!

Edited by trufflepig (log)
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As it is a rare occasion when we actually go out for a bite to eat (damn the whole living with the chef thing - I do most of the cooking at home!) I was quite excited when it was suggested that we check out Salt. (especially after blowing our dining budget at a very dissapointing meal at Monsoon - never again will will darken their doorstep! and this after realizing that Toshi's would never manage to seat and feed us without closing the kitchen before we were done with our drawn out sushi ordering - but I digress...)

Salt! Oh but what a wonderful time. The service! Chris immediately let us know exactly what was happening ie: "we just sat the bar and several 4 tops, so it might be 2 hours" - exactly the kind of info we love - so off the the Irish Heather Patio for a drink, safe in the knowledge that Chris had asked for our cel# and would call us when they had a spot -maybe an hour later we got the call - and btw we had a lovely Euro moment on the Heather's patio. The food! We ended up having 3 platters - more meat than cheese, a fantastic server - Melissa (Kelly Clarkson doppleganger), fabulous suggestions from Chris & Jay (proscuittio with peaches!) those Spanish almonds, a brilliant, brilliant idea - and just how we love to eat. Looking forward to catching some Salumi offerings -and wintertime kinda choices like rillettes. I have been raving to one and all and look forward to many visits.

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After eating there 5 times in 8 days - I have entered a 12 step program. Seriously - I have had a number of out of town friends rotating in and out of town and Salt has been a big hit with everyone. Nothing but good experiences so far - I am looking forward to returning once the restraining order expires.

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On a not so cool moment my Lexus was broken into the night I went there and it was parked just across the road from the Heather. An expensive evening $90 for wine and cheese and $2900 on the car :angry: Note to everyone take a taxi to Salt and do no leave your car anywhere on Carrall after 11pm.

Edited by eatglobally (log)

No culture exists without food and drink

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Meat, Cheese, Wine. So Simple it is brilliant.

Part of the excitement here is the simplicity.

It has been a long time since this town has seen something so simple that there is lots of hype and excitement. Does that create unreal expectations : quite possibly. It will settle down soon enough and everybody will get their legs under them.

There is no kitchen or bar per se. No Chef or kitchen brigade. I saw my server assist with every aspect of my choices. This is somethime new. They have hired waiters and run it like a Deli with wine. It takes a bit of getting used to.

Salt sounds like a spin-off of Batali's Bar Jamon in on Irving Place in New York City. We ate there last April, and I will definitely return when I'm back in September. http://www.newyorkmetro.com/listings/restaurant/bar-jamon/

Anyone else been to both?

Glad that Vancouver is learning that the best form of a compliment is a spin-off. Bravo.

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Meat, Cheese, Wine. So Simple it is brilliant.

Part of the excitement here is the simplicity.

It has been a long time since this town has seen something so simple that there is lots of hype and excitement. Does that create unreal expectations : quite possibly. It will settle down soon enough and everybody will get their legs under them.

There is no kitchen or bar per se. No Chef or kitchen brigade. I saw my server assist with every aspect of my choices. This is somethime new. They have hired waiters and run it like a Deli with wine. It takes a bit of getting used to.

Salt sounds like a spin-off of Batali's Bar Jamon in on Irving Place in New York City. We ate there last April, and I will definitely return when I'm back in September. http://www.newyorkmetro.com/listings/restaurant/bar-jamon/

Anyone else been to both?

Glad that Vancouver is learning that the best form of a compliment is a spin-off. Bravo.

Mr. Heather is a big fan of Batali and his father in Seattle (lamb proscuitto). he spent some time in NY and Seattle for inspiration. Nice to see a piece of NY in YCR.

Cheers,

Stephen Bonner

Edited by SBonner (log)

"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

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Meat, Cheese, Wine. So Simple it is brilliant.

Part of the excitement here is the simplicity.

It has been a long time since this town has seen something so simple that there is lots of hype and excitement. Does that create unreal expectations : quite possibly. It will settle down soon enough and everybody will get their legs under them.

There is no kitchen or bar per se. No Chef or kitchen brigade. I saw my server assist with every aspect of my choices. This is somethime new. They have hired waiters and run it like a Deli with wine. It takes a bit of getting used to.

Salt sounds like a spin-off of Batali's Bar Jamon in on Irving Place in New York City. We ate there last April, and I will definitely return when I'm back in September. http://www.newyorkmetro.com/listings/restaurant/bar-jamon/

I was unaware that you could take the meat from Salumi across the border.

Anyone else been to both?

Glad that Vancouver is learning that the best form of a compliment is a spin-off. Bravo.

Mr. Heather is a big fan of Batali and his father in Seattle (lamb proscuitto). he spent some time in NY and Seattle for inspiration. Nice to see a piece of NY in YCR.

Cheers,

Stephen Bonner

I was unaware that you could transport meat from Salumi across the border.

