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Duck Eggs


Mussina
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Use them as you would chicken eggs (e.g. omelets, fried, poached, scrambled etc.) They are a little bit richer than good quality chicken eggs. Now goose eggs are on another level completely. They are indeed rich.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

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Make a decadently yummy salad -

Boil them for 8 minutes. Allow to cool a little and then shell. Serve them cut into quarters with some cold french beans in a walnut oil vinaigrette. If you have some cooked pancetta as well even better. Delicious.

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  • 1 month later...

I now have some fresh ducks eggs. I found an Asain market that carries them. I did an eG search and was happy to find this topic. I wanted to ask that if anybody else has more ideas to add to these good ones, please do post.

And, another question... The market also carries duck eggs that have baby ducks in them. I like to try new things, so I bought one. :shock::unsure: The lady told me that most people boil them slowly. I'm not sure if I am going to get up the nerve to do this, but I want to. Can anyone please give input? Has anyone eaten eggs with baby duck in them? If so, how, and why? The "why" may sound like a stupid question, but I am wondering if it's an Asian tradition of some kind, or if there is any reason other than my own (to try something unusual) for anyone to eat this.

BTW, I ate chicken feet last night in a Chinese restaurant in the same area of Orlando. That was a new one on me.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Susan

Its called Balut, it is I believe a Philipino dish....since I know no more than that first hand ......you are on your own

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

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I now have some fresh ducks eggs.  I found an Asain market that carries them.  I did an eG search and was happy to find this topic.  I wanted to ask that if anybody else has more ideas to add to these good ones, please do post.

And, another question...  The market also carries duck eggs that have baby ducks in them.  I like to try new things, so I bought one.  :shock:  :unsure:  The lady told me that most people boil them slowly.  I'm not sure if I am going to get up the nerve to do this, but I want to.  Can anyone please give input?  Has anyone eaten eggs with baby duck in them?  If so, how, and why?  The "why" may sound like a stupid question, but I am wondering if it's an Asian tradition of some kind, or if there is any reason other than my own (to try something unusual) for anyone to eat this.

BTW, I ate chicken feet last night in a Chinese restaurant in the same area of Orlando.  That was a new one on me.

Thai duck egg crab omelet is another alternative...it is also on the menu at Kittichai in New York.

Simply whip up the egg until foamy...add fresh crab meat...season with fish sauce...Then fry in plenty of oil until crisp on the outside...serve with Hot steamed rice and Sriracha chilli sauce.

Also...the preserved duck egg...this is chinese but also common in Thai meals.

use brine 1 cup salt:4 Cups water..boil and leave to cool.

Place eggs in glass jar...pour the brine in the jar to cover the eggs which will float..weigh it down with a plastice bag filled with water.

Leave in cool place for 3 weeks...when done the eggs will start to sink.

At this stage the egg will not be that salty.

The eggs can also be left in brine for 1-2 more weeks...the white will be quite salty but with perfect yolks...

When ready, drain and boil.

The perfect yolks will have orange oil coming out.

These eggs are to be condiment for Thai curries, having with boiled rice or making Thai style salad.

I use only the yolk though.

Duck eggs are firmer than chicken's so it is crispier.

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A Vietnamese guy told me that balut are popular with newlyweds--I'm not sure if it's to improve their fertility or their libidos.

I used to get regular duck eggs all the time when they had them at our co-op, and liked them for everything but scrambled eggs. I like my scrambled eggs more dry/fluffy than creamy/slimy, and duck eggs don't seem to lose their sliminess.

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I've always used them with asparagus alla Milanese -- sunny side up egg, a bit of risotto, and some sauteed or broiled asparagus. Duck eggs are bigger than chicken eggs, so it helps to round out the meal.

I've never really noticed much of a taste difference; I think the richness comes from having so much more yolk.

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The market also carries duck eggs that have baby ducks in them.  I like to try new things, so I bought one.  :shock:  :unsure:  The lady told me that most people boil them slowly.  I'm not sure if I am going to get up the nerve to do this, but I want to.  Can anyone please give input?  Has anyone eaten eggs with baby duck in them?  If so, how, and why?  The "why" may sound like a stupid question, but I am wondering if it's an Asian tradition of some kind, or if there is any reason other than my own (to try something unusual) for anyone to eat this.

