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Kerry Beal

Confections! (2006-2012)

1,754 posts in this topic

gallery_34671_3115_79624.jpg

A thread yesterday on making a smoother leche quemada caused my to try this candy for the first time. It is basically whole milk and sugar, cooked together until thick (about 4 1/2 hours all together), a bit of vanilla added. It is delicious, albeit very sweet. I think next time I might do some research on the correct finishing temperature in order to get candy that is a little softer.

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How true Kerry. I do have lots of things against me, even the weather is not on my side! Humidity is always high here but I guess I can always do it in an air conditioned room (I am supposing that is sufficient ??).

I think I will pay Borders a visit this weekend ( it will be 8 hours round trip for me ) I hope I can get the books that have been recommended earlier. By the way Kerry, any opinions on Bittersweet and Pure Chocolate as general chocolate book. What about their candy making section, since I am now introduced to this whole new area? Thanks in advance.

The airconditioning should be enough to overcome the humidity and allow you to made nougat (and work with chocolate).

Abebooks is a network of used book sellers that is world wide. www.abebooks.com They will have all 3 of the books that were mentioned. You won't find the time-life books at Borders as they are out of print. Try abebooks or e-bay. Not that I would want to discourage an 8 hour trip to Borders.

Both Bittersweet and Pure Chocolate are books that I looked at and didn't buy, because at the time they came around I was after books only about molding etc. If I found them at my cheap bookstore these days I would likely pick them up. Bittersweet particularly gets lots of positive mentions on eG.

What do you want your chocolate books to cover? If you are thinking chocolate as confectionary, eg molding, dipping, tempering, I would recommend the books by eG's own 'chocartist' Elaine Gonazalez. Chocolate Artistry is out of print but can be found on e-bay at times and abebooks at times. The Art of Chocolate is still in print and you will likely find it at Borders. The Chocolate Bible by Karl Teubner is also a good 'entry level' book.

Fine Chocolate by Wybauw is a professional level book that can be found for the best price at www.chocolat-chocolat.com.

If you are a visual learner, you might also find the videos on DVD that I have made to be helpful. Info on my website. I find I learn best by seeing then supplimenting with reading.

I have Chocolate Bible ! Was reading it this morning before leaving for work. I never ever thought one can actually attempt these things at home. I bought the book for the pictures a year ago. I am inspired, but like my fellow Malaysian said, good quality ingredients are hard to find where I live but I am not about to give up before having even started, I should at least crash first before giving up. :laugh:

Will get some reading materials (thanks for all the recommendations), go through your website and hope for good weather. :biggrin:

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LindaL, for Valrhona chocolates and other 'hard to get stuff', check out Gourmandines.

And, for cookbooks, you can always check the local availability of the books you want from Kinokuniya and MPH. Sometimes there are online sales of 15% or more. HTH.


TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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LindaL, for Valrhona chocolates and other 'hard to get stuff', check out Gourmandines.

And, for cookbooks, you can always check the local availability of the books you want from Kinokuniya and MPH. Sometimes there are online sales of 15% or more. HTH.

Hi Linda,

We have a good chocolate factory in Singapore and we have lots of shops that sell different types of chocolate for backing eg. Phoon Huat, Win Sin and Sin Lit.

Perhaps they have branches in Malaysia too

Devagi Sanmugam

www.devagi.com


Devagi Sanmugam

www.devagi.com

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Yunnermeier,

If you ever make a trip down to Singapore, you can get Valrhona cocoa at Sun Lik (Seah Street). It's about S$11.50 for 500g. And they sell Valrhona chocolate at around $30 per kilo... varying a few dollars depending on the cocoa %.

Hope that helps :smile:

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Kerry, I'd love to try the nougat recipe, thanks for posting it.  Question -- is there any substitute you can recommend for the edible rice paper?  Will heavy, coated parchment work, or will I be picking pieces of paper out of my candies?

I'd probably butter the parchment to make it easier to peel off. Let us know how it works.

In my experience, the parchment has to be coated with something or it will stick terribly. Butter or canola oil or even (God forbid) Pam will do the trick.