Edited by shelora (log)
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Meat, Cheese, Wine. So Simple it is brilliant.

Part of the excitement here is the simplicity.

It has been a long time since this town has seen something so simple that there is lots of hype and excitement. Does that create unreal expectations : quite possibly. It will settle down soon enough and everybody will get their legs under them.

There is no kitchen or bar per se. No Chef or kitchen brigade. I saw my server assist with every aspect of my choices. This is somethime new. They have hired waiters and run it like a Deli with wine. It takes a bit of getting used to.

Salt sounds like a spin-off of Batali's Bar Jamon in on Irving Place in New York City. We ate there last April, and I will definitely return when I'm back in September. http://www.newyorkmetro.com/listings/restaurant/bar-jamon/

I was unaware that you could take the meat from Salumi across the border.

Anyone else been to both?

Glad that Vancouver is learning that the best form of a compliment is a spin-off. Bravo.

Mr. Heather is a big fan of Batali and his father in Seattle (lamb proscuitto). he spent some time in NY and Seattle for inspiration. Nice to see a piece of NY in YCR.

Cheers,

Stephen Bonner

I was unaware that you could transport meat from Salumi across the border.

shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

cook slow, eat slower

J.Chovancek

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Meat, Cheese, Wine. So Simple it is brilliant.

Part of the excitement here is the simplicity.

It has been a long time since this town has seen something so simple that there is lots of hype and excitement. Does that create unreal expectations : quite possibly. It will settle down soon enough and everybody will get their legs under them.

There is no kitchen or bar per se. No Chef or kitchen brigade. I saw my server assist with every aspect of my choices. This is somethime new. They have hired waiters and run it like a Deli with wine. It takes a bit of getting used to.

Salt sounds like a spin-off of Batali's Bar Jamon in on Irving Place in New York City. We ate there last April, and I will definitely return when I'm back in September. http://www.newyorkmetro.com/listings/restaurant/bar-jamon/

Anyone else been to both?

Glad that Vancouver is learning that the best form of a compliment is a spin-off. Bravo.

Mr. Heather is a big fan of Batali and his father in Seattle (lamb proscuitto). he spent some time in NY and Seattle for inspiration. Nice to see a piece of NY in YCR.

Cheers,

Stephen Bonner

Don't quote me. I just know that Sean has been to Batali's father's place in Seattle and he did once bring back some of the stunning lamb proscuitto for personal consumption :raz: which I got to taste. I have not been to SALT so I do not know if it is there.

Stephen

Edited by SBonner (log)

"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

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  • 2 weeks later...

Monday, July 24, 2006

My friend and I went to Salt on the sage advice of canucklehead.

gallery_36558_3077_135384.jpg

Up against the back wall is a gigantic chalkboard menu.

gallery_36558_3077_4488.jpg

Ox tongue, corned beef, wild boar chorizo. Stella cherries, Similkameen honeycomb, Guiness grainy mustard. Everything was superb, even the cherries were extremely fresh. I've never had honeycomb before; it was terrific, takes a while to melt in your mouth.

gallery_36558_3077_69141.jpg

Ash camembert, head cheese, terrine de campagne.

Service was fine, especially for a restaurant that had only been open for two weeks. The waitstaff dress code was rather unusual: black shirt, dark jeans and colorful sneakers. I love jeans and sneakers -- hell, look at my avatar -- but I don't know about waitstaff wearing something so casual. It's one thing to have to not have a dress code at all, but if one is going to require one why mandate something so casual? It seems, at best, an ineffective attempt at being cool.

The walls were brick and the floor concrete. With the restaurant only half-full the volume was deafening and I had difficulty carrying on a conversation with my friend sitting directly across the table.

But the food cannot be faulted. Everything we ordered blew me away. I'm just not used to artisanal cheese and charcuterie. Highlights of the meal were the head cheese, corned beef (I don't usually go for something so pedestrian but this was so tender and fatty!) and honey comb. There were several items that I would've loved to order by the pound to take home -- I wonder if that's an option.

As a restaurant concept, Salt is inspiring. The only kitchen equipment they need is a meat slicer, they don't even need gas hookups. No need for chefs, just one consultant that can source the best products. I hope more "tasting bar" restaurants spring up across the continent.

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It's one thing to have to not have a dress code at all, but if one is going to require one why mandate something so casual? It seems, at best, an ineffective attempt at being cool.

Cool post.

Edited by Andrew Morrison (log)

Andrew Morrison

Food Columnist | The Westender

Editor & Publisher | Scout Magazine

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Monday, July 24, 2006

My friend and I went to Salt on the sage advice of canucklehead.

gallery_36558_3077_135384.jpg

Up against the back wall is a gigantic chalkboard menu.

gallery_36558_3077_4488.jpg

Ox tongue, corned beef, wild boar chorizo. Stella cherries, Similkameen honeycomb, Guiness grainy mustard. Everything was superb, even the cherries were extremely fresh. I've never had honeycomb before; it was terrific, takes a while to melt in your mouth.

gallery_36558_3077_69141.jpg

Ash camembert, head cheese, terrine de campagne.

