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hungryCAT

What/Who is a "Foodie"?

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?..The pattern she describes is one in which privileged, mostly white people elite and hijack cultural differences in order to soothe their own anxieties about social change. Comfort food, indeed.

Not deconstructionist drivel? Really?

I actually thought we ate ethnic food because it was exciting, exotic, and a change from our normal eating habits. To think I was really suppressing my inner prejudices.

As a psychologist who tests these sorts of statements for veracity using experiments all I can say is the author is guilty of unsupported assertions using as its basis a socio-political framework that deconstructs the foodie phenomenon. Call it what you will but I'll call it what I did above.

Uhh, I didn't say it *wasn't* "deconstructionist drivel". I said I wasn't sure I would call it that, which is not the same thing, basically because I have not read the book. Neither have you, I gather. What you quoted seems to be the words of the REVIEWER (in my reading of that review), upon which much opprobrium has already been heaped by folks here very worked up over it. :-)

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I must be reading an alternate thread on this topic since I haven't seen that anyone is worked up about it. I have also not read the book and don't intend to. The quoted sentence from the article is indeed deconstructionist drivel. By that I mean, the reviewer is ascribing an intent to the author that may not be what the author intended. It's the same impulse that drives deconstructionists to find homosexual subplots or hidden fascist impulses in Shakespeare plays or Herman Melville novels.

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No, Huiray is right in pointing out that I hadn't read the book.

I went in to the book on Amazon preview and far from being In the tone of the review it seems to be a well researched and well argued thesis on the transformation of American dining. The writing is measured and supported by extensive footnotes. Not quite my preferred reading as I am not part of that scene but one that should interest many of the foodies on these forums.

The reviewer on the other hand ...


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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Thanks all for clarifying fusion, never realized when I made a ratatouille I was actually making a fusion dish. I read three times the very first post and I still don't understand what the fuss is all about. And I have been to college and speak two languages not that it is a big deal but to let you know I am familiar with different writings.. If it is about the word comfort food, I think it means simple easy to make foods that taste and looks really appetizing on your plate therefore making you feel good-------> comfort-able-------> comfort food , no?!!!

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"Foodies" are people who obsess about food.

 

They are the sort of people who turn to the restaurants reviews page in the newspaper before checking the front page to see if World War Three has broken out. They spend hours poring over reviews of restaurants they know they will never, ever visit, then go online to check out the same restaurants' menus.

 

"Foodies" are people who read recipes for things they can't buy where they live or can't afford. "Foodies" even buy cookbooks in languages they can't read or speak.

 

"Foodies" think about food with their full senses. All six.

 

But, more than anything, "foodies" like to talk about food. They like to talk about food to the extent that they seldom talk about anything else. They talk about food to the point where their friends glaze over and their partners lie awake at night planning the grisliest way to murder them the next time they again mention those skylarks in aspic they ate twenty years ago half way up a mountain in Andorra, while the "foodies" lie next to them dreaming about that smoked snake soup they ate up a different mountain in SW China. "Foodies" know that the best food is always found halfway up mountains in other countries. 

 

Having alienated their entire extended families and their entire social network, these miserable wretches end up joining internet forums like this in order to carry on with their evil addiction.

 

"Foodies" who reached such terrifying depths of depravity spend hours, discussing food, sharing food experiences, recipes, restaurant tips. "Foodies" take pictures of everything they eat and post them on the forums. "Foodies" even cook food just to take the photographs. "Foodies" plan the menu for dinner around what they plan on posting on the forums. Check out the Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner threads. "Foodies" happily post two dozen photographs of poached eggs they prepared for breakfast on different days - always with the money shot. How many bacon sandwich pictures have I posted? I dread to think.

 

"Foodies" discuss, share and get inspiration from like minded people. A bit like a support group. 

 

When asked why they like a certain food, "foodies" never answer "because they taste good and it's pleasant to eat them" That is a given. They will tell you why they taste good, why it's pleasant to eat them. They will go on for ages about the precise types of sashimi they are eating and compare and contrast them in terms of flavour, freshness, sweetness, saltiness, umami - whether the wasabi is real (rarely) or just dyed horseradish (usually). They will extol the delights of one variety over another. Which is best? The salmon or the tuna. Perhaps, the mackerel. They will discuss the slicing techniques of the sashimi and the precise serving temperature. "Foodies" will whip out a thermometer to check. The will discuss the rolling techniques of the sushi and whether the rice is properly cooked and vinegared. They will discuss the range on offer. Is it balanced? How is the presentation. They will sit as close to the preparation area as possible to make sure they don't miss a trick.

 

Being a "foodie" isn't something you pick out at random in "Every Child's Selection of Hobbies". It is something which develops.

 

Right. I'm off with a friend for some donkey noodles. 


