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Kerry Beal

Confections! (2006-2012)

1,754 posts in this topic

I made nougat for this first time this weekend.  It is not photo-worthy, but it is tasty!  I used a Jacques Torres recipe and subbed hazelnuts for pistachios.  The recipe yield was huge -- I assume it will keep well for a while if I wrap it airtight?

It should keep reasonably well. The nuts going stale is the limiting factor.

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I made nougat for this first time this weekend.  It is not photo-worthy, but it is tasty!  I used a Jacques Torres recipe and subbed hazelnuts for pistachios.  The recipe yield was huge -- I assume it will keep well for a while if I wrap it airtight?

It should keep reasonably well. The nuts going stale is the limiting factor.

Thanks, that makes sense. Your chocolates are beautiful!

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I wanted to let everyone know that Kerry's first class in the eGCI "Confectionery 101" course is starting today -- it covers Caramel.


Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
Manager
jzimmerman@eGullet.org
eG Ethics signatory
Author, The Healthy Pressure Cooker Cookbook and All About Cooking for Two

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Ahhhhh Thank you so much for let us know ( or its just me I never look around the site too much , always in a hurry ), I wont miss it ,I just love Kerry production and knowledge .

Thank you :biggrin:


Vanessa

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Ok I need to start making chocolates again this weekend ( people is starting to get cravings again I guess :laugh: ),so I will make some usual production ( well usual for me )but today while I was driving back from work I tought I would like to experiment a little if I have the time .

I was thinking making mars bars , wich I made previously but I wanted to try peanuts maybe salted peanuts or honey roasted ones, and then I thought of a candy bar I really like ( whats the name....something 5 in one or so ) its sweet and salty with pretzels in it ,so maybe something like that with caramel pretzels peanuts and chocolate what else :laugh: ,well you got the idea.

I actually ahve a question about making caramel with corn syrup versus glucose or honey,now I know they are different and the honey gives the caramel a distint taste , but the corn syrup had the high fructose corn syrup in it ,is glucose better or has the same components as the cors syrup , on this matter I am alitle confuse ,I would like to produce caramels without the HFCS if possible, is this possible?

Thank you


Vanessa

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Ok I need to start making chocolates again this weekend ( people is starting to get cravings again I guess  :laugh: ),so I will make some usual production ( well usual for me )but today while I was driving back from work I tought I would like to experiment a little if I have the time .

I was thinking making mars bars , wich I made previously but I wanted to try peanuts maybe salted peanuts or honey roasted ones, and then I thought of a candy bar I really like ( whats the name....something 5 in one or so ) its sweet and  salty with pretzels in it ,so maybe something like that with caramel pretzels peanuts and chocolate what else  :laugh: ,well you got the idea.

I actually ahve a question about making caramel with corn syrup versus glucose or honey,now I know they are different and the honey gives the caramel a distint taste , but the corn syrup had the high fructose corn syrup in it ,is glucose better or has the same components as the cors syrup , on this matter I am alitle confuse ,I would like to produce caramels without the HFCS if possible, is this possible?

Thank you

Vanessa,

White corn syrup is just glucose with bit more water and some vanilla added, so you can use them interchangably. There is only a bit of honey in the recipe I use, it's there for flavour, do try leaving it out and see if you like the flavour of the finished product.

In the confectionary course one of the lessons is home made snickers bars, so the recipe will be adaptable to the one you want to make if it's anything like a mars bar.

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As mentioned in another thread, I've been making wedding chocolates, petit four style, for a friend. Here's how the kitchen looked at 2 am on the morning of the wedding

gallery_29514_1165_44770.jpg

and here's what I made

gallery_29514_1165_43218.jpg

from the left and clockwise they are Café Cognag, Lime, Hazelnut and Lavender/honey.

(Thanks to Kerry Beal, SummerSun and Trishad for suggestions on the lime filling - went with a bit of citric acid to give it more sharpness as I ended up being very busy at work and not having much time to test)

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Mette, beautiful chocolates! Did you get some of the shapes (flowers and sticks) from PCB Creations?

Great job...now you can rest, right? :blink:

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As mentioned in another thread, I've been making wedding chocolates, petit four style, for a friend. Here's how the kitchen looked at 2 am on the morning of the wedding

gallery_29514_1165_44770.jpg

and here's what I made

gallery_29514_1165_43218.jpg

from the left and clockwise they are Café Cognag, Lime, Hazelnut and Lavender/honey.

(Thanks to Kerry Beal, SummerSun and Trishad for suggestions on the lime filling - went with a bit of citric acid to give it more sharpness as I ended up being very busy at work and not having much time to test)

Oh Mette, you are marvelous! Your chocolates look wonderful and your friend is very lucky indeed to have such an artisan as you at his/her disposal. Bravo!


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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and here's what I made

gallery_29514_1165_43218.jpg

from the left and clockwise they are Café Cognag, Lime, Hazelnut and Lavender/honey.

Those look fabulous. I especially like the oval shape with the stripped transfer. Those containers you have them in look very practical for large quantities.