Service was fine, especially for a restaurant that had only been open for two weeks. The waitstaff dress code was rather unusual: black shirt, dark jeans and colorful sneakers. I love jeans and sneakers -- hell, look at my avatar -- but I don't know about waitstaff wearing something so casual. It's one thing to have to not have a dress code at all, but if one is going to require one why mandate something so casual? It seems, at best, an ineffective attempt at being cool.

The walls were brick and the floor concrete. With the restaurant only half-full the volume was deafening and I had difficulty carrying on a conversation with my friend sitting directly across the table.

But the food cannot be faulted. Everything we ordered blew me away. I'm just not used to artisanal cheese and charcuterie. Highlights of the meal were the head cheese, corned beef (I don't usually go for something so pedestrian but this was so tender and fatty!) and honey comb. There were several items that I would've loved to order by the pound to take home -- I wonder if that's an option.

As a restaurant concept, Salt is inspiring. The only kitchen equipment they need is a meat slicer, they don't even need gas hookups. No need for chefs, just one consultant that can source the best products. I hope more "tasting bar" restaurants spring up across the continent.

I'm not a big fan of the running shoe look in any establishment whether it be casual or not. Nice photo's and I agree on the noise.

Ralph

Edited by eatglobally (log)

No culture exists without food and drink

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It's one thing to have to not have a dress code at all, but if one is going to require one why mandate something so casual? It seems, at best, an ineffective attempt at being cool.

Welcome to Vancouver, where the "dress code" is just a suggestion. I have to agree with a couple other comments upthread Kent. You're of course entitled to your own opinion, but the "dress code" comment seems a bit odd, especially when contrasted with your other statement:

As a restaurant concept, Salt is inspiring.

Inspiring? Really? I can think of a dozen people who do this exact sort of thing (cheese, meat, wine) in their own homes every Friday night, yours truly included. It's hardly a new idea, so "inspired" seems a bit strong.

What impressed me about Salt was the fact that once again Sean & co. have created a silk purse out of a sow's ear. Bringing this concept to Blood Alley took some courage and foresight. Now, if city council would just fast-track the Whitecaps Stadium I could have some Pinot & prosciutto before watching the beautiful game in the world's most beautiful city!

A.

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Who cares what the servers are wearing? It's a casual place...it only makes sense that the servers look casual. You guys should stick to Yaletown where all the servers stick to their yuppie uniforms.

Forced casualness is something else completely, a paradox even. It would've been different if the waitstaff were simply allowed to wear whatever they want.

Inspiring?  Really?  I can think of a dozen people who do this exact sort of thing (cheese, meat, wine) in their own homes every Friday night, yours truly included.  It's hardly a new idea, so "inspired" seems a bit strong. 

It's fairly unique as far as restaurants go, though. Sure, there are wine bars, too, but those usually serve some hot food and don't have the emphasis on charcuterie. By 'inspiring' I mean for the restaurant industry. Maybe Texas is just behind the times but I certainly have never seen any "tasting bars" (the term Salt uses) around here. I love charcuterie so I hope the idea really takes off.

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If it was a CFD chain forced casualness would be apt description - Major marketing types deciding that that what the kids want these days and forcing the waitrons to comply.

But putting Salt in the context of the design (and the neighbourhood), it's a bit OTT. There are two major sneaker shops, Live Stock and A-Life, just around the corner. Kicks from these stores range from about $60-$1000 with 1-offs, special editions and artists' interpretations. Seeing a server sporting these rather than the ubiquitous black shoes is refreshing.

The sneakers are way quieter, too. Those damn acoustics engineers have been telling me that floor and the roof are the most important noise zones. The clatter of fancy shoes would get amplfied pretty quick.

Edited by MightyMrQ (log)

Quentin Kayne

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I'm hitting Vancouver at the end of the month and I'll be pretty busy with work stuff but I do have an opening for a later dinner one night. (As always, so many delicious restos, so little time.) I've been given the following options: Salt, CinCin and FigMint. Which do I choose?

Also, based on the forum discourse, it seems like Salt is only open for dinner. True? I think this sort of thing would make for a perfect luncheon or afternoon snack...or breakfast for that matter.

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Also, based on the forum discourse, it seems like Salt is only open for dinner. True? I think this sort of thing would make for a perfect luncheon or afternoon snack...or breakfast for that matter.

I'm alarmed. I totally agree that some cured meats would really hit the spot for lunch. At least on the weekends :biggrin:

"There are two things every chef needs in the kitchen: fish sauce and duck fat" - Tony Minichiello

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