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Guy Savoy versus Robuchon


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Though our blow-out trip to Vegas isn't until October I'm already driving myself nuts trying to decide on our BIG DINNER.

We have a reservation at Guy Savoy but hearing the costs for the tasting menu/drinks, etc. I don't see this as a possibility.

Looking around online it seems Joel Robuchon has a smaller tasting menu that might be affordable if we're careful with the wine selection...

Has anyone been to both and can give a comparison in costs/ food/service/overall experience? I've read conflicting accounts of the costs...

Our goal is to sqeak by at about $500 total for two and perhaps that's just not possible and we should cancel GS and just forget about those two places.

I know I'm making this even more difficult by saying I'm not thrilled with the idea of having to order a la carte and having a short-evening at either restaurant. I'd much rather go back to Bradley Ogden where I've had great tasting menu experiences and know we're not going to go over about $400 for two...unless the price has gone up dramatically since last year.

This meal will be my 'birthday dinner' and I'm trying to find the balance of going somewhere new and special versus having to worry about what it's costing. I really, really enjoy the tasting menu approach..so that's part of the dilemna. I looked at L'Atelier and that's not an option.

Thanks for any advice!

--------------------

Char

Never let the fear of striking out

get in your way.

Babe Ruth

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I just returned from Vegas and originally had a reservation at Robuchon but changed it to Guy Savoy at the last minute. While we did opt for the tasting menu which ran $290 each, I was surprised to see on the menu they did have an a la carte menu.

We changed from Robuchon to Savoy after seeing mixed reviews of it on here and on a few other sites. The big deciding factor though was the fact Guy was in the kitchen and overseeing things.

That said the meal was amazing. In the end the 9 course menu turned into 13. Unfortunately I can't remember the dishes right now, but the amount of truffles and fois in the courses really made it special.

john

John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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Haven't been to GS so this will be a somewhat incomplete answer. We got out of Robuchon for somewhere between $500 and $600 (I'm thinking around $560) with the short tasting menu and modest wine (A full bottle of white burgundy in the $70-80 range and a half bottle of Bandol around $30 to $40 - there may have been a couple of glasses of Champagne in there also). So you can do it on the outside upper end of your price range - however, I'm probably much more likely to return to Bradley Ogden than to repeat at Robuchon at this point.

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Funny this topic comes up, as I was just about to post a question about this. I am off to Vegas in a few days, and am still not sure whether I should go for the Mansion at Joel or Guy Savoy. We are planning to have one all-out extravagent dinner, so price is not really a deciding factor. As of yesterday, I decided on Joel, but now I am wavering (again). Input?

To FoodieGirl: Have you tried Alex at the Wynn Hotel? Prior to Robuchon and Savoy coming in town, I considered his restaurant to be the top table in Vegas. I am sure you could get out for under 500 for two people and have a lovely evening. (Forgive me if you have already posted about Alex.)

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Robin: I was feeling encouraged by your post until the very end about Bradley Ogden. So, I have to conclude that you didn't LOVE your dinner Robuchon??

I have been to Bradley Ogden twice and did the big tasting menus...cocktails and very moderately priced bottle of wine for $400 total for two (with tax/tip). Now last time was 9 months ago so it may have gone up...but still would be a fantastic meal for under $500...about half of a similar number of courses at either GS or Robuchon..

M&M: See how confusing this is...LOL.

Yes indeedy I have been to ALEX...twice in fact. I probably posted it somewhere. I agree it's fantastic.

The problem is I've been to most of the really good existing restaurants at least twice so we are hoping to try something new.

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I don't know much about the Vegas outposts of these restaurants but I can say that as much as I like Robuchon, Guy Savoy was responsible for the best meal I've had in my life thus far.

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You're right, FG - I loved the dining room, and the wines were terrific (I always appreciate being able to drink well for a reasonable sum at a restaurant of that caliber), but the food was a bit austere and cerebral - no luxury ingredients whatsoever (not a hint of foie gras, truffles, or caviar, even though this was in December), very subtle, lacking in the sort of fireworks I always hope for (and that I remember experiencing in spades at my one dinner with Robuchon in Paris).

I should probably rephrase my original post - I might actually go back to Robuchon before Bradley Ogden, but that's mainly due to history - he completely blew me away in Paris, and I probably need to give him one more chance to do it here. Also, if I was planning a special occasion blowout Robuchon would not be my first choice - for me, it's always more fun to go to a place I can afford to really indulge than to push the limits and feel like I have to skimp. If you do go, I strongly recommend requesting a table in the main dining room rather than the "garden room" on the side.

