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Fried Cod Fish Tongues


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A friend returned from Newfoundland today and raved about the food. Especially the breaded and fried cod fish tongues. This friend is a military interrogator trained in deception. He likes to see how far he can string me along. I figured he was at it again until I searched the net and found a couple of recipes. But no pictures.

So what's up with fried cod fish tongues? Anyone have a pic?

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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I don't have a picture, but I have eaten them.

We were in Newfoundland a couple of years ago, so had to try the local delicacy. Once was enough for me!

Although I loved the pork cracklings that came with the dish, I couldn't stand the gelatinous nature of the tongues.

My husband loved them though, so maybe it's just me... :blink:

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It is Cod Sounds that intrigue me. The sound is the swim bladder that allows a fish to float. They were a real delicacy up until Victorian times. Lots of recipes for them in old cookbooks. Anybody actually eaten those?

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

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You've never cracked open a cooked fish head and dug around? The best parts are the eyes, cheeks, tongue (in smaller fish [20 lbs or less] it is very tender), and the brains. I've never seen the tongues of bigger fish though, so this cod tongue sounds quite promising.

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the breaded, fried cod tongues are a huge delicacy for Newfoundlanders. They also serve cod cheeks, another big time treat. gotta love Newfoundlanders... :biggrin: salt o' the earth, b'y...

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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The contrast in textures is the charm of a cod tongue. They consist of two small nuggets of muscle inside a sac of gelatinous tissue; when quick-fried in hot fat (traditionally from rendered salt pork) you get the crisp-fried outside, gelatinous middle, and firm muscle all in one bite. For those who detest gelatinous textures it can be off-putting, but taken altogether it has the same appeal as a crisp-fried oyster.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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For those who detest gelatinous textures it can be off-putting, but taken altogether it has the same appeal as a crisp-fried oyster.

I love it when people put things into context. A good comparision is always helpful in "exotic" food situations. Thanks!

can't believe it's not butter? i can.

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So there is a bunch of Americans who come to a St. John's restaurant, and they see "Cod tongues" on the menu. One of them gets the waitress and asks, "excuse me, what is this 'Cod tongue'?" The waitress says "Well, you know the cod...?" (he nods) "... Well, that's their tongue."

"Bells will ring, ting-a-ling-a-ling, ting.... the bell... bing... 'moray" -John Daker

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Cod tongues are indeed a local favourite in Newfoundland. Like many uniquely local products, found virtually anywhere in the world, it helps to have an intimate knowledge of the subject. A key consideration when it comes to cod tongues is the size. Small is often beautiful in the food world and this holds true in the case of cod tongues, particularly if the gelatinous side of the product is off-putting. The small ones (not much larger in diameter than a toonie) tend to fry up nicely and are almost devoid of any gelatinous texture. Of course as mentioned above in the oyster example (and one could potentially add seared foie gras to the debate) there are those who appreciate the gelatinous inside that is so unappealing to many others.

The pork cracklings that usually accompany the dish are known locally as scrunchions. Expertly prepared ‘tongues’ of the right size, accompanied by Robuchon style creamy mashed potatoes and steamed asparagus all topped with a decadent quantity of scrunchions is most certainly a world class taste treat…. albeit like a good, very dry martini, one that may be an acquired taste.

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Oh yum...

Deep fried cod tongue and cheeks... is there a better snack food?

All to say, yes I love 'em. They go down well with pitchers of beer on a Friday afternoon, followed by a fish and chip dinner with mushy peas, and for dessert, a thick slice of figgy pudding ... MMMMMMMM

Edited by gourmande (log)

Cheese: milk’s leap toward immortality – C.Fadiman

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