"If the divine creator has taken pains to give us delicious and exquisite things to eat, the least we can do is prepare them well and serve them with ceremony."

~ Fernand Point

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Yunnermeier,

If you ever make a trip down to Singapore, you can get Valrhona cocoa at Sun Lik (Seah Street). It's about S$11.50 for 500g. And they sell Valrhona chocolate at around $30 per kilo... varying a few dollars depending on the cocoa %.

Hope that helps  :smile:

Yes, I just remembered - it is Sun Lik and not Sin Lit as I have told Lindal earlier.

Thanks ReneeK


Devagi Sanmugam

www.devagi.com

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Kerry, thank you for the reply -- excellent information to know. I have quite a few of these books, I just find them attractive.

And thanks for the encouragement, I'll give it a try. There seems to be a whole resurgence of marshmallow appreciation going on, which I greatly approve of.

I'm a big fan of delicious homemade toffees, so maybe I'll start there.


I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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Renee K, thanks! I'd heard of Sun Lik, but forgot completely about it until you mentioned it.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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Hi all! Iam SOOOO pleased. I've just made nightscotsman's strawberry marshmallows, and they came out just beautifully. HUGE, fluffy, subtly flavored. Being one to gild the lily, I dipped half of them in chocolate. Will be trying new flavors--the curried ones sound great. And the ones wrapped in caramel.

I would like to try making the outrageous nougat in a couple of days. All my good ingredients and supplies are back in NewYork. I'll have to search around South Florida to find new ones...

I posted a picture of the marshmallows, but can't figure out how to send it. I'll try.

IS IT POSSIBLE TO BECOME ADDICTED TO eGULLET AFTER ONLY 4 DAYS????

:wub::wub::wub:

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IS IT POSSIBLE TO BECOME ADDICTED TO eGULLET AFTER ONLY 4 DAYS????

Umm.... yes.


"If the divine creator has taken pains to give us delicious and exquisite things to eat, the least we can do is prepare them well and serve them with ceremony."

~ Fernand Point

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Kerry - Have you made any other nougat versions (other than the Montelimar style with almonds and pistachios) using the same basic recipe that you've been happy with?

I have played around with a torrone version using almonds and hazelnuts and candied lemon and orange peel (came out good, but too sweet for my tastes, so I am considering zest instead of the candied peel for the next batch or maybe leaving the fruit out altogether). I was also planning to make a version with peanuts (like a more gourmet version of a Big Hunk) and have a few other types in mind (one with brazil nuts, one with macadamias). I'll be making them this week and early next and will post photos.

Excellent pictures and comments. Nice to know someone else is a nougat freak. :biggrin:


"If the divine creator has taken pains to give us delicious and exquisite things to eat, the least we can do is prepare them well and serve them with ceremony."

~ Fernand Point

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Kerry, I'd love to try the nougat recipe, thanks for posting it.  Question -- is there any substitute you can recommend for the edible rice paper?  Will heavy, coated parchment work, or will I be picking pieces of paper out of my candies?

I'd probably butter the parchment to make it easier to peel off. Let us know how it works.

Okey doke. My parchment is silicone-coated, and I'll give it a liberal greasing too boot. Will report back.

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Kerry - Have you made any other nougat versions (other than the Montelimar style with almonds and pistachios) using the same basic recipe that you've been happy with?

I have played around with a torrone version using almonds and hazelnuts and candied lemon and orange peel (came out good, but too sweet for my tastes, so I am considering zest instead of the candied peel for the next batch or maybe leaving the fruit out altogether).  I was also planning to make a version with peanuts (like a more gourmet version of a Big Hunk) and have a few other types in mind (one with brazil nuts, one with macadamias).  I'll be making them this week and early next and will post photos.

Excellent pictures and comments.  Nice to know someone else is a nougat freak.  :biggrin:

I have made it with candied peel, but I prefer the all nut version for day to day munching. One day I'll get around to the hazelnut version.

I'm not sure what a Big Hunk is, but I have played around with a home made snickers bar (we call it chuckles). Nougat with added peanut butter, caramel with roasted peanuts, dipped in a nice caramelly milk chocolate. Not a calorie in it.