Good luck resolving your dilemna!

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You're right, FG - I loved the dining room, and the wines were terrific (I always appreciate being able to drink well for a reasonable sum at a restaurant of that caliber), but the food was a bit austere and cerebral - no luxury ingredients whatsoever (not a hint of foie gras, truffles, or caviar, even though this was in December), very subtle, lacking in the sort of fireworks I always hope for (and that I remember experiencing in spades at my one dinner with Robuchon in Paris).

I should probably rephrase my original post - I might actually go back to Robuchon before Bradley Ogden, but that's mainly due to history - he completely blew me away in Paris, and I probably need to give him one more chance to do it here.  Also, if I was planning a special occasion blowout Robuchon would not be my first choice - for me, it's always more fun to go to a place I can afford to really indulge than to push the limits and feel like I have to skimp.  If you do go, I strongly recommend requesting a table in the main dining room rather than the "garden room" on the side.

Good luck resolving your dilemna!

***Thanks, Robin. More "food" for thought...(-:

Yes, it's the idea of having to scrimp that is putting a damper on the idea of going to either JR or GS. At Alex or Bradley Ogden I don't have to worry about the cost...it's within my comfort zone and, based on my past experiences, a guaranteed great meal.

Edited by Foodie-Girl (log)
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One thing to always consider: the raw materials that are found in a Las Vegas "French" kitchen can never match that which is found in Paris, no matter the chef.

"Hey, Joel/Guy/Alain/Daniel, come to Vegas, you guys will make a killing..."

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One thing to always consider: the raw materials that are found in a Las Vegas "French" kitchen can never match that which is found in Paris, no matter the chef.

"Hey, Joel/Guy/Alain/Daniel, come to Vegas, you guys will make a killing..."

This is simply not true. I can guarantee that both restaurants are working with only the best, world class ingredients that have been carefully sourced. In fact Mr. Savoy has gone on the record as saying he won't serve beef in his Paris restaurant because he can't get good product in France, but he it's on the menu in Vegas because he has better access to American beef.

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One thing to always consider: the raw materials that are found in a Las Vegas "French" kitchen can never match that which is found in Paris, no matter the chef.

"Hey, Joel/Guy/Alain/Daniel, come to Vegas, you guys will make a killing..."

This is simply not true. I can guarantee that both restaurants are working with only the best, world class ingredients that have been carefully sourced. In fact Mr. Savoy has gone on the record as saying he won't serve beef in his Paris restaurant because he can't get good product in France, but he it's on the menu in Vegas because he has better access to American beef.

What is the best? You can't get beluga caviar in the US these days (legally). Is the foie gras goose foie gras - or the duck that everyone and his mother serves here (menus that I saw don't say). And do I really want old turbot flown in from Europe?

I am not sure what you are getting for your money (and it is a *lot* of money - I read an excellent review of Robuchon's place where the writer spent about $3000 for 2 for dinner - he wasn't pinching pennies when it came to wine - in these restaurants). "Luxury" ingredients you can't get at dozens of other US restaurants? No. Fabulous furnishings? Don't think so. Great chef in the kitchen? No (I've read about the chefs - they seem good - but not worth this much money). Inventive creative cuisine (maybe - although I don't see any evidence of it in the reviews). Big name chain restaurant. Yup.

For what you spend at these places - you could have perhaps 3, 4 or 5 meals in an upcoming US restaurant where the chef is doing new, exciting things with local ingredients. A Quince - a York Street. Or - you could just about go to the Dordogne region of France and have some of that goose foie gras (assuming you were a good shopper when it came to air fares).

I don't go to Las Vegas that often - I don't gamble. However I think it's a fun place - and I might spend a few days there this fall. But spending $1000+ for a dinner there with a no-name chef in the kitchen - forget it. Robyn

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  • 1 month later...

It seems for your price range you might consider L'Artelier de JR and do it big time knowing you will be safely under your, albiet very generous, max.

I haven't been to either of them yet but a guy can dream right?

"A man's got to believe in something...I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields

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It seems for your price range you might consider L'Artelier de JR and do it big time knowing you will be safely under your, albiet very generous, max.

I haven't been to either of them yet but a guy can dream right?

***That's exactly what we decided to do (-:

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FG,

Seems like a great call! I'll be in Vegas in November and I am hoping to squeeze in a trip as well.

"A man's got to believe in something...I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields

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