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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But I think we need a grading system for foodies sort of like the USDA system for meat. Right up there and designated Prime are the sort of foodie you describe. On the opposite end of the scale are Standard grade foodies. I like to think I fall into this grade. Never been inside a Michelin starred restaurant, rarely read a restaurant review unless it's of a so-called ethnic place because I want some idea of the food offerings. Take photos of my food only to share on eG and so far have always eaten what I photographed. Love to read cook books but rarely in a language I don't speak. Consider scrambled eggs and a glass of wine to be the most delicious and memorable meal of my life because it was shared with the man I loved at a time when life had dealt us too many below-the-belt-blows. Anyway you see where I am going. There are foodies and then there are FOODIES and I am grateful we can all mingle on eG.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I object to the term because it's infantile in my opinion. So I don't use it. I'm not bothered if someone calls me one, that's on them.

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The term "foodie" simply makes me squirm, and I'm not even sure why. If someone calls me a foodie I take offense; it is infantile, I agree. I like eating tasty food. I like reading recipes and saving a recipe until I either make it and toss it, make it and love it, or don't ever make it and eventually wonder why in hell I ever clipped it in the first place. I cook all the time, mostly because I don't have the money to eat out a lot, or rather I chose to use the money for something other than restaurant meals. And I'm pretty happy with the food I cook and often disappointed in restaurant food, especially when it comes to value. My diet has changed in many ways over the past twenty years. Partly because I am more aware of what can be done with food (become a better cook?), partly because I have some health restrictions and needed to adjust the types of recipes I rely on and lastly because of environmental issues.

 

If pressed, I would say my philosophy of food comes down to this: why eat a lousy tuna melt if you have the time, ingredients and the means to make a good one? I enjoy looking at the food photos on eG but I have no desire to photograph anything I make or eat in a restaurant. I only like reading about food if the writing is good.I admit that I think about food a lot. That's because I love eating and because I'm the one who does all the cooking in my house. And I wouldn't be happy eating the same old thing day in day out and because I'm always looking for ways to make something good even better. I rarely buy or cook expensive ingredients. I want eating to be fun, and mostly healthy. When it is treated as a competitive sport it's a turnoff.

 

The word "gourmet" is also a weird word. What does it mean? It comes with a ton of baggage and never seems a very useful term. Also it is devoid of any political intent and therefore becomes a slippery slope. If you are going to eat bluefin tuna sushi you should know that soon you may be eating the last one. If you are going to eat foie gras you should know how it is made. It irritates me no end when I hear people say that cutting a shark's fin off doesn't hurt it, or that geese like being overfed by a tube or that fish have no lips so they don't feel the hook or that lobsters have no nerve endings or whatever. Okay, I'm done. Not sure why I went on such a rant. Now I'm going to finally go down and eat breakfast. If anyone cares, it will be coffee with chicory, leftover multigrain apple pancakes popped in the toaster and served with butter, maple syrup and whatever fruit has not yet been consumed by my husband. Bon appetit.

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As I noted back in 2008, it doesn't bother me. I don't describe myself with the word in conversation. If someone asks if I am a foodie or makes a comment I usually respond that yes I am interested in food and that I find it to be the universal language.

 

A conversation in the local big chain grocers the other day jelled that feeling for me. I was third in line and the person being served was writing a check...slowly...so plenty of time to chat. I noted to the gentleman in front of me that the cardboard carrier for his 6-pack of Modelo dark beer looked like it was falling apart. He thanked me and said he had just noticed it himself and would be careful; we didn't want broken glass and beer all over the parking lot. We went on to exchange some jokes about Irish drinkers. As he got to the cashier he said that life was good as it was a beautiful day and he had Rubio's (local chain) mahi-mahi fish tacos planned for lunch. The cashier had never had fish tacos so that discussion ensued and then the man and I discussed the excellent salsa bar at the referenced restaurant. He concluded with "Have a lovely afternoon ladies. I guess we are all foodies at heart". 

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It could be said, as a gross generalization, that a "foodie" is someone who thinks about the food they eat. How much they think about it, is for the grading scale of obsessiveness.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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I prefer to call myself an "eater". Sometimes "glutton", if I am being honest with myself.

 

In my head, I categorize people interested in food as "food hobbyists".

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I prefer these terms.  

"The term gourmet may refer to a person with refined or discriminating taste who is knowledgeable in the craft and art of food and food preparation.[1] Gourmand carries additional connotations of one who simply enjoys food in great quantities. An epicure is similar to a gourmet, but the word may sometimes carry overtones of excessive refinement. A gourmet chef is a chef of particularly high caliber of cooking talent and skill."

 

I am not a food snob, I dont have the cash  or lack of  family to devote my every waken moment  to find  THE perfect  thing or   got to the  in  restaurants .  I take my money and make  wonders out of nothing and  I teach my daughter the joy of cooking and the pleasure of a good meal.  Lots of  poor man food from Italy, France and Spain is served at Michelin star restaurants , so why cant my country and my  poor man food be something fine`?


Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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"Foodie" pretty obviously, and pretty simply, means somebody interested in food. 

