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I wonder what the process is by which artichoke is incorporated in Cynar, and whether Cynar actually contains cynarin.

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I wonder what the process is by which artichoke is incorporated in Cynar, and whether Cynar actually contains cynarin.

This article says that it is the leaves that are used to make Cynar, not the flower...it references that the product is named for cynarin, but doesn't specifically state that there is any in the product.

Cynar's label features the familiar artichoke flower head associated with prickly challenge and soft vegetal pleasure, although the stuff inside is actually based on the plants' leaves ... The plants are grown in Macerata and Iesi, in the Italian province of Le Marche. ... After each plant has been relieved of the dozen or so flower heads it produces each spring, the leaves are cut and placed atop the open plant to dry in the summer sun. They are then distilled in a neutral spirit, along with 12 other botanicals whose type and relative proportions are a tightly guarded secret, as is always the case with "patent liqueurs."

Edited by KD1191 (log)

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. . . it references that the product is named for cynarin . . .

I'm going to go ahead and suggest that the article is incorrect in this assertion. Rather, let me suggest that the product is named after the Latin name for the globe artichoke, Cynara scolymus. I'll further suggest that cynarin is also named after the Latin genus, not the other way around.

By the way: Ever wonder how it is that cardoons look kind of like celery but taste kind of like artichoke? The cardoon is also in the Cynara genus, having the Latin name Cynara cardunculus.

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let me suggest that the product is named after the Latin name for the globe artichoke, Cynara scolymus.  I'll further suggest that cynarin is also named after the Latin genus, not the other way around.

That article does first mention the Latin name for the plant, Cynara scolymus, before going on to specifically make the claim that the liqueur takes its name from cynarin. I have no idea who the author of the article was or its provenance, but it's possible there's a valid source behind the assertion.

Perhaps the creators were trying to cash in on the supposed health effects of cynarin (i.e. "Cynar: against the stress of modern life."), or it's more than likely that it's just some sloppy journalism.

In any case, as you quite rightly point out, cynarin obviously takes its name from Cynara scolymus, so of course does Cynar...either in one step or two.

Unfortunately, that doesn't really answer the question of whether there is any cynarin in the stuff. These pages each claim that there is...


Edited by KD1191 (log)

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Anything new on the Cynar front in the last couple years? I've got about 3/4 of a bottle on the shelf that I'd like to use up to make room for ... something else.

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Anything new on the Cynar front in the last couple years? I've got about 3/4 of a bottle on the shelf that I'd like to use up to make room for ... something else.

Chris,

The rogue/beta cocktail book has quite a few Cynar drinks so you may want to look into that. The Art of Choke (already mentioned in this thread), The Bitter Giuseppe, Eeyor's Requiem, The Italian Heirloom, The Search for Delicious, Teenage Riot, Transatlantic Giant, The Last Mechanical Art, The Warning Label, etc.

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Yea, Cynar (like Chartreuse before it) was seriously over-employed in cocktails for several years there. There are zillions of recipes calling for Cynar.

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The Cin Cyn from Babbo: 2 oz gin (Junipero), 1/2 oz sweet vermouth (recipe specifies Cinzano, I used Carpano Antica), 1/2 oz Cynar, orange bitters (I used Regan and Angostura), orange twist.

Very similar to a Negroni, although sans Campari.

6819775712_69d508a89b_z.jpg

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I've also heard that called Gin-Cin-Cyn (like Rin Tin Tin, I suppose). But I see Cin Cyn discussed here: Sloshed

I have made it Negroni-style, with equal proportions. It's a nice -- if obvious -- drink.

Does anyone know the true creator? I only noted "Washington Post" as my source when I originally noted the cocktail (pre-Kindred Cocktails days).

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The Cin Cyn (so named because of the use of Cinzano vermouth and Cynar) came from Babbo.

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I'm sure I'm not the first person to ever do this, but here's what I mixed up last night:

1.5 oz. Kittling Ridge brandy (from the same distiller as Forty Creek whisky; kind of Spanish in style, to my palate)

0.5 oz. Cynar

0.5 oz. amontillado sherry

2 dashes Regan's orange bitters

Stir, strain, up. Probably would have been nice with an orange twist, but I didn't have one. I quite enjoyed the drink anyway.

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Thanks, Sam. I guess I can't fight the authentic recipe (2:1/2:1/2 + OJ), but the Negroni-style is awesome. I reluctantly changed KC to the authentic version and moved the Negroni-style ratio to the variation. I made it two nights ago with Punt e Mes, which of courses messed up the cute name. Delicious.

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Here is a cocktail on the spring list at The Violet Hour. It is the work of a very talented bartender there who goes by Kyle.