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Everything on this thread looks so stunning.

I am starting to teach a Confectionery class at a college near me and hope to finally take some good pix... I have only taught it once before and so the curriculum is sort of made-up along the way. Obviously eGullet is a great on-line resource, but if you signed up for a class like this (it runs for 12 weeks, 4 hours each) what would you like to learn? The class is 8 students. Thanks!

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Everything on this thread looks so stunning.

I am starting to teach a Confectionery class at a college near me and hope to finally take some good pix... I have only taught it once before and so the curriculum is sort of made-up along the way. Obviously eGullet is a great on-line resource, but if you signed up for a class like this (it runs for 12 weeks, 4 hours each) what would you like to learn? The class is 8 students. Thanks!

Let's see, 12 weeks, that would give you time to do

1. Caramel

2. Fondant

3. Fudge

4. High boiled sweets - lollipops

5. Marshmallow

6. Nougat

7. Pull Taffy

8. Jellies

9. Divinity, sea foam

10. Toffee

11. Truffles

12. Brittles

13. Caramel corn

14. Fruit leathers

15. Butter Crunch

16. Candied nuts

17. Marzipan

18. Chocolate work - I could fill 12 - 4 hour classes with that alone

19. Barks

20. Dipped fruits

21. Cherry cordials

Keep us up to date on what you decide to teach. Can't wait to see the pictures.

Given that it is 'as you go along', why not plan the first class, take along a list of possible subjects and let the students guide you in what they would like to learn each week.

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Thanks for your input! I've worked out a rough outline, but a wrench has been put in it since we won't have a kitchen space for the first one or two lessons. I've also determined that the students want to learn some basic showpieces in chocolate and sugar... blame the Food Network.

Caramel corn! Love it!

Week 1: Course requirements, equipment discussion, chocolate and sugar tasting and discussion -- history, tempering, sugar cooking

Week 2: truffles -- ganache and tempering

3: Molded chocolates

4: framed ganaches, caramels, candied orange peel

5: buttercrunch, dipping, transfer/texture sheets

6: fudge, choc. clay, larger molds (Santas, eggs)

7: Midterm; working with choc. clay

8: nougatine, marzipan, pastillage? Car. corn could fit in here.

9: Pate de Fruit, marshmallows, nougat (design of showpiece due)

10: Spun, cast, poured sugar -- lollipops, showpiece bases, pulling with Isomalt if they are interested

11-12: Work on showpiece

12: Final; presentation of showpiece

Of course a lot depends on how "into it" the students are. Personally I love to work with chocolate more than I do sugar, but I'll pretty much have to assess if these kids are the high-end chocolate type or are happy with Merckens compound.

Thanks again for your quick reply, would appreciate any feedback. Also, I am thinking of counting their showpiece design as a research paper, but any ideas for another one?

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Thanks again for your quick reply, would appreciate any feedback. Also, I am thinking of counting their showpiece design as a research paper, but any ideas for another one?

How about 'designing' a center or particular candy, be it ganache or other, developing the flavour profile, figuring out how to make the texture they are after for the type of sweet they are designing, developing the recipe, then making the final product to see how it plays.

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I'm in awe of the chocolates being produced. They're gorgeous and the flavour combos sound great. I'd love to try working on some, but don't think I have the patience.

(I'm about to use a line I hate when it's directed at me, but here goes) If you ever need any tasters... :wink:

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I'm in awe of the chocolates being produced.  They're gorgeous and the flavour combos sound great.  I'd love to try working on some, but don't think I have the patience. 

(I'm about to use a line I hate when it's directed at me, but here goes)  If you ever need any tasters... :wink:

Any time you are in town you are welcome to drop by and taste anything I've got sitting around or on the go.

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Hey peoples, I'm newish to the chocolating game but I'm keen to expand on my skills. This forum is a smashing place to do it..

I recently knocked up a batch of hazelnut and frangelico paste balls in dark and also tried my hand (as a result of a dare) at the chilli chocolate thing, I made a cream filling for molded chocolates out of coconut cream, grated root ginger, crystalised ginger, lime zest and juice, lemongrass, a fresh birdseye chilli and a kaffir lime leaf. The filling was great on it's own, nice flavours and plenty of bite but I don't think it sat well with the dark chocolate. Other people love them but I am unconvinced. Next stop Chilli, black pepper and cinnamon dark chocolate truffles..


"Alternatively, marry a good man or woman, have plenty of children, and train them to do it while you drink a glass of wine and grow a moustache." -Moby Pomerance

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Hey peoples, I'm newish to the chocolating game but I'm keen to expand on my skills. This forum is a smashing place to do it..

I recently knocked up a batch of hazelnut and frangelico paste balls in dark and also tried my hand (as a result of a dare) at the chilli chocolate thing, I made a cream filling for molded chocolates out of coconut cream, grated root ginger, crystalised ginger, lime zest and juice, lemongrass, a fresh birdseye chilli and a kaffir lime leaf. The filling was great on it's own, nice flavours and plenty of bite but I don't think it sat well with the dark chocolate. Other people love them but I am unconvinced. Next stop Chilli, black pepper and cinnamon dark chocolate truffles..

