Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Wattle they put in beer next?


Recommended Posts

Introducing flavors into beer may be sacreligious to some but when that ingredient imparts some functionality, I believe it should be well considered.

Wattleseed in both ground or extract form is becoming a force in flavors as an ingredient in ice cream, cream, sauces and now brewing.

While some devotees have attempted to introduce Wattleseed (which is a roasted seed from the genus Acacia) into the wort as a fermentable, economy suggest there must be a better way. The extract has been used in commercial trials in Australia and added post-brewing and pre-pasteurization. At 1% addition to a light bodied beer, Wattleseed enhances the intrinsic qualities of the brew only expressing its own flavor late on the palate. The result is that the beer exhibits a subtle coffee, chocolate, hazelnut character ending in a very clean finish effectively wiping any residual hop bitterness from the tongue. This means the palate is made ready for the full flavor of the following sip and drinkers do not get that 'furry tongue' feel of hop build up. It makes a true cleansing ale.

Introducing innovative Australian ingredients to creative chefs, cooks and foodies.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely. If we want to talk about flavoring beer with innovative and creative ingredients, we should get Sam Calgione from Dogfish Head in on this discussion. He is the Master!

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Absolutely.  If we want to talk about flavoring beer with innovative and creative ingredients, we should get Sam Calgione from Dogfish Head in on this discussion.  He is the Master!

I only know them from the 90 and 120 min. We don't get their beers up here. But, I love those that I've tried.

Oh, and the world wide stout, that was amazing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

But, but, but, I want that hop build up. I pay good money for that hop build up and flavor. Otherwise I would drink Budweiser.

Regards,

Michael Lloyd

Mill Creek, Washington USA

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, if I happen to be reading the label and it says "New and Improved -- contains wattleseeds!", I'm not going to necessarily stop drinking the ale. I'm always looking for a new flavor note in my beer/ale just for variety's sake. But if I'm in the marketing department, I'm going to be looking for a better name for it than wattleseeds.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“A favorite dish in Kansas is creamed corn on a stick.”

-Jeff Harms, actor, comedian.

>Enjoying every bite, because I don't know any better...

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if anyone in the Southwestern US or Mexico has ever tried doing something similar with Mesquite seeds. I know they are also edible, sweet, and high in protein.

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      It seems that the legendary traditional appearance and accoutrements of witches may have actually risen because they were conjuring up beer rather than malign entities from beyond.
       
       
      The full article is here.
       
    • By liuzhou
      Picked this up this morning, not because I wanted it, just to add to my collection of silliness.
       

       
       
       
      Love the brewery's honesty in their choice of name.
       
      My only question is "Why? I mean "Why?'" (to be uttered in a tone of despair).
       
      It tastes like some one had a glass of grapefruit juice with breakfast and then forgot to wash the glass before pouring a beer hours later.
       
    • By liuzhou
      500 years ago, Martin Luther started off the Reformation. In a way, this not only changed religious affairs in Europe, but also changed our beer.
       
      Article here.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...