 

I'm a foodie.  I'm crazy about being a foodie.  I love being a foodie.  Often I get together with my foodie friends and we do foodie things.  Whole new worlds have opened to me because I'm a foodie.

 

If somebody wants to insult me by calling me a name, they're going to have to do better than foodie.

 

And that's not hard to do.  In a world where people routinely call one another the most vile, hurtful, insulting things they can think of, taking umbrage and getting all wrapped around the axle over "foodie" requires far more negative energy than I've got.

 

:cool:

 

 

.


Edited by Jaymes (log)
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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I'm a foodie and I have been one most of my life.  When I have been introduced to a new culture or a new cuisine, I try to sample everything that looks interesting (as long as I am not allergic to a component).

I introduce myself to folks in "ethnic" markets and stores and go to ethnic public celebrations.

 

I don't know why some people abhor the term - it is "folksy" and doesn't  put people off who seem to believe the term "gourmet" is a bit highbrow.

 

And it encompasses all levels and phases of food from the gathering to the preparing to the consuming and all points in between.

 

Food enthusiast, food fan(atic), food lover, &etc.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I'm a foodie and I have been one most of my life.  When I have been introduced to a new culture or a new cuisine, I try to sample everything that looks interesting (as long as I am not allergic to a component).

I introduce myself to folks in "ethnic" markets and stores and go to ethnic public celebrations.

 

I don't know why some people abhor the term - it is "folksy" and doesn't  put people off who seem to believe the term "gourmet" is a bit highbrow.

 

And it encompasses all levels and phases of food from the gathering to the preparing to the consuming and all points in between.

 

Food enthusiast, food fan(atic), food lover, &etc.

I'm with you and Jaymes. A proud foodie.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I am a FoodNerd,  but I am not a food snob, which sadly may foodies are.  


Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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As a reference point, people who suffer from a true addiction to food, the type that find themselves needing the help of Overeaters Anonymous, are also called foodies by some. It is not a term that bothers me but one I personally choose to avoid.

 

My serious enjoyment of food and its preparation needs no descriptive term, it just is what it is. I take the same delight in making a tasty baked tuna roll with white sauce as I do in turning out a tasty prime rib dinner. The proof of the pudding is in the eating.


Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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I prefer these terms.  

"The term gourmet may refer to a person with refined or discriminating taste who is knowledgeable in the craft and art of food and food preparation.%5B1%5D Gourmand carries additional connotations of one who simply enjoys food in great quantities. An epicure is similar to a gourmet, but the word may sometimes carry overtones of excessive refinement. A gourmet chef is a chef of particularly high caliber of cooking talent and skill."

"gourmand" also carries a pejorative connotation depending on context, to me. It's not a preferred term of mine.

I would rather just refer to people by their names than call them something that may not necessarily describe them. Much safer.

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When I here the word "foodie" I immediately think of food obsessed David Rosengarten (where I first heard the term ~20 years ago) and that's about it....I don't consider it either positive or negative.


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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My serious enjoyment of food and its preparation needs no descriptive term, it just is what it is.

 

I agree.


~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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I am a FoodNerd,  but I am not a food snob, which sadly may foodies are.

This is perfect. I think the pejorative "foodie" refers to the age of Yelpsters Instagraming every thing they eat to show they ate at the hottest new restaurant. I think egulleters are more the food nerd types. Always trying new foods and techniques. Often finding themselves eating something and thinking "I could do far better" and then doing so. We read widely from not only cook books but about the industry. Being called a food nerd by the wife of my pig roast partner was a compliment of the highest regard.

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How about a 'Doodie'?

 

http://www.grubstreet.com/2014/05/food-dude-doodies-and-the-women-who-love-them.html

 

Made me laugh, hit a little close to home.

I remember that article. It was a "thing" on social media when it came out.

"Why are you against deliciousness?" Josh asked indignantly a few months ago, when I said I didn't think he needed to make a special trip to get soppressata for a salad that already had like 20 things in it.

I'm not against "deliciousness", just everything-and-the-kitchen-sink syndrome.

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The Doodie article made me think of Tim Hayward who writes a food column most weeks for the FT Weekend magazine. Recently he's written on how modern dining trends are spoiling the pleasure of sharing a meal with someone special, on egotarian cooking and on the impact of the laminator on restaurant etiquette. Mr Hayward's weekly columns are one of the reasons I maintain my FT subscription although they all appear to be available legally and without charge on the FT site via this link.

http://www.ft.com/life-arts/tim-hayward

Worth glancing through if you have time, as are the recipes of Rowley Leigh (and his introductions) to be found on the same site.

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I've never understood people who don't respect cooking and eating, who consider the growing and preparation of food beneath them and eating a not very interesting but boringly necessary job.  Eating is a daily necessity, essential to our life and health, and something (most) people take pleasure in from the first moments of life to the end (in fact, I know many old folks who find eating to be one of their last surviving pleasures).  We have to do it, why not approach it in a thoughtful way and enjoy it? 

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