Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

frisee aux lardons


Recommended Posts

Frisee aux lardons is my latest paramour. A local restaurant serves this salad with hot lardons (double smoked bacon), local roasted hazelnuts, apple and endive.

What makes this classic salad classic? Is it just the inclusion of the frisee and the lardons or does it indeed have an original recipe that inspires riffs on the classic?

What say you?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Abra has a beautiful photograph of a classic Salade Lyonnaise somewhere on eGullet that is a great source of inspiration.

I love croutons (see Lori's perfect ones above) that have been rubbed with cut slices of raw garlic.

And yes, lots of potent wine vinegar.

Around here, the problem is finding good frisee at this time of year. It's tender and perfect early in the spring, but tends to toughen in the heat.

Edited by Pontormo (log)

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

Link to post
Share on other sites
The vinaigrette offsets the fat? Anthony Bourdain uses a chicken liver vinaigrette in his version; Thomas Keller uses a bacon fat vinaigrette in his. I much prefer the latter.

just because there's fat IN the vinaigrette doesn't mean that the acid can't balance out some of the FEEL of the fattiness in the salad and dressing :biggrin: . i'm never against some bacon dripping vinaigrette!

Link to post
Share on other sites
The vinaigrette offsets the fat? Anthony Bourdain uses a chicken liver vinaigrette in his version; Thomas Keller uses a bacon fat vinaigrette in his. I much prefer the latter.

just because there's fat IN the vinaigrette doesn't mean that the acid can't balance out some of the FEEL of the fattiness in the salad and dressing :biggrin: . i'm never against some bacon dripping vinaigrette!

I think you are on the right track with the tart vinaigrette - it would brighten up - if that makes sense - the whole dish. I will go back and order another one to really concentrate on how the dressing addresses the ingredients.

I was looking at that recipe for chicken liver vinagrette yesterday - it sounds amazing, doesn't it?

The dish I get here is adamant about serving those lardons hot from the oven.

The vinaigrette the chef uses is an elusified dressing - a combination of white wine, dijon, shallots with canola or grapeseed oil with both cider and sherry winegar to get the right acidity.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I favor a port wine vinaigrette.

porquoi?

because I like the balance between the sweetness and acidity, and because I think the port provides a richness that offsets the richness of the bacon.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
Link to post
Share on other sites
When I make frisee aux lardons, I generally use applewood smoked bacon and homemade croutons, dressing with a sherry vinaigrette.  The poached egg is a "must" for me!

gallery_45186_3092_12633.jpg

It's my all-time favorite salad-

Lori

Moi aussi....Your photo has me salivating.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      It is possibly not well-known that China has some wonderful hams, up there with the best that Spain can offer. This lack of wide knowledge, at least in the USA, is mainly down to regulations forbidding their importation. However, for travellers to China and those in  places with less restrictive policies, here are some of the best.
       
      This article from the WSJ is a good introduction to one of the best - Xuanwei Ham 宣威火腿  (xuān wēi huǒ tuǐ) from Yunnan province.
      This Ingredient Makes Everything Better
      I can usually obtain Xuanwei ham here around the Chinese New Year/Spring Festival, but I also have a good friend who lives in Yunnan who sends me regular supplies. The article compares it very favourably with jamon iberico, a sentiment with which I heartily agree.



      Xuanwei Ham
       

      Xuanwei Ham
       
      more coming soon.
       
       
    • By Joe Wood
      Where I live pork loin is often on sale  for $2.00 or even less... Has anyone an opinion about using just pork loin for the meat along with the 20% pork fat? ?
      I've read that any meat can be used to make the cured salami... I'd like to hear from anyone before I try it...
    • By Joe Wood
      Hello to all... At this stage of my dry salami making I'm afraid I have more questions than I'm entitled to. However any help I receive will be most appreciated.
      1.   I followed directions on the 5 lb. batch as well as I was able... Three weeks into this I have achieved about 43% reduction in weight on all links. I use a wine fridge to cure.. My neighbor took one link home at the same time and just "hung it in his refrigerator" with no special settings for humidity or temperature... This one came out IDENTICAL to all the rest in appearance and weight reduction of 43%. How can this be?
      2.   I put the left over Mold 600 in a bowl in with the drying salami links. Is this good or not good ?
      3.   Now  that desired weight has been achieved is further aging beneficial?
      Thanks so much for offering a site like this... All the best to all of you...
      Joe Wood


    • By Grishna
      Coppa is a classic italian delicacy of matured cured meat. Not as widely known as prosciutto and, in my opinion, not  justifiably. The curing time takes weeks, as it should
      for a well matured and multilayered flavour. Good things come to those who wait, but while you do, why not treat yourself to a quick fix  of cooked coppa? Here is what I do:
      Salt the meat in 2% dry rub (nitrate salt and regular salt 50/50) in a vacuum bag for 5 days; Rub dry herbs and spices (whatever comes to mind). The meat will be sticky, so it's easy; Cook on rack above a tray in the oven on fan setting at 80 celcius to internal temperature 67 celsius.  This will take a couple of hours. When internal temperature reaches 60 -ish I add some boiling water in the tray to speed up the heat delivery; Cool in the fridge overnight; Enjoy. This is a seriously moreish ham.
       
       
         
    • By devinp
      I just finished curing my first lomo, and all looks/smells/tastes great except a couple sections inside the lomo that could be black mold?  I kept the exterior clean from mold (I had mostly white and some green pop up during curing, but wiped with vinegar to keep clean).  This picture shows one of those spots closer to the edge in the fat, but there was a second near the middle of the loin that I cutout already.  Unless I find more substantial sections, I think I'm good just cutting away those parts, but would love second opinions..  Thanks.
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...