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raxelita

Cynar

170 posts in this topic

Some Italian cocktails with Cynar:

Cynar is an Italian traditional bitter liqueur.

Drink on the rocks with an orange zest or use it in cocktails.

Shake 1 part of Artichoke Liqueur (Cynar), 1 part of Curacao, 1 part of Cherry Ratafià, 3 parts of orange juice.

Pour the Cynar in a frozen flute and add 2 parts of dry white wine.

A typical Venetian aperitif: shake 1 part of Artichoke Liqueur, 1 part of Aperol (or Red Vermouth), 1 part of Dry Gin.

Pour over ice in a highball glass.

My recipe to make Artichoke Liqueur (Cynar):

Ingredients:

1 liter of alcohol at 95º

30 tender leaves of artichoke

1 lemon

5 artichoke stems

1 flowering tops of yarrow

2 cloves

1/2 liter of water

1 cups of sugar

1/2 liter of dry white wine

Wash the artichoke leaves in water and lemon.

Peel the stems and cut them in little cubes.

Put the spices, the artichoke stems and leaves and the alcohol in an airtight jar.

Let soak for 3 weeks.

Filter.

Make a syrup with the sugar and the water.

If you prefer a very bitter taste use only ¼ cup of sugar.

Add the syrup and the wine to the alcohol.

Bottle and let rest for 4 months.

Thanks for the recipe Olmoelisa. I like homemade things :smile:

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Some Italian cocktails with Cynar:

Cynar is an Italian traditional bitter liqueur.

Drink on the rocks with an orange zest or use it in cocktails.

Shake 1 part of Artichoke Liqueur (Cynar), 1 part of Curacao, 1 part of Cherry Ratafià, 3 parts of orange juice.

Pour the Cynar in a frozen flute and add 2 parts of dry white wine.

A typical Venetian aperitif: shake 1 part of Artichoke Liqueur, 1 part of Aperol (or Red Vermouth), 1 part of Dry Gin.

Pour over ice in a highball glass.

My recipe to make Artichoke Liqueur (Cynar):

Ingredients:

1 liter of alcohol at 95º

30 tender leaves of artichoke

1 lemon

5 artichoke stems

1 flowering tops of yarrow

2 cloves

1/2 liter of water

1 cups of sugar

1/2 liter of dry white wine

Wash the artichoke leaves in water and lemon.

Peel the stems and cut them in little cubes.

Put the spices, the artichoke stems and leaves and the alcohol in an airtight jar.

Let soak for 3 weeks.

Filter.

Make a syrup with the sugar and the water.

If you prefer a very bitter taste use only ¼ cup of sugar.

Add the syrup and the wine to the alcohol.

Bottle and let rest for 4 months.

Thank you for the recipe, olmoelisa.

How does its flavor compare to the commercially available Cynar?


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Thank you for the recipe, olmoelisa.

How does its flavor compare to the commercially available Cynar?

About the same.

Artichoke flavor is so strong it covers everything else.


My Italian Homemade Liqueurs and Pastries recipes at: http://italianliqueurs.blogspot.com.es

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Maloney No. 2

by John Durr of the Hawthorn Beverage Group in Louisville

1 1/2 oz Bourbon (Original recipe specifies bonded)

1 1/2 oz Sweet vermouth, Cocchi Vermouth di Torino

3/4 oz Cynar

1/2 oz Maraschino Liqueur

Stir with ice and strain into a rocks glass with ice; garnish with an orange peel twist

I served it up. I was delicious. The bitter herbs of the cynar seem to have a great affinity for maraschino liqueur. It did not taste overly bitter so I thought I might convert my husband to cynar, but he decided he did not care for it.

8756427972_e522961db5_z.jpg

FrogPrincesse, thanks for introducing me to this great tipple. Very tasty with Punt e Mes.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Making Cynar:

001 (480x640).jpg

My budget could only accommodate one artichoke so I divided the recipe :sad:

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Maloney No. 2

by John Durr of the Hawthorn Beverage Group in Louisville

1 1/2 oz Bourbon (Original recipe specifies bonded)

1 1/2 oz Sweet vermouth, Cocchi Vermouth di Torino

3/4 oz Cynar

1/2 oz Maraschino Liqueur

Stir with ice and strain into a rocks glass with ice; garnish with an orange peel twist

I served it up. I was delicious. The bitter herbs of the cynar seem to have a great affinity for maraschino liqueur. It did not taste overly bitter so I thought I might convert my husband to cynar, but he decided he did not care for it.

8756427972_e522961db5_z.jpg

I made this tonight and I'm sad to say I found it too sweet and Maraschino-y. I used the specified Cocchi Vermouth and Ridgemont Reserve 1792, which is ~94 proof. I added some Islay whisky which helped balance it a bit. Since you all like it so much I'll assume my palate is just out of whack. I've been drinking mostly wine and neat spirits, so any cocktail would probably strike me as sweet. Or maybe I'm just becoming Evergreen Dan and will soon shun and hiss at all things sweet.

Making Cynar:

My budget could only accommodate one artichoke so I divided the recipe :sad:

Glad you could find room in your budget for flowering tops of yarrow at least.


Edited by Rafa (log)

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Or maybe I'm just becoming Evergreen Dan and will soon shun and hiss at all things sweet

I like sssssssssssssssssssssssssweeet ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssometimesssssssssssssss.

