Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Saucier recommendation


gruntermen
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am looking for a new saucier/chef’s pan to replace my current 4 qt calphalon. The calphalon is hard anodized aluminum inside and out and I am absolutely fed up with cleaning it. Here is what I’m looking for:

-- Fully clad

-- Appx 4 qt capacity

-- Stainless steel interior

-- An exterior that isn’t hard anodized aluminum.

I will use this pan at least 3 times a week (hopefully for many years) so I am willing to pay extra for something high quality (although it may mean delaying the purchase for a few months). I don’t mind heavy cookware or hand washing. Based on what I’ve seen on egullet and slkinseys egullet class on cookware I get the feeling I’m down to one of two options

Wait for a sale on

-- Calphalon Tri-ply stainless/copper

-- All-clad stainless/mc2/copper core

Bite the bullet and prepare to spend upwards of $250 on really expensive but really good cookware ie

-- Bourgeat, Falk Culinair, Mauviel.

Is there something else I should be considering? The Demeyere didn’t seem like a good idea and the sitram isn’t fully clad.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

Reach out your hand if your cup be empty. If your cup is full may it be again.

-- Robert Hunter & Jerry Garcia

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I reckon you should go for the Bourgeat/Falk/Mauviel option. Yes, it is a lot of money for a pan, but it will pay you back for the rest of your life, and given that you will be using it several times a week, you won't be short of opportunities to enjoy it.

Seriously, if you use a particular pan that much, and assuming that you are not, say, simply boiling pasta in it every time (which I rather presume not), seems to me that, having bought the wrong kind of pan once and wanting to replace it, you should go for one that you can be absolutely sure you'll be happy with, and one that you will really enjoy using.

You really don't want to be coming back here in a year's time saying the same things ...

And since you currently have a saucier which you can use, then seems to me you should wait the extra months, pay the extra money, and then get cooking!

(And, yes, I have a Falk saucier and would not swap it for anything. And, yes, it cost what to me is an awful lot of money. And, yes, I love it and use it constantly and know that I will continue to do so for as long as I continue to cook. And, funnily enough, I bought it to replace ill-chosen anodised aluminium.)

One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.

Virginia Woolf

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's good to get a little perspective when it comes to the price situation.

Yes, spending 300 bucks on an eleven-inch/4.5-quart stainless lined heavy copper saucière isn't cheap. On the other hand, this is an incredibly versatile pan -- perfect for reductions, sautéing, finishing pasta with the sauce, etc. If you're like me, this will quickly become the most-used pan in your battery.

Also, this is 300 bucks for a pan that will last the rest of your life. Think about how much you spend on a computer or a DVD player or a television. More than 300 bucks, for sure. And these are things that maybe last 5 years. How can it be that a laptop with a 3 year lifespan is worth two thousand dollars, and a pan with a 50+ year lifespan is not worth three hundred?

--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now that's perspective! It makes a certain amount of my debating about what to get almost a waste of time. I have a Sitram (copper disk bottom) that I like, but if I were doing it again, I would get Falk.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone for your advice. I have to admit, the price of the pan is pretty insignificant in light of how long It would last. The expensive option it shall be! (Hopefully by the end of summer anyway...)

Some of the problems I've been having with this pan may be my own fault and I'd like to make sure that I don't wind up in the same boat with the new pan. Although the outside of this pan is an absolutely horrible atrocious god-awful mess, I've managed to keep the interior somewhat clean with a lot of comet and scotchbrite pads:

gallery_38254_2778_79598.jpg

The problem is keeping the pan clean around the rivets and all the little silver indentations and pocks that have occurred:

gallery_38254_2778_104214.jpg

The silver dents are right in the area where I would usually stick a spoon to scraps down the sides. The only utensils I have been using in the pan are either plastic or the stainless steel utensils that came bundled with the pan. Am I overheating the pan? I don't have these problems with my stainless steel pans.

Reach out your hand if your cup be empty. If your cup is full may it be again.

-- Robert Hunter & Jerry Garcia

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think you are overheating your pan.

