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Pig Skin Choi


Dejah
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I was given a bag of this vegtable last night. There are 2 ways of cooking this: as a soup which is good for someone trying to quit smoking, or to stir-fry with blackbean garlic/ginger sauce.

I did the latter as I was also doing clams with dow see, garlic, chili, ginger, and shiso.

I'm not fond of this veg. as it is kinda slimy and has a hint of "dirt" taste.

Would appreciate more information on this choi. Would hate to miss out on something good just because I didn't like what I did last night.

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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"Slimy" is right. My father liked this vegetable so I ate it from time to time growing up. I believe in Cantonese it is called "San Choy" ("San" means weak, usually in terms of health). To make a quick soup, boil it with some marinated pork slices and break a salted egg or two and drop it in. I haven't had this for over 20 some years though. Have not seen it sold in Asian markets in California.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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潺菜 Chan cai / san choi

My vegetable book calls it 'mucilaginous' rather than slippery. "The taste is mild and innofensive, but the feeling of it in ones mouth is not universally popular." It is also supposed to be a mild laxative. And it says it is used almost exclusively in soups. ~~~~ oil/ginger/chicken stock/san choi/bean curd/salt/pepper ---- or a salted duck egg instead of salt.

Here is a bit more on it: (Scroll down to Malabar Spinach)

http://www.foodsubs.com/Greenckg.html#Malabar%20spinach

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As posted in the thread on Dow See Clams with Shiso, the book I have on Chinese vegetables (maybe the same as yours, Jo-mel?) calls it Saan Choi, "slippery vegetable" in English, although the Chinese name does translate more as mucilaginous. It says that in Chinese cooking, it's used almost exclusively in soups, and suggests it as a substitute for okra in Western recipes.

SuzySushi

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I was given a bag of this vegtable last night. There are 2 ways of cooking this: as a soup which is good for someone trying to quit smoking, or to stir-fry with blackbean garlic/ginger sauce.

I did the latter as I was also doing clams with dow see, garlic, chili, ginger, and shiso.

I'm not fond of this veg. as it is kinda slimy and has a hint of "dirt" taste.

Would appreciate more information on this choi. Would hate to miss out on something good just because I didn't like what I did last night.

I agree with the other posters, saan choi, literally slime vegetable.

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It is San Choi,also called "Malabar Spinach".I grew up eating it,so I don't really find the sliminess abig deal.In fact it makes a good curry with shrimp,I will post the recipe if you want it.

Also another thing my mom used to make with San Choi was meat ball soup and beating an egg on it in the end.

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It is San Choi,also called "Malabar Spinach".I grew up eating it,so I don't really find the sliminess abig deal.In fact it makes a good curry with shrimp,I will post the recipe if you want it.

Also another thing my mom used to make with San Choi was meat ball soup and beating an egg on it in the end.

Would appreciate your posting the recipe, warlockdilemma. Thanks!

My s-i-l made the soup as several of you mentioned. My mom told me yesterday that saan choi did indeed act as a laxative! :rolleyes::laugh:

The Chinese aunties all seem to enjoy saan choi. Mom used to grow a variety in China; it grew on a trellis. She had never eaten it until now. Most of what she grew before was sold to feed pigs. Pig skin choi :hmmm:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Dejah,here is a simple recipe that I use for San Choi Shrimp curry.

Ingredients

1 Large onion sliced

1 tsp Ginger paste

1 tsp garlic paste

1tsp cumin seed.(you can avoid this but it adds more flavour to the curry)

1 tsp curry powder (normally I se a mix of chilli powder/turmeric powder/coriander powder and cumin powder),depends on whatever is conveninet for you.

1/2 tsp black pepper powder.

2 lbs san choi

1 lbs tiger prawns

Method

1. Heat 2 tsp of oil and once its hot add the cumin seed.

2.Add the onions and fry till light golden brown.

3. Add the ginger and garlic paste.Fry for a couple of minutes,then add the curry powder (or all the powders depending on how u make it).Fry this till you curry powder blends into a paste.Make sure at this time ,the paste does not stick to the pan.

4.Add the shrimp and blend it into the paste and finally add the san choi.Add about a half cup of water and cover.Cook for about 15-20 minutes.Add salt to taste.Your curry is ready.Add more water if you want more gravy.

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Dejah,here is a simple recipe that I use for San Choi Shrimp curry.

Thanks, warlockdilemma. :smile:

I'll have to go begging for more saan choi from the Chinese gardeners now.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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The Chinese aunties all seem to enjoy saan choi. Mom used to grow a variety in China; it grew on a trellis. She had never eaten it until now. Most of what she grew before was sold to feed pigs. Pig skin choi  :hmmm:

I have heard my father said those vegetables were fed to pigs (especially "mother" pig). Where did the "skin" part come from?

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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San choy is interesting if dusted with seasoned rice flour or corn starch then quickly and briefly deep-fried, tossed with sliced red chiles and pork crackling and roasted sesame salt (gomasio). (For real pig skin effect.)

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San choy is interesting if dusted with seasoned rice flour or corn starch then quickly and briefly deep-fried, tossed with sliced red chiles and pork crackling and roasted sesame salt (gomasio). (For real pig skin effect.)

That is something I am gonna try out this weekend,sounds yummy from the word go....

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