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I love vinegar on chips, my mother swears by it to clean her windows.

What do you use vinegar for?

(Posted in the UK thread as the UK is the highest consumer of vinegar).

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on cheese on toast and on cauliflower cheese - has to be malt, of course

n

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I find that it can be quite useful in salad dressings. Try mixing with oil.

It's also very good to get rid of hiccups.


Suzi Edwards aka "Tarka"

"the only thing larger than her bum is her ego"

Blogito ergo sum

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I can't stand to eat more than a few of those vinegar chips. Yuck. Let's see...recently I've used vinegar to mix with baking soda (wasn't anything spectacular), clean my coffee maker, and I think I used apple cider vinegar for some recipes I don't recall. And yep, vinegar cleans windows pretty good - helps reduce streaks too I think.

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I love vinegar on chips, my mother swears by it to clean her windows.

What do you use vinegar for?

(Posted in the UK thread as the UK is the highest consumer of vinegar).

Vinegar, I love vinegar.

Baked potato with red wine vinegar is great, reminds me of boardwalk french fries, chips to you all, which in the States are a big summer time treat.

Apple cider vinegar isahugew ingredientin my mustard based barbecue sauce.

It is also good for keeping themoldoffof my chorizo that is curing in the basement.

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To complicate matters further, there are varieties of vinegar. :rolleyes:

For chips, I prefer the vinegar that has pickled the onions.

I've also been told that vinegar is good for tired feet. Who knew?

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On mushy peas. Mmmmm


The quest for perfection will lead you to role models that will last you for life (Nico Ladenis)

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Chips - white vinegar. Potato chips (crisps?) are best when salt and vinegar flavoured.

Balsamic, cider, red wine, white, etc. all make good salad dressing.

Acid is good.

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For pickling and also good for wasp stings!!


http://www.allium.uk.net

http://alliumfood.wordpress.com/ the alliumfood blog

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, champagne in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming - Whey hey what a ride!!!, "

Sarah Poli, Firenze, Kibworth Beauchamp

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I just found a recipe for a drink made with made with maple vinegar, from a Canadian book of 1857:

In the hot weather, a nice cooling drink can be made with a quart of hot water, a large spoonful of maple syrup, and as much vinegar as will sharpen it; when quite cold, grate a little nutmeg on it, or drop in a little essence of lemon, to flavour it. This is very refreshing in harvest weather.

The recipe follows the instructions for making the maple vinegar itself, and I have posted it at <a href = "http://theoldfoodie.blogspot.com/2006/07/extra-extra-maple-syrup-and-canada-day.html/">Canada Day and Maple Syrup</a>

Sounds delicious! Is maple vinegar still made and sold in Canada? I got absolutely addicted to maple syrup on a short visit a few years ago. We can buy it here but no real choice of quality or range.


Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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On mushy peas. Mmmmm

Spot on. There is something generally great about pulse / acid mixes (like hummous) but the mushy pea and vinegar combination is exemplary.

Is there a class thing here when it comes to vinegar on chips?

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For food poisoning - teaspoon of apple cider vinegar in a small glass of water

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Is there a class thing here when it comes to vinegar on chips?

I thought the high class chip shops were the ones that offered vinegar. Low class chip shops have non-brewed condiment coloured with E150.

I think it's a matter of the type of chips really. Chip shop chips require vinegar and lots of salt, which must both be applied prior to wrapping. Vinegar on any other type of chip, french fry or other sort of fried potato is quite unacceptable, and is responsible for making pubs smell of vinegar at lunchtimes.


Ian

I go to bakeries, all day long.

There's a lack of sweetness in my life...

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For food poisoning - teaspoon of apple cider vinegar in a small glass of water

Why on earth would you want to give yourself food poisoning?

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Sounds delicious! Is maple vinegar still made and sold in Canada?  I got absolutely addicted to maple syrup on a short visit a few years ago. We can buy it here but no real choice of quality or range.

I grew up in Canada, and I've never heard of it. Sounds interesting though - next time I'm back I'll keep an eye out for it. I suspect that if it's still made, it's the kind of thing that never makes it to larger markets, that you can only buy directly from the sugar shack.

Vinegar (white or malt) for chips, all kinds for salad dressings. I often add a shot to soups as well.


Cutting the lemon/the knife/leaves a little cathedral:/alcoves unguessed by the eye/that open acidulous glass/to the light; topazes/riding the droplets,/altars,/aromatic facades. - Ode to a Lemon, Pablo Neruda

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Why on earth would you want to give yourself food poisoning?


Edited by beaker (log)

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My mum always used to have a drop of vinegar on poached eggs  - although never really convinced by that one!

I thought that vinegar in the poached egg cooking water was supposed to keep the whites together: that's how my dad made them. Now a poached egg without a vinegar whiff just tastes wrong to me.

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Is there a class thing here when it comes to vinegar on chips?

I thought the high class chip shops were the ones that offered vinegar. Low class chip shops have non-brewed condiment coloured with E150.

When I was little you could tell which side of the tracks people came from by whether they vinegared chips fried at home. Posh meant no vinegar. I liked licking my lips.

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Proper, strong English vinegar on chips (uh, fries) is excellent -- the kind that if you were to put your nose over it and inhale the aromas, your face would just shrivel -- now, that's the stuff. Can't get it over here though :/

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Proper, strong English vinegar on chips (uh, fries) is excellent -- the kind that if you were to put your nose over it and inhale the aromas, your face would just shrivel -- now, that's the stuff. Can't get it over here though :/

Do you mean malt vinegar? Last time I was in the US I picked up some London Pub Olde English Malt Vinegar. I'm not sure if it's the stuff you speak of, but I got it at Walmart.

In the UK is it always malt vinegar on chips? Here, all restaurants that sell chips/fries have white vinegar on the tables (or in packets if a fast food place).

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In the UK is it always malt vinegar on chips?  Here, all restaurants that sell chips/fries have white vinegar on the tables (or in packets if a fast food place).

It is always malt vinegar in the north of England, on thick pea soup or pease pudding too.

How about English mint sauce for lamb? vinegar (malt where I come from), bit of sugar, and lots of chopped fresh mint. I dont know how I forgot that one.

then there is chili vinegar as a dip for Asian style dishes, and raspberry vinegar in the chick pea salad that I posted somewhere else.


Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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In my home town we always use vinegar on pancakes rather than orange or lemon-goes back to wartime shortages.Give it a try, I wouldn't use anything else.

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How about English mint sauce for lamb?

Can't stand it! Lived in England of 15 years & am married to a Geordie, but never got used to mint sauce on lamb.

Now, malt vinegar on my chips; that's the way to go.

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Cider vinegar, hot water & honey is good for aching joints - I have no idea why, but it definitely works - and I like the taste too.

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