I had a set of Calphalon anodized aluminum that I bought about 20 years ago. Fact is, the coating wears off and reveals the aluminum beneath. This can happen from normal wear like using a spoon in the pot. It can also wear off from acidic foods, as my husband used a soup pot for several years to make chili in at least weekly, and the coating wore off there, too.

You'll never get those "silver dents" out, it will only get worse with use.

*****

"Did you see what Julia Child did to that chicken?" ... Howard Borden on "Bob Newhart"

*****

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Several people have had good comments on one or more of Sitram's lines of saucier's. I think it's the Profiserie line that is the higher quality one, and that can be found for significantly less than $300.

Although, I do tend to agree with Sam. If it's got that kind of life span, a moderately high price tag really doesn't enter into the equation.

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think you are overheating your pan.

I had a set of Calphalon anodized aluminum that I bought about 20 years ago.  Fact is, the coating wears off and reveals the aluminum beneath.  This can happen from normal wear like using a spoon in the pot.  It can also wear off from acidic foods, as my husband used a soup pot for several years to make chili in at least weekly, and the coating wore off there, too.

You'll never get those "silver dents" out, it will only get worse with use.

Oddly enough, I also use this pan about once a week for making chili :) A lot of curry also.

Reach out your hand if your cup be empty. If your cup is full may it be again.

-- Robert Hunter & Jerry Garcia

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's an All-Clad stainless pan on Ebay that meets your criteria. It's their 4 qt. stainless chef's pan with lid! It's at $87 with about an 1 1/4 hours to go!

http://cgi.ebay.com/All-Clad-CHEFS-PAN-Sta...1QQcmdZViewItem

I am looking for a new saucier/chef’s pan to replace my current 4 qt calphalon.  The calphalon is hard anodized aluminum inside and out and I am absolutely fed up with cleaning it.    Here is what I’m looking for:

-- Fully clad

-- Appx 4 qt capacity

-- Stainless steel interior

-- An exterior that isn’t hard anodized aluminum.

I will use this pan at least 3 times a week (hopefully for many years) so I am willing to pay extra for something high quality (although it may mean delaying the purchase for a few months). I don’t mind heavy cookware or hand washing.  Based on what I’ve seen on egullet and slkinseys egullet class on cookware I get the feeling I’m down to one of two options     

Wait for a sale on

-- Calphalon Tri-ply stainless/copper

-- All-clad stainless/mc2/copper core

Bite the bullet and prepare to spend upwards of $250 on really expensive but really good cookware ie

-- Bourgeat, Falk Culinair, Mauviel.

Is there something else I should be considering?  The Demeyere didn’t seem like a good idea and the sitram isn’t fully clad.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 11 years later...

Pros:

Go in the dishwasher (but don't expect them to get clean).

Heavy enough to stay steady on heating element.

Handles remain reasonably cool.

Heat sauces more evenly than bottom conductive disc pans.

Work with induction...though I don't have induction.

 

Cons:

Difficult to clean, even with much Barkeeper's Friend and elbow grease.*

Splashes all over the stove if you are stirring and not careful.**

I don't find my Demeyre particularly attractive but I may be the only one who cares what my pots look like.

 

Not sure if Pro or Con:

Welded handles with completely smooth interior.

 

 

* I think it must have to do with the steel or the finish.  Compare with Fissler stainless steel pans that clean right up.

 

** Really, did someone ever test this??

 

 

 

Disclaimer:  my preference for sauciers is Falk if you are actually using them for making sauces.

 

 

 

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMHO:

 

Pros:

Probably the best-performing clad sauciers made.

Rivetless, welded handles

Triplinduc base performs well on induction and stays flat

Silvinox lining treatment is actually easy to clean (see below)

 

Cons:

Relatively pricey

Silvinox is a queen bitch to clean of polymerized oils

Hard to find a B&M retailer to fondle the wares

Still not quite up to copper

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't say

 

but :

 

https://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-188347/Demeyere+Industry5+Saucier

 

2 qt  $ 199

 

https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/demeyere-5-plus-saucier/

 

3.5 qt $ 99

 

I have some aluminum all-clad sauciers.

 

work on gas and I like them

 

these pans do not seem to nave enough curvature to be called sauciers and work w a ballon whisk.

 

Id look else ware

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...