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Marlene

Complete Transportable Meal

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A very good friend of mine passed away last week, and I have volunteered to be one of the people to provide a meal to the family next week, while they are coping. So here's what I need. Ideas for a complete meal including veg, main and dessert. The whole thing must be portable and easily warmed up, so things should hold well if possible. Some restrictions include:

1 child doesn't eat meat. No nuts. 1 child isn't fond of dairy. The family loves carbs so I guess pasta dishes of some sort might be an option. Cream sauces aren't wonderful.

Eggs are fine, no fish or mushrooms.

Vegetables they like include, corn, brocoli, snow peas and carrots. Everyone likes fruit.

The family is jewish, although they don't keep kosher, pork products are out.

My turn is this coming Monday so I need help!


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Vegetarian lasagna or enchilada casserole (I prefer the latter's reheating abilities).

On the side, a moist bread-like thing such as corn pudding or perhaps lightly sauteed succotash. A cold veggie side of marinated salad - a mayo-free slaw, if you will.

Great recipe for the latter item in Julia's "The Way to Cook" - just follow her classic coleslaw recipe and omit the mayo, using whatever sturdy veggies you'd like.

Good luck!

Andrea

http://tenacity.net


"You can't taste the beauty and energy of the Earth in a Twinkie." - Astrid Alauda

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Hmm... sounds like a job for quiche, or stir-fry...


I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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What about a simple roast chicken?

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Soup and biscuits/bread are always comforting, and cobbler or crisp for dessert, it can be a pretty good breakfast food too. I always do dishes that I can cook for my family and double up for extra, like chili, stew, soup, etc. I tend to do pies and quiches as well because you can make a bunch of pastry and just fill them with desserts or quiche or stew. Also brownies, cake, or cookies are good items for guests because if they are jewish they will have a house full of people and it is nice to have extra sweets in the freezer to take out if needed. It is the thought that counts and if you are greiving as well don't feel bad about bringing some nice bagels and lox, or good french bread, along with store bought dinners if you are not up for cooking. Nobody is particularly picky at times like this but it can be very comforting for you to do some cooking if that helps you and the love that you put into to it always makes a difference, but don't stress yourself.

I am sorry for your loss. Take care.

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Sorry for the loss of your friend, Marlene.

Spinach and Cheese Calzones with a tomato sauce on the side. A green salad or a nice cold broccoli "salad" dressed with olive oil, crushed red pepper and lemon juice. A simple blueberry cake.

Hmmm... you also mentioned not too much dairy. My next thought was aritchoke and mushroom but maybe there are some other options. They are easy to transport and reheat.

Another idea would be a nice soup maybe made with corn or with broccoli or carrots.. Taboulleh stuffed pitas that they can fill themselves. (This can be enriched with feta cheese for the people that are ok with dairy. Shrimp is also nice in taboulleh but this option may not be viable for them.) Pineapple and strawberry salad for dessert.


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Vegetarian chili and cornbread are two other things that just crossed my mind... not very summery, but good food that withstand storage and reheating gracefully.


I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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I'd agree with the Bread and Chili, though with kids, you'll need to make it less heat, more sweet. also, it's a one-bowl kinda food, so they have to do less dishes if there are a lot of people around.

Desserts that are transportable.. brownies? maybe mini butter tarts or berry tarts. But I feel brownies and cookies work best. Lemon squares are rather nice. if you'd like to plate them, you can always make some a nice mascarpone cream and serve with any of those. Tastes especially nice with dark chocolate brownies.


foodpr0n.com 11/01/17: A map of macarons in Toronto // For free or for a fee - bring your bottle! corkagetoronto.com

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I like the roast chicken idea, if you have a suitable container to transport it. It can be reheated, or eaten cold or room temp, and if the chicken's big enough, they'll have leftovers for a sandwich. Potato salad, vinegar-based dressing, perhaps with dill? also good warm or cold. A good quantity of any sort of robust vegetable salad including beans for the non-meat child. Well, I'm crazy about "salad suppers" as we call them in my family.

For dessert, how about a pecan or sugar pie? holds up well if it's not eaten all at once.


Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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I'm 3rding the chicken idea. In our town the thing to do is provide meals for families that give birth. I've done easily a dozen "feedings" this year and every time, they thank me for not bringing "another casserole." And they can pick at the chicken for a while, and potato wedges are yummy any time!

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condolences to the family and to you for the loss of a family memeber and friend

don't know what the weather is like up there but it is quite warm here so what about items that don't need to be heated?

with the no meat idea what about some sort of a pasta with vegetable - bow ties with peas and squash and a vinagrette, a long pasta with pesto and tomatoes, - don't know if the "not crazy about dairy" would like a hard cheese added but you can always grate some fresh and put it in a small container for adding later.

the protein can always be separate - roast chicken as mentioned is great, a roasted filet or some meatballs with gravy.

a green salad? 4 bean salad(yellow and green beans, kidney beans, ceci, onion, shallot, fresh parsley and dressing made from oil, vinegar, pepper, sugar, a bit of water)? bread with a spread of some sort? stuffed/deviled eggs?

can't help you on the dessert - don't eat it.............uhhhh chocolate mousse pie - will try to get it up on recipegullet and it is dead easy


Edited by suzilightning (log)

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Here's what I'm thinking so far. Everyone can steer me back if I'm too far off base.

Fried chicken

Veg lazagna or enchilladas

Broccoli salad

Cinammon bread from my bread maker

Brownies and choc chip muffins.

My date got changed till next Monday, the 26th so I have a little more time.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Sorry about your friend, Marlene. How sad.

BBQ chicken might hold up better than fried, though I do love cold fried chicken.