I found this about balut on wikipedia. These photos are NOT for the faint of heart. I'm not usually squeamish when it comes to food, but this... :shock:

Edited by I_call_the_duck (log)

Karen C.

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Yeah, I read that, too. I don't know if I can do this.

Thanks for all the ideas for duck eggs. I have had no trouble using them up! I will try to post some photos... I've had some really good pasta, salad, breakfasts, and more. The only thing left is The One Egg for Balut. Yikes, I don't know... I have cooked it, but haven't brought myself to crack it open yet.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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  • 1 year later...

I was pleasantly surprised this evening when I found fresh duck eggs (beside the balut eggs - :blink: ) in our little Asian grocery store. Not having seen them for such a long time, I bought two dozen!

Now, what can I make with them? In the past, I've salted them for Chinese joongzi, but that season is past. Besides, I can buy salted duck eggs at Superstore.

Ideas?

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Duck eggs aren't all that different from regular eggs other than being a bit larger, and having a richer, more "eggy" flavor. You can use them exactly as you would regular eggs, but to appreciate them fully you might try sticking to simple preparations that highlight the flavor of the eggs themselves.

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Duck eggs aren't all that different from regular eggs other than being a bit larger, and having a richer, more "eggy" flavor.  You can use them exactly as you would regular eggs, but to appreciate them fully you might try sticking to simple preparations that highlight the flavor of the eggs themselves.

These eggs are quite a bit bigger than the x-tra large eggs I normally buy.

According to Google:

They are often used in dessert recipes due to their richness and gelatinous properties. Unfortunately, these same properties arise from a high fat content and a cholesterol level even higher than that of the quail's egg.

I bought packaged cooked duck eggs when I was making joongzi (only kind available at that time :sad: ), and I found the yolk was surrounded by a ring of oil - richer taste.

In light of what Gabriel and Google said, I'll probably use some in a sweet custard pie and also make a steamed Chinese custard with salted duck eggs.

But, new suggestions are always welcomed as I don't think I'll use up all 24 by next weekend. :wink:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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There are some really interesting-looking, although laborious, recipes for egg yolk-based sweets in Thompson's Thai Food, maybe it's worth looking around in there. He mentions that they can be made with chicken eggs, but duck eggs give a much superior result.

Edited by willows (log)
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You could make these:

Larks in Shells.

Boil twelve Hen or Duck Eggs soft; take out all the Inside, making a handsome Round at the Top; then fill half the Shells with passed Crumbs, and roast your Larks; put one in every Shell, and fill your Plate with passed Crumbs brown; so serve as Eggs in Shells.

[The lady's companion: or, an infallible guide to the fair sex. Containing, rules, directions, and observations, for their conduct and behaviour ... The second edition. London, 1740]

Supply of larks might be a problem though.

Otherwise, here is a Pound Cake recipe:

Pound Cake

4 cups sifted all purpose flour

1 tsp. baking powder

½ tsp. salt

2 cups butter or margarine

1 cup milk

2 tsp. lemon or vanilla extract, or 1 of each

3 cups sugar

6 duck eggs or 10 hen eggs

Sift the flour, baking powder and salt together, set aside. Have butter, milk and eggs at room temperature. Cream butter until very light and fluffy then add sugar gradually, creaming all the while. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each one.

Combine milk and flavoring. Add dry ingredients alternately with the milk, beginning and ending with the dry ingredients. Do this in four or five additions.

Pour into a well greased and floured bundt pan and a small loaf pan.

Bake at 300 degrees for one hour and 20 minutes

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

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My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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Thanks all!

I'll pass on the balut and larks in the shell. :blink: There were balut eggs beside the duck eggs in the cooler. Not sure I'm ready to try those. And yes, larks are short in supply at the moment.

I've copied down the sponge cake and pound cake recipes, and they will be something for me to try.

I was told that they have a gamey taste. Would that taste come thru' in the "most luxuious pasta"?

I think I'll try one for breakfast tomorrow - poached and broken over mix field greens with a bit of mango dressing.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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