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Ordered My Pork Pinkish (medium rare)


weinoo
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Whatever you say, thermometer shmermometer however.  It all depends on alot more than thickness.

hmmm, i'm not sure what you're saying. but the "push" you get does depend on thickness. it's a matter of retained heat and that depends on mass. big pieces will increase internal temperature longer after removal from the heat than small pieces. that's all i was saying.

and boy molto, that is the reddest, "grainiest" pork i've ever seen. if you hadn't told me different, i would have sworn that was beef. amazing stuff.

I know what you're saying, though I've never called it a "push", just a "rest". That depends on thickness, also has alot to do with method, type and cut of meat as well. IMHO, Pork cooked to whatever doneness, possibly not a true rare as above (looks alot like wild boar), and any meat cooked medium or greater is better suited to a slow fire. Pork especially stays juicy for a long range of internal temp, and isn't that what we are really talking about here, with a measured treatment over a slow fire/indirect source of heat. Also a slow heat virtually eliminates the need for a rest, I still rest don't get me wrong, it's just much less important than, say, if you were cooking lamb to medium rare with direct heat however.

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Re: docsconz's comment above, I once knew a physician who offered to send me all kinds of literature about parasites when I mentioned that I love sushi.  :huh:

I had sushi for dinner last night :wink: None of it was right off the boat.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I found a good way to have a pork chop pink but still cooked is through sous vide.. Here is an example I had recently at the Tasting Room... The thing was absolutely awesome.. Served with potatoes and fried chopped kale..

gallery_15057_2971_145990.jpg

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I had this Presa de Iberico al Aceite de regaliz, cintas de patatas,y boniato con chufa/ Pork shoulder, marinated tomato, oxalis and onion cube

at Akelare in San Sebastian:

I was surprised it was cooked to this temperature, but it was delicious.

Wow, this is for me, molto e!!! Yes, it somehow always seems that the Europeans are light years ahead of the Americans in their free thinking and spirit. I too, would love this dish, as I love steak and most meats cooked rare, or "bleu" as the French call it.

Any chef refusing to cook pork this way is a living anachronism, not aware that the trichinosis threat disappeared about 25 years ago. This is really a matter of personal taste. If I like it rare, I should be able to have it prepared that way!

Now, in some fine restaurants in France (and the US) I have heard of chefs refusing to cook meats well done. But refusing a "rare" request is bizarre, IMHO.

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Now, in some fine restaurants in France (and the US) I have heard of chefs refusing to cook meats well done.  But refusing a "rare" request is bizarre, IMHO.

No more bizarre than refusing a well done request...

"It's better to burn out than to fade away"-Neil Young

"I think I hear a dingo eating your baby"-Bart Simpson

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It really depends on the quality of meat as well as the type of pork served. I would imagine the iberico pig served above has a very different flavor than that of other heirloom varieties or your typical pig sold in the supermarket. Different pigs have different fat content, flavor, texture, etc. Just eat what tastes good, why care what temperature it is. Eating things more on the rare side just for the sake of having your food closer to a raw state is silly; it doesn't make you any more of a food intellectual.

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It really depends on the quality of meat as well as the type of pork served.  I would imagine the iberico pig served above has a very different flavor than that of other heirloom varieties or your typical pig sold in the supermarket.  Different pigs have different fat content, flavor, texture, etc.  Just eat what tastes good, why care what temperature it is.  Eating things more on the rare side just for the sake of having your food closer to a raw state is silly; it doesn't make you any more of a food intellectual.

Well, absolutely, that would be silly; but, based on your deductions here, are folks who love steak tartare in Mensa??!!

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