Bridget Avila

My Blog

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Hmmm. I don't know why I keep thinking the skin will not be as nice. Or, I could do a roast chicken platter for them to make sandwiches with maybe. With a variety of salads. I do know the family loves pasta. How does penne alla vodka re heat?


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Soup and biscuits/bread are always comforting, and cobbler or crisp for dessert, it can be a pretty good breakfast food too. I always do dishes that I can cook for my family and double up for extra, like chili, stew, soup, etc. I tend to do pies and quiches as well because you can make a bunch of pastry and just fill them with desserts or quiche or stew. Also brownies, cake, or cookies are good items for guests because if they are jewish they will have a house full of people and it is nice to have extra sweets in the freezer to take out if needed. It is the thought that counts and if you are greiving as well don't feel bad about bringing some nice bagels and lox, or good french bread, along with store bought dinners if you are not up for cooking. Nobody is particularly picky at times like this but it can be very comforting for you to do some cooking if that helps you and the love that you put into to it always makes a difference, but don't stress yourself.

I am sorry for your loss. Take care.

Oh! I love the idea of a crisp for dessert!


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Hmmm.  I don't know why I keep thinking the skin will not be as nice.  Or, I could do a roast chicken platter for them to make sandwiches with maybe.  With a variety of salads.  I do know the family loves pasta.  How does penne alla vodka re heat?

Not well. Trust Diana and I. Pasta is tough to do unless you do a casserole-type thing. Do you have any ideas of what other people are providing? Last time we did this for a church member, we all gave the coordinator roughly what we'd do.

I like the fried chicken idea (if you make sure it's totally cool and don't put it in an airtight container, it does fairly well, but I also like the roast chicken platter idea, along with a loaf of good bread, and some salads. Another thought is a quiche. And, don't forget to take things over in containers that don't need to be returned!

Edited to add: rare beef tenderloin, sliced, with bread and salads would be very popular in my house!


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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the roast chicken really is a good choice--you can do a turkey breast, alsot.

you can make a giant chicken salad.

Cut up fruit salad

a pot roast

sesame noodles

grilled veggie platter

bean burritos

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How about:

Chicken pot pie

Stuffed baked potatoes

Stuffed peppers/cabbage rolls

Falafel balls?

Rice/choc/whathave you pudding?

My condolences.

~Radio7


the tall drink of water...

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Hmmm.  I don't know why I keep thinking the skin will not be as nice.  Or, I could do a roast chicken platter for them to make sandwiches with maybe.  With a variety of salads.  I do know the family loves pasta.  How does penne alla vodka re heat?

Not well. Trust Diana and I. Pasta is tough to do unless you do a casserole-type thing. Do you have any ideas of what other people are providing? Last time we did this for a church member, we all gave the coordinator roughly what we'd do.

I like the fried chicken idea (if you make sure it's totally cool and don't put it in an airtight container, it does fairly well, but I also like the roast chicken platter idea, along with a loaf of good bread, and some salads. Another thought is a quiche. And, don't forget to take things over in containers that don't need to be returned!

Edited to add: rare beef tenderloin, sliced, with bread and salads would be very popular in my house!

I'm not sure yet what other people are doing, but I should have an idea tomorrow.

I'm leaning more now to the BBQ/Roast chicken idea. Something vegetarian of course. The enchilada idea sounds intriguing but I need guidance.

Cold pasta salad of some sort?

Roast potato wedges? I think they could be nicely reheated. Some of this stuff I'll try to get as close to ala minute as I can, since they don't live that far from me. Maybe a fruit platter as well. I'm trying to stay away from casseroles etc as I suspect they've had their fill of them.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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What about fajita/taco fixings? You could bring them over hot, and they're good leftover for salad or reheated.

As for the container thing, I remember reading (Michael Lee West) an argument for containers that do need to be returned. When the family is ready, it forces them to start interacting with friends again instead of shutting themselves away.


Bridget Avila

My Blog

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Here's what I've got so far. Feel free to suggest changes/additions

For the vegetarian who likes cheese - homemade mac and cheese. This will be made at the last minute and taken over hot

For the others - Rotisserie chicken, roast potato wedges or potato salad maybe

Brocoli or pasta salad

Muffins/cinnamon breads for breakfast the next day

apple crisp.

fruit platter


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Marlene, that looks like a spectacular menu. Certainly more than I would expect were I in the shoes of the receiver. They are highly blessed with your friendship.


I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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Marlene, sorry about your loss.

Your menu sounds great. We do a lot of shiva meals - and the most appreciated things are generally desserts and snacky things (fruit, muffins, etc. are great because they can be eaten in between guest calls and after napping, etc.).

It sounds as though you've consulted with others - and that's important. And you've gone to the trouble to take into consideration all the likes/dislikes. You have very lucky friends, who I know will appreciate anything you bring them.

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Marlene,

I am sorry for your loss. I know from experience that anything you bring will be welcome. (We had three deaths in my family in the space of 4 years.)

For a cold pasta salad, you might try cooked cold spirals with chopped broccoli, grated carrot and some finely diced red onion. Dress it with italian dressing. No dairy, it keeps really well and even little kids will eat it. I find the tri-color spirals (sorry I never remember the real name) make it look more appealing.

Your menu sounds great.

Ellen

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Marlene, that menu sounds wonderful. I am sure it will be appreciated by the family. I'm sorry for your loss.

Last month we lost my 25 year old brother in law in a car accident, and then both my parents were also in the hospital the following week. Most people did not bring food, which is something that would have been very welcome. Due to a lack of time we wound up eating almost nothing but fast food for several weeks, and when you are already feeling bad that doesn't help at all. So when one of our family friends gave us meatloaf and potato salad we were really grateful.

That is all by way of saying that I think what you are doing is really great.


Jennie

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