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All About Cheesecake Crust


KMPickard
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Well, since my advice seems to go against what everyone else is saying, I looked it up. The America's Test Kitchen Cookbook recommends 16 Oreo Cookies (whole) with 2 tablespoons butter. I think I use about 24 cookies and 3 tablespoons butter.

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when you grind whole or chopped cookies in the food processor, you want to make sure they are well ground. When I was having trouble with Oreo crusts (for cheesecakes) last year, (the crusts would weep when I was unmolding them; I use a removeable bottom pan lightly buttered before pressing the crumbs on), one piece of advice talked about the texture of the crumbs and sure enough, the problem went away when I left the crumbs in the processor for longer than usual so it was more well ground.

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Well, since my advice seems to go against what everyone else is saying, I looked it up.  The America's Test Kitchen Cookbook recommends 16 Oreo Cookies (whole) with 2 tablespoons butter.  I think I use about 24 cookies and 3 tablespoons butter.

Yes, I have used this crust for making the Chocolate Cream Pie in Baking Illustrated (the pie is fabulous). The headnote says they tried Famous Wafers, but "we didn't care for the flavor of these crusts unbaked and found them somewhat tough baked." With Oreos "we hoped that the creaminess of the centers would lend flavor and softness to the finished crust." It's extremely easy because you just pulverize the cookies in the food processor. These quantities are for a 9-inch pie shell.

Hungry Monkey May 2009
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I made a cheesecake recently and used Pepperidge Farms double chocolate milanos for the crust (chocolate ovals with chocolate filling).

Off topic, I know, but I really liked it, quick and easy chocolate cookie crust.

Just wanted to share.

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  • 1 year later...

I made this cheesecake recipe (sorry if it takes a long time to load - it was slow today, the screen said 'done' on the bottom left, but it still took a minute to pop up). It is everything that my note says it is. Wonderful, rich, intensely strawberry-y :raz:! But I would like to improve the crust. It was overly moist and soft almost cake-like. I would like something crisper. Is that possible with such a moist cheesecake? Would it help to use shortbread cooky crumbs instead?

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My very favorite crust for my cheesecakes has always been made with Pepperidge Farms Butter Chessmen cookies... crushed up in processor and melted butter is added ... no sugar needed ... pressed into a 10 inch springform pan (chilled) then filled... I love that heavenly buttery taste along with the creamy vanilla-y cheesecake!! :wub:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Thanks, Melissa! I really thought that that would be the answer. I love those freakin' cookies. I am an utter snob about 'store boughten' cookies, but those things are crack to me. I almost never buy them unless we are having overnight guests (you have to have something a little nibbly for guests, right :wink:) - those and the Pepperridge Farm gingerbread men were our everyday cookies when I was growing up and I've never recovered :laugh:!

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I would like to improve the crust.  It was overly moist and soft almost cake-like.  I would like something crisper.  Is that possible with such a moist cheesecake?  Would it help to use shortbread cooky crumbs instead?

Try using an almond crumb crust:

1-1/2 c almonds

3 T sugar

3 T butter (softened)

1/4 tsp cinnamon

Pulse everything together in a food processor until you get fine crumbs, then press into the pan.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
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I really thought that that would be the answer.  I love those freakin' cookies.  I am an utter snob about 'store boughten' cookies, but those things are crack to me.

The only real challenge is not eating them before pouring in the cheesecake filling .. all told, this could shorten one's life by at least three months! :laugh: Fat, butter, sugar .. yeah, life is worth living!!

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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my mom hates soggy crusts for cheesecake so i always crush up cookies and pour them into the pan, no butter or sugar. they don't get all mushy that way. :smile:

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my mom hates soggy crusts for cheesecake so i always crush up cookies and pour them into the pan, no butter or sugar.  they don't get all mushy that way. :smile:

Oh that is a good idea, thanks Dailey. I love vanilla wafers as crust, plus you get to eat the leftover wafers. :unsure:

Unfortunately, the crust always ends up soggy, because I use a good amount of butter, so I will try this next time.

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  • 1 year later...

We're wrapping the springform pan in foil. Double foil even, but the water is still seeping in and causing the edge of the cheesecake crusts to be soggy. Any help would be great. Thanks.

Stephen W.

Pastry Chef/Owner

The Sweet Life Bakery

Vineland, NJ

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I mean we would just go around the edge with a knife and then whack the pan and they plop out--that was at work. At home I line the bottom of the pan with a cardboard circle then foil or parchment and it just falls out of the pan. But I freeze my cheesecakes in order to handle them. Cheesecake freezes beautifully of course. Some people are allergic to freezing things but I do it.

You don't really need the cardboard circle but I like the insurance. Especially if it's like a weird shape or a half sheet or something like that.

Umm, my spring form pans can retain moisture in the rolled edges too. So that's another good reason to avoid using them.

Just some cheesecake thoughts. :biggrin:

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Like K8Memphis, I use a regular 9 x 2 cake pan. I don't freeze my cheesecakes (I'm not agin' it, I just usually don't), and they come out fine. I line w/parchment and chill thoroughly, go around edges with thin plastic, then invert (usually onto plastic wrap but not absolutely necessary). Usually after 30 seconds there's a PLOP and the cheesecake is unmolded. If not, a hot towel or torch does the trick. Re-invert and voila - no seepage, perfect cheesecake.

Sometimes I make my crust separately to keep it crunchier. It's little PITA to re-invert squarely (or is that roundly) on the crust, but not terrible.

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I make a lot of cheesecakes and I use solid 9 x 3 pans. spray with nonstick spray, pat in my crust (kind of a sable cookie crust) and bake and then pour in my filling. bake in a water bath. Cool. Chill thoroughly or even freeze. Place briefly (like 10 seconds) in a sink or larger pan filled with hot water. Invert onto something and out it slides. Reinvert onto cardboard circle. Voila! Also easier to slice when almost or partially frozen.

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