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Steamed Lobster timing


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For 1+1/4 lb,  15 to 20 minutes.  A white fat will begin to appear around joints - a good time to remove to a collander.

Seems a bit long to steam a 1 1/4 lb lobster. I think 12-14 mins so I hope someone else with lots of experience will chime in here.

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Okay, speaking as someone with "lots of experience" I should add the following:

- If you are steaming one lobster, you should be ready at 15 mins.

- If you are steaming two to four lobsters the job's done closer to thirty. Rotate the bottom layer to the top halfway through cooking.

- Deposit the beasts when your 1 to 2 inches of water are at a rolling boil.

- If you are close to the ocean, rip a handful of seaweed off the rocks and add to the steaming liquid - use no more than an inch of water if you do.

- If you are using consumer grade steaming pot, try to clip the lid on as tightly as you can.

- Don't worry about liquid boiling out of the lid, keep the heat up and clean it up later.

bonus info can be found at the end of page one of my foodblog linked below.

"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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Okay, speaking as someone with "lots of experience" I should add the following:

-

-  If you are close to the ocean, rip a handful of seaweed off the rocks and add to the steaming liquid - use no more than an inch of water if you do.

bonus info can be found at the end of page one of my foodblog linked below.

Why the seawood?

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Holy crap!

A Five pounder? You are looking at a longer time - at least thirty minutes if you have the right receptacle - more if you are stuffing it into something small. I'd look at your heat source and determine how hot it's going to be in there - definitely two inch water.

Seaweed not only adds an ocean flavor but provides a bed for the lobster to set on while steaming. I discovered this a few years ago and never looked back. Makes an interesting stock too.

Let us know how it turns out.

"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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It's a 5 pound lobster. What should I do? 25-30 minutes maybe?

I make a LOT of lobsters (check out my website in my signature) and I use the Julia Child/Jasper White traditional steaming times of 13 or 14 minutes for the first pound, and 3 minutes per additional pound. Max. This works for lobsters as big as 8 pounds.

Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

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It's a 5 pound lobster. What should I do? 25-30 minutes maybe?

I make a LOT of lobsters (check out my website in my signature) and I use the Julia Child/Jasper White traditional steaming times of 13 or 14 minutes for the first pound, and 3 minutes per additional pound. Max. This works for lobsters as big as 8 pounds.

I steamed it for 26 minutes, so 14min/1st pound. 3 minutes per extra pound. I had three 5 pounders and 2 inches of salted water. I meant to use an upside down colander at the bottom of the pot, but there weren't many holes in it, so I didn't think the steam could get through. So instead, I just put the lobsters directly in.

I had a huge 2 foot stock pot, so I didn't know if it would get hot enough. It was fine. Perfect timing. Not overcooked, not undercooked.

And for some lobster humour, check out this video:

Edited by savvysearch (log)
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Holy crap!

A Five pounder? You are looking at a longer time - at least thirty minutes if you have the right receptacle - more if you are stuffing it into something small. I'd look at your heat source and determine how hot it's going to be in there - definitely two inch water.

Seaweed not only adds an ocean flavor but provides a bed for the lobster to set on while steaming.  I discovered this a few years ago and never looked back.  Makes an interesting stock too.

Let us know how it turns out.

Not close enough to the ocean for seaweed, but I wonder, have you ever tried it with ocean water?

Edited by savvysearch (log)
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For 1+1/4 lb,  15 to 20 minutes.  A white fat will begin to appear around joints - a good time to remove to a collander.

15-20 minutes? at the restaurnat we steam 1.5 lb lobsters for 8 minutes i do this everyday without fail. don't see how you can cook it for 15-20 minutes and not be over cooked

bork bork bork

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For 1+1/4 lb,  15 to 20 minutes.  A white fat will begin to appear around joints - a good time to remove to a collander.

15-20 minutes? at the restaurnat we steam 1.5 lb lobsters for 8 minutes i do this everyday without fail. don't see how you can cook it for 15-20 minutes and not be over cooked

you're using a pressure steamer....

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Not close enough to the ocean for seaweed, but I wonder, have you ever tried it with ocean water?

Yes!

On a sailing vessel - we purchased a dozen lobsters from a passing lobsterman and didn't want to use the fresh water (just in case). Threw a bayleaf in there too.

Spectacular results but longer cooking time, because, as mentioned above, most homes and boats don't have restaurant-grade cooking equipment. Seawater is also denser and takes longer to bring to boil.

Edited by johnnyd (log)

"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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