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Jmahl

Making Tortillas at Home

174 posts in this topic

Lard! I rendered it myself, essentially using the pressure-rendering technique (including the 0.4% baking soda) in Modernist Cuisine. In a canning jar with some water, 4 hours at high pressure in my Kuhn-Rikon.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Matthew, that looks terrific... both the tortillas and the filling - great photos too.

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Lard! I rendered it myself, essentially using the pressure-rendering technique (including the 0.4% baking soda) in Modernist Cuisine. In a canning jar with some water, 4 hours at high pressure in my Kuhn-Rikon.

Lard is the only way to go! Looks good (I don't use bp)

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Lard? I've never seen a recipe for tortilla dough that called for any sort of fat--just masa and water. The baking powder idea is interesting.



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Lard? I've never seen a recipe for tortilla dough that called for any sort of fat--just masa and water. The baking powder idea is interesting.

They're wheat flour tortillas, though, not masa ones. :wink:


Edited by mkayahara (log)

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Rancho Gordo: Your new press is wonderful! Really a work of art.

Thanks, all, for so many tips on making corn tortillas.

I'm curious: what else can a tortilla press be used for? Does it work for flour tortillas as well as corn tortillas? Pie dough?

Thanks. lkm

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I use my press when forming Chinese pot stickers. Put you knob of dough in the press and gently press so you have the start of a dumpling then finish with your rolling pin....gets them nice and round.

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A few months back rancho_gordo allowed us to meet his Rolls Royce of tortilla presses. I would like to introduce the M1 Abrams tank of tortilla presses. It is constructed of 100% stainless steel and weighs in at 19 pounds.

IMG_0957.jpg


Edited by danielito (log)

Primate Asilvestrado

Solano County, California

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A few months back rancho_gordo allowed us to meet his Rolls Royce of tortilla presses. I would like to introduce the M1 Abrams tank of tortilla presses. It is constructed of 100% stainless steel and weighs in at 19 pounds.

OK, I have to admit that is the "Big Kahuna MacDaddy Bad MamaJama" of tortilla presses.

But the question that begs to be asked (and answered) is.....why?

My cast aluminum press that weighs about 2 pounds does a fine job, *AND* I can lift it and store it easily. At least Rancho Gordo's has aesthetic appeal.


--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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Why?

It's nearly indestructible.

It won't rust, corrode, splinter or crack.

It functions perfectly.

And I think it is beautiful in its own way.

I own one of rancho_gordo's Rolls Royce tortilla presses. It is a thing of beauty but I doubt I'll actually use it. When I want functionality, I'll use the tank


Primate Asilvestrado

Solano County, California

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That's super.

I now prefer wood but there was a time I preferred metal. I can see wanting both. I don't think you can have too many fountain pens or tortilla presses.


Visit beautiful Rancho Gordo!

Twitter @RanchoGordo

"How do you say 'Yum-o' in Swedish? Or is it Swiss? What do they speak in Switzerland?"- Rachel Ray

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I made Mexican tortillas today. The recipe had too much baking powder and salt, however the texture was excellent. Tomorrow I will reduce the baking powder and salt, resulting in this recipe - 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, 1/8 tsp. baking powder, scant 1/2 tsp. salt, 2 tbsp. butter-flavored Crisco, 1 tbsp. regular Crisco and about 3/4 cup boiling water. This makes six small tortillas, enough for testing a recipe.

I'd also like to try my hand at arepas soon. It is a Latin bread made with pre-cooked, white cornmeal.

Any tips for the above?

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I've been trying to perfect, with a little luck, home made corn tortillas. I mean, they're light years better than store-bought slabs of cardboard, to be sure.

 

I'm using corn masa (dried corn flour), because that's what I have access to. (I know they'd be better using the fresh stuff, but it ain't happening).

 

Anyway, I think my biggest problem, at this point, is the griddle temperature.  Can anyone tell me what the griddle/comal/cooking surface temperature should be - in degrees, please? 


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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My IR thermometer says mine is 550°F or thereabouts. It probably drifts a bit hotter than that towards the end of cooking.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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My IR thermometer says mine is 550°F or thereabouts. It probably drifts a bit hotter than that towards the end of cooking.

Yeah - I was doing them around 425℉ - 450℉. Too cool, I'm sure.

 

How long do yours take to cook, Chris?


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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I took a video: it looks like about 1:20, give or take a few seconds. Obviously I can make no claim that this is the only possible time/temperature combination, or that I am any particular expert (though I do make a lot of tortillas). It probably also depends on the thickness of your tortillas. I make mine pretty thick.

 

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Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Thanks for the video Chris.  Talk about real time. 


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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Yeah, it's non-stick. I choose it because of its low sides, not its non-stick properties, though. I have burnt myself on higher-sided pans shen dropping the tortilla in.

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Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I went with 270g of Masa to 400g of hot tap water (~130-140F). Mixed and let it sit for 30 minutes before forming balls, then cooked in a cast iron pan on medium-high. I lightly coated the pan with veggie oil before cooking and then did it maybe 3-4 more times during the batch. The pan was hot enough that the oil smoked off when applied and water would dance across the pan rather than instantly evaporate.  I got a little puff (~3/8") across all the tortilla's with maybe 1/4 getting puffed as much as the video that @Chris Hennes posted. Made em for a taco party and they were a definite hit.

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