2 people like this

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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You know, I might just sub dry red wine (Shiraz?) for the Cocchi. Wait.... am I going to have to give up my membership in the All Things Cocchi fanclub?

Thanks,

Zachary

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>Making Cynar:

My budget could only accommodate one artichoke so I divided the recipe :sad:

Glad you could find room in your budget for flowering tops of yarrow at least.

Just picked it for free. Got all sorts of mud and twigs around here. We don't all live in the Big Village you know.


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)

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Maloney No. 2

by John Durr of the Hawthorn Beverage Group in Louisville

1 1/2 oz Bourbon (Original recipe specifies bonded)

1 1/2 oz Sweet vermouth, Cocchi Vermouth di Torino

3/4 oz Cynar

1/2 oz Maraschino Liqueur

Stir with ice and strain into a rocks glass with ice; garnish with an orange peel twist

I served it up. I was delicious. The bitter herbs of the cynar seem to have a great affinity for maraschino liqueur. It did not taste overly bitter so I thought I might convert my husband to cynar, but he decided he did not care for it.

8756427972_e522961db5_z.jpg

I made this tonight and I'm sad to say I found it too sweet and Maraschino-y. I used the specified Cocchi Vermouth and Ridgemont Reserve 1792, which is ~94 proof. I added some Islay whisky which helped balance it a bit. Since you all like it so much I'll assume my palate is just out of whack. I've been drinking mostly wine and neat spirits, so any cocktail would probably strike me as sweet. Or maybe I'm just becoming Evergreen Dan and will soon shun and hiss at all things sweet.

Might try the variation Chris noted with Punt e Mes to see if that gets it back closer to balance for your palate.

Sounds tasty as written to me! Although might be worth trying using Rittenhouse rye as well.


Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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The Navy Dock Daiquiri, found on cocktail virgin slut blog. Decided to post this one in the Cynar thread rather than the daiquiri thread based on the flavor profile.

1.5 oz Smith & Cross Jamaica rum
3/4 oz Cynar
1/2 oz lime juice
1/4 oz maraschino liqueur

9079414939_5b79481b0f_z.jpg

Oil and smoke in a daiquiri base, with bonus funk from the maraschino.

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So the Navy Dock Daiquiri was another one in a series of cocktails combining cynar and maraschino. (See the Cynar What I Mean and Maloney No. 2 upthread).

Chris Hannah's Amertinez, also from the cocktail virgin slut blog, is, as it names indicates, a bitter Martinez with a touch of amaro.

1 1/4 oz gin
2/3 oz sweet vermouth

2/3 oz amaro (I used cynar)
1/4 oz maraschino liqueur
2 dashes orange bitters

9072916718_24dd857574_z.jpg

It's ginny, bitter, a bit sweet. It's a good sipper.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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Picked a name. Wedderburn is the heavy distillate used in Smith & Cross

Wedderburn or Bite
by Dan Chadwick
2 oz Cynar
1/2 oz Jamaican rum, Smith & Cross
1/2 oz Lemon juice

Shake, strain, rocks, lowball


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Picked a name. Wedderburn is the heavy distillate used in Smith & Cross

Wedderburn or Bite

by Dan Chadwick

2 oz Cynar

1/2 oz Jamaican rum, Smith & Cross

1/2 oz Lemon juice

Shake, strain, rocks, lowball

Well, I liked the name "Sexy Beast", but "Wedderburn or Bite" works too. :wink:

But if you are going to name it after a town just up the road from me, and since I don't have any Smith and Cross, you should know that Inner Circle works well in this.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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EvergreenDan's creation (still unnamed?)

2 oz Cynar1/2 oz Smith & Cross1/2 oz Lemon It's just like a Daiquiri, except that it's bitter, funky, lemony and nothing like a Daiquiri. But it's damn delicious.

9140553560_49ccb90d42_z.jpg It's very good indeed.
i made this today. Fantastic

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Replenished my supply of Cynar today, so I made up Dan's Wedderburn or Bite. Truly fantastic drink!


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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I mixed up the recipes for the Warning Label and the Teenage Riot tonight, and made this:

1 oz Lemon Hart 151

1 oz Cynar

1 oz Amontillado Sherry

Lemon twist.

Pretty good!


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I have a semi-regular guest that comes in and asks for a Negroni with Cynar rather than Campari. Slightly tweaked proportions, 1.5 gin:1 Cynar:1 M&R sweet vermouth. While the drink is not to my taste, others that have tried it think it's grand.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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On the topic of cynar (and salt), here is Christian Siglin's Milano Swizzle: gin, cynar, sweet vermouth, lemon juice, salt. It builds on the foundation of the Search for Delicious and adds gin. A great summer drink.

I was in the mood for rum and I'm out of sweet vermouth, so I made a variation of this with Lemon Hart 151 and Bonal, same ratios. Really nice.


Edited by Rafa (log)
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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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The Man Comes Around by Rafa.

10450640345_6b3545103e_z.jpg

His reputation is well deserved. He is really good.

You are too kind. Thank you for trying it. I'm glad our tastes aligned on this one.

If any of you haven't tried bostonapothecary's Alto Cucina yet, I highly recommend it. It's a model of balance, contemplative and delicious. And it's got a structure that lends itself to substitutions and experimentation.

1 person likes this

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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