Hi Natho! Welcome to eGullet! Your combinations sound very interesting. Can you post any pictures of your creations?


Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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They're just a fairly simple mold for the chilli ones (although I think I got a good temper this time - nice and shiny) and the hazelnut ones are just a standard ball, not much to look at realy. I am still working on flavors and techniques then I will go on to decorating better. I'll post some if I get a good batch crackin. I live in australia so it his hard for me to get hold of good hardware like quality molds etc. All I can ever find in kitchenware stores are crappy thin plastic molds with uber-cheesy shapes like love hearts with bows tied on them and a billion holiday themed molds. Still searching..


"Alternatively, marry a good man or woman, have plenty of children, and train them to do it while you drink a glass of wine and grow a moustache." -Moby Pomerance

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They're just a fairly simple mold for the chilli ones (although I think I got a good temper this time - nice and shiny) and the hazelnut ones are just a standard ball, not much to look at realy. I am still working on flavors and techniques then I will go on to decorating better. I'll post some if I get a good batch crackin. I live in australia so it his hard for me to get hold of good hardware like quality molds etc. All I can ever find in kitchenware stores are crappy thin plastic molds with uber-cheesy shapes like love hearts with bows tied on them and a billion holiday themed molds. Still searching..

Ciao Natho and welcome on Egullet :biggrin: .

I really dont think its easy to find profesional polycarbonate molds in regular kitchenware stores, even here in the States ( also because all the polycarbonate molds are from Europe :raz: ), some of the store might have catalogue from wich you can order some molds with them ,but the best option is to order the molds online , thats how I get mine anyway , and I know most people here gets them online.Just need to find a supplier online for Australia.

This site is from UK , but you can always send them an email or call them to ask information about molds suppliers in Australia,or web site that ship there .

http://www.vantagehouse.com/index.php


Edited by Desiderio (log)

Vanessa

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They're just a fairly simple mold for the chilli ones (although I think I got a good temper this time - nice and shiny) and the hazelnut ones are just a standard ball, not much to look at realy. I am still working on flavors and techniques then I will go on to decorating better. I'll post some if I get a good batch crackin. I live in australia so it his hard for me to get hold of good hardware like quality molds etc. All I can ever find in kitchenware stores are crappy thin plastic molds with uber-cheesy shapes like love hearts with bows tied on them and a billion holiday themed molds. Still searching..

www.jvknl.com in Holland, they will either sell directly to you, or if there is a supplier in Australia they will refer you to them.

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They're just a fairly simple mold for the chilli ones (although I think I got a good temper this time - nice and shiny) and the hazelnut ones are just a standard ball, not much to look at realy. I am still working on flavors and techniques then I will go on to decorating better. I'll post some if I get a good batch crackin. I live in australia so it his hard for me to get hold of good hardware like quality molds etc. All I can ever find in kitchenware stores are crappy thin plastic molds with uber-cheesy shapes like love hearts with bows tied on them and a billion holiday themed molds. Still searching..

According to J.B. Prince Shipping Policy, they will ship to countries other than the U.S. and Canada. You might give them a try. Good selection and good customer service.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Thanks heaps for the info everyone, I'll be checking it out for sure. Unfortunately I'm a student so the budget is a bit tight. I do however have access to 3d CAD printers and plastic vaccuum forming equipment at university, so I am looking at making my own molds. I'll be trying that avenue out some time soon..


"Alternatively, marry a good man or woman, have plenty of children, and train them to do it while you drink a glass of wine and grow a moustache." -Moby Pomerance

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Thanks heaps for the info everyone, I'll be checking it out for sure. Unfortunately I'm a student so the budget is a bit tight. I do however have access to 3d CAD printers and plastic vaccuum forming equipment at university, so I am looking at making my own molds. I'll be trying that avenue out some time soon..

:blink:


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Thanks heaps for the info everyone, I'll be checking it out for sure. Unfortunately I'm a student so the budget is a bit tight. I do however have access to 3d CAD printers and plastic vaccuum forming equipment at university, so I am looking at making my own molds. I'll be trying that avenue out some time soon..

That will allow you to make some interesting stuff, however the polycarbonate molds are a lot easier to work with. The thermo formed molds are a bugger to rap on the countertop, so get yourself some sort of good vibrating device to get the bubbles out.

Rules for mold making, bottom of the chocolate has to be the same width or wider than the top, perfectly smooth things tend to suction in place and are hard to demold, so some relief pattern will aid demolding. I've forgottn now what the rules were for chocolate bars but basically they don't work well if they are just big chunks as I recall, patterns are best, and any patterns must be wider as you go towards the bottom of the chocolate. As in - picture molding in a jelly jar vs a mayo jar, you ain't never getting it out of a mayo jar.

Another option for good used polycarbonate molds is e-bay, there is a lovely fellow in Belgium who's ebay store is la boutique du chocolatier, who has some excellent used polycarbonate molds. They ship worldwide and very quickly. His english is not the best so be patient with that.

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