The Art of Choke

1 oz Appleton White

1 oz Cynar

.25 oz Green Chartreuse

.25 oz Fresh Lime Juice

.25 oz Simple Syrup

3 Mint Sprig

Glass: Rocks

Garnish: 2 Mint Sprigs

Ice: Chunk

Muddle 1 mint sprig dry. Add rest of the ingredients. Stir. Strain. Serve over fresh ice.

Not for the faint of heart. But if you like Cynar already this cocktail is mindblowing.

Toby

I just tried this recipe. It's great. I had the Cyn Cin last night. It tasted like a Negroni to me. You're right about this one not being for the faint of heart. I made a Corn and Oil for my brother and sister to try. It was way too strong for them. This one falls in the same category. Of course, I like straight espresso

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I had a bad-ass cocktail at Back Bar in Somerville, MA. I asked for something bitter, and got Ponte Vecchio. I've e-mailed for the correct quantities, but I think it was 1 1/4 each Fernet and Cynar and about 1/4 to 1/2 lemon. I'm guessing 1/2 because it was quite tart. Shaken up, coupe.

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I had a bad-ass cocktail at Back Bar in Somerville, MA. I asked for something bitter, and got Ponte Vecchio. I've e-mailed for the correct quantities, but I think it was 1 1/4 each Fernet and Cynar and about 1/4 to 1/2 lemon. I'm guessing 1/2 because it was quite tart. Shaken up, coupe.

Please share when you find out... I really want to try this one. I like Cynar, I love Fernet, tart is always nice.

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Confirmed:

Ponte Vecchio

by Sam Treadway, Backbar, Somerville, MA

1 1/4 oz Fernet Branca

1 1/4 oz Cynar

1/2 oz Lemon juice

Stir, double strain, straight up, chilled coupe, no garnish

The Sloppy Possum from Lord Hobo, Cambridge, MA is essentially the same drink with Canton (although I like it even better with King's Ginger). I was surprised how the Cynar stood up to the Fernet.

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Confirmed:

Ponte Vecchio

by Sam Treadway, Backbar, Somerville, MA

1 1/4 oz Fernet Branca

1 1/4 oz Cynar

1/2 oz Lemon juice

Stir, double strain, straight up, chilled coupe, no garnish

The Sloppy Possum from Lord Hobo, Cambridge, MA is essentially the same drink with Canton (although I like it even better with King's Ginger). I was surprised how the Cynar stood up to the Fernet.

Just tried this. This is a yes. Very much so.

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Thanks, Sam. I guess I can't fight the authentic recipe (2:1/2:1/2 + OJ), but the Negroni-style is awesome. I reluctantly changed KC to the authentic version and moved the Negroni-style ratio to the variation. I made it two nights ago with Punt e Mes, which of courses messed up the cute name. Delicious.

Just a note that there is no orange juice in the Cin Cyn recipe in the Babbo cookbook. The rest of the recipe is identical to what you entered in the Kindred Cocktails database, with the gin specified as Junipero.

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Thanks, Sam. I guess I can't fight the authentic recipe (2:1/2:1/2 + OJ), but the Negroni-style is awesome. I reluctantly changed KC to the authentic version and moved the Negroni-style ratio to the variation. I made it two nights ago with Punt e Mes, which of courses messed up the cute name. Delicious.

Just a note that there is no orange juice in the Cin Cyn recipe in the Babbo cookbook. The rest of the recipe is identical to what you entered in the Kindred Cocktails database, with the gin specified as Junipero.

Right. Babbo cookbook has it as 2 oz Junipero, 1/2 oz Cynar, 1/2 oz Cinzano sweet vermouth, orange bitters, orange twist.

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Does Babbo have the Cyn Cin as shaken or stirred? I read shaken elsewhere, but I'd guess that was because of the unauthentic addition of the OJ. Thanks for your help. It's tough to get to the bottom of an authentic recipe sometimes.

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Confirmed:

Ponte Vecchio

by Sam Treadway, Backbar, Somerville, MA

1 1/4 oz Fernet Branca

1 1/4 oz Cynar

1/2 oz Lemon juice

Stir, double strain, straight up, chilled coupe, no garnish

The Sloppy Possum from Lord Hobo, Cambridge, MA is essentially the same drink with Canton (although I like it even better with King's Ginger). I was surprised how the Cynar stood up to the Fernet.

Thanks! Didn't get to it last night, I already had a couple rum drinks lined up to try and usually call it a night at two unless something special is going on, but it's next in line.

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Frog - I'm enjoying your pictures and recipes, but I'd be even more interested to hear your tasting notes and thoughts about the cocktails!

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