I'm looking forward to your pictures of the various nougats - tasting notes too please!

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http://forums.egullet.org/uploads/11514120...3146_291978.jpg

                      Strawberry Marshmallows

                            :wacko:  Hope I Sent This Correctly! :wacko:

Those look marvelous!!

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Renee K, thanks! I'd heard of Sun Lik, but forgot completely about it until you mentioned it.

Yes, I just remembered - it is Sun Lik and not Sin Lit as I have told Lindal earlier.

Thanks ReneeK

May & Devagi, my pleasure :smile:

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I'm not sure what a Big Hunk is, but I have played around with a home made snickers bar (we call it chuckles).  Nougat with added peanut butter, caramel with roasted peanuts, dipped in a nice caramelly milk chocolate.  Not a calorie in it. 

Big Hunk is a West Coast regional candy bar. It's basically a strip of white nougat (firmer than the nougat I generally make) with peanuts in it. See here.

I have thought of adding peanut butter as well as peanuts to one version. Do you have a specific brand you find works well?


"If the divine creator has taken pains to give us delicious and exquisite things to eat, the least we can do is prepare them well and serve them with ceremony."

~ Fernand Point

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I'm not sure what a Big Hunk is, but I have played around with a home made snickers bar (we call it chuckles).  Nougat with added peanut butter, caramel with roasted peanuts, dipped in a nice caramelly milk chocolate.  Not a calorie in it. 

Big Hunk is a West Coast regional candy bar. It's basically a strip of white nougat (firmer than the nougat I generally make) with peanuts in it. See here.

I have thought of adding peanut butter as well as peanuts to one version. Do you have a specific brand you find works well?

I think I may have used Kraft smooth or Reese. I have both in the house. I might also have used homemade. Last made about a year ago, memory fades.

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Last night I made some mango pates de fruit. Valuable lesson learned, pour it out as soon as it is done. Don't let it cool down at all or it will start to set. A guitar cutter would make for much more even cuts.

gallery_34671_3115_35173.jpg

Because I had let it cool a few minutes before pouring it in the frame the top was quite lumpy, so a bit of trimming was required to sqare it up, consequently the pieces are not equal depths. A few more scraps than usual for fruit jellies. Still very tasty.

gallery_34671_3115_123768.jpg

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Kerry, I'd love to try the nougat recipe, thanks for posting it.  Question -- is there any substitute you can recommend for the edible rice paper?  Will heavy, coated parchment work, or will I be picking pieces of paper out of my candies?

I'd probably butter the parchment to make it easier to peel off. Let us know how it works.

In my experience, the parchment has to be coated with something or it will stick terribly. Butter or canola oil or even (God forbid) Pam will do the trick.

Try brushing the parchment with cocoa butter.

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I've lost track of the thread where we were discussing making silicone chocolate molds so I'll post my results here until I can find it again.

I ran down to Toronto and purchased some Smooth-On brand Smooth-sil 940 which is a food grade silicone for molding.

I took the little plaster groundhog (he used to be a beaver, but his owner lives in Wiarton and wants a Wiarton Willie chocolate mold, so he dremelled off his tail...voila...groundhog), attached him with a bit of sticktack to the bottom of a plastic container that had at least 1/2 an inch clearance all around. I mixed the silicone with the catalyst, then poured it in around him. I let it sit overnight and cut the container off in the morning. I then cut him out, placed the mold in the oven at 175 F for 4 hours and this evening I tried molding him for the first time. I painted the mold with milk chocolate, put the two sides together, poured in the milk chocolate, bound the whole thing up in guaze cling wrap (didn't have any rubber bands), banged it gently to get out the bubbles and put it in the fridge for 30 min or so. He unmolded very nicely.

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Original plaster groundhog (beaver)

gallery_34671_3115_4626.jpg

Silicone mold produced

gallery_34671_3115_91440.jpg

Chocolate version

I think this is a nice workable solution to those one off molding jobs where you have an object that you want to copy in chocolate. My sister in law has a whole bunch of Royal Doulton figurines, think she'd let me play with them?

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kerry, that's very cool. thanks for the demo on using that type of silicone!

nice "groundhog"!

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