Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

eje

Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2006–2007)

Recommended Posts

gallery_27569_3038_17496.jpg

Blackthorn Cocktail (No 2)

Dash Orange Bitters (The Bitter Truth)

2/3 Sloe Gin (2 oz Homemade Plymouth Gin based Black Plum liqueur, jackal10 procedure.)

1/3 Italian Vermouth (1 oz Carpano Antica)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass

Cocktail from the "New and Additional Cocktails" section of the second edition of the Savoy Cocktail book.

First time I've tried this liqueur since I put it down last summer. I wasn't really sure what to expect, as I don't think I've ever actually had sloe or damson gin. Boy is it tasty, though! Incredibly complex in combination with the Vermouth. Plum gin is going to have to go on the regular summer liqueur schedule!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blue Blazer (for 3 - eje)

Use two large silver-plated mugs, with handles. (Two 30 oz mixing tins with thick towels - eje)

1 Wineglass Scotch Whisky (6 oz George T. Stagg, Antique Collection 2006)

1 Wineglass Boiling Water (6 oz)

Put the Whisky into one mug, and the boiling water into the other,

gallery_27569_3038_2956.jpg

ignite the Whisky with fire,

gallery_27569_3038_5444.jpg

and while blazing mix both ingredients by pouring them four or five times from one mug to the other.

gallery_27569_3038_8418.jpg

gallery_27569_3038_8628.jpg

gallery_27569_3038_15585.jpg

gallery_27569_3038_14499.jpg

gallery_27569_3038_6445.jpg

If done well this will have the appearance of a continued stream of liquid fire.

Sweeten with one teaspoonful of powdered white sugar (3 tsp caster sugar), and serve in a small bar tumbler, with a piece of lemon peel (orange peel).

gallery_27569_3038_7957.jpg

The Blue Blazer does not have a very euphonious or classic name, but it tastes better to the palate than it does to the ear.  A beholder gazing for the first time upon an experienced artist compounding this beverage, would naturally assume it was a nectar for Pluto rather than Bacchus.  The novice in mixing this beverage should be careful not to scald himself.  To become proficient in throwing the liquid from one mug to the other, it will be necessary to practice for some time with cold water.

Unfortunately, very difficult to catch how truly cool preparing the Blue Blazer looks on camera. The room fills with the wonderful smell of the hot whisky.

I don't have any barrel proof Scotch, so I decided to used the George T. Stagg instead. I did think I would be able to light the Stagg, (given it is 140.6 proof,) without heating it; but, found I did need to raise its temperature a bit before it would ignite.

The guests suggested I could make good money preparing Blue Blazers at parties.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But was it as good as advertised?

It's hard to beat a flaming whisk(e)y toddy!

Comments from the evening's guests were, "Oooo, that's really good!" and, "It warms you all the way down to your toes!"

So, yeah, I'd say Mr. Thomas' creation was quite the hit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blue Blazer history.

According to Lucius Beebe in "The Stork Club Bar Book", the Blue Blazer was invented by Professor Jerry Thomas in 1849 while he was working at the El Dorado bar here in San Francisco.

The story goes, a patron came into the bar and demanded of Professor Thomas that he, "Fix me some hell-fire that will shake me right down to my gizzard."

"Professor Thomas smiled and quietly poured a tumbler of Scotch Whisky into one of the mugs, followed by a slightly smaller quantity of boiling water. Then with an evil smelling sulphur match, he ignited the liquid, and as the blue flame shot toward the ceiling and the crowd fell back in awe, he hurled the blazing mixture back and forth between the two mugs, with a rapidity and dexterity that was well nigh unbelievable. This amazing spectacle continued in full movement for perhaps ten seconds, and then the professor poured the beverage into a tumbler and smothered the flame. He stirred in a spoonful of pulverized white sugar into the mixture, added a twist of lemon peel, and shoved the smoking concoction across to the booted and spurred giant.

"'Sir,' said Professor Thomas, bowing, 'The Blue Blazer!'

"The boastful miner threw back his head and flung the boiling drink down his throat. He stood motionless for a moment, smacking his lips and tasting the full flavor of it, and then startled expression spread across his face. He swayed like a reed in the wind. He shivered from head to food. His teeth rattled. He batted his eyes. His mouth opened and closed; he could no longer say nothing. Then he sank slowly into a chair. He was no longer fit to be tied."

Beebe attributes the quotes above to "The Bon Vivant's Companion", edited by Herbert Asbury.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some folks expressed some interest in which cocktails were added to the second edition of the Savoy Cocktail Book, so I made a list. I've also scanned the pages. They're too big to post on eGullet. If you're interested, drop me a PM and I'll be happy to send them to you.

Recipes in the "New and Additional Cocktails" section are:

Albert Keller Cocktail

Atlantis Cocktail

Bacardi Cocktail

Bamboo Cocktail

Blackthorn Cocktail (No. 2)

Booksellers' (Special) Pride

Clam Juice Cocktail

Devonshire Pride

DOM Cocktail

Fly Fisher's Cocktail

Golden Dawn

Gun Cotton

Hercules Cocktail

Jazz Cocktail

Jersey Lightning

Lone Tree Cocktail

Love Potion Cocktail

Lulu's Favourite

Monk Cocktail

Roosevelt Pick-Me-Up

Silent Third Cocktail

Summit Cocktail

Tomato Juice Cocktail

After the above there is one final page titled "Miscellaneous Drinks"

the cocktails on that page are:

Gin Sling "See the Formula for this on page 190. This is much

improved by the addition of the juice of half a lemon"

John Collins "See the Formula for this on page 190. Dry Gin should be

used in preference to Hollands Gin."

Pousse Cafe

Planter's Punch

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_51780_4191_22237.jpg

Blue Monday

¼ Cointreau (20ml Cointreau)

¾ Vodka (60ml Vodka-O)

1 Dash Blue Vegetable Extract (2 drops Queen Blue food colour)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

We find that blue drinks have an alluring visual appeal that beckons one to dive headlong into their cooling embrace. This one didn’t disappoint and proved to be our pick of the evening. This cocktail showed a degree of complexity bellied by the simplicity of the ingredients, and all complemented by a rounded, viscous mouth feel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_51780_4191_16917.jpg

Blue Train

¼ lemon juice (20ml freshly squeezed lemon juice)

¼ Cointreau (20ml Cointreau)

½ dry Gin (40ml Tanqueray)

1 Dash Blue Vegetable Extract (1 drops Queen Blue food colour)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Whilst this recipe is very similar to the Blue Devil (Cointreau rather that Maraschino), we found that the lemon tended to over power the other ingredients. We’re not sure if that is because the Cointreau is less able to stand up to the acidity than the Maraschino or whether it is due to our switch to Tanqueray in preference to the Bombay Sapphire we used in the Blue Devil, or was it just a difference in our mood? We will be very interested to see what others think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Blue Blazer history.

According to Lucius Beebe in "The Stork Club Bar Book", the Blue Blazer was invented by Professor Jerry Thomas in 1849 while he was working at the El Dorado bar here in San Francisco.

The story goes, a patron came into the bar and demanded of Professor Thomas that he, "Fix me some hell-fire that will shake me right down to my gizzard."

"Professor Thomas smiled and quietly poured a tumbler of Scotch Whisky into one of the mugs, followed by a slightly smaller quantity of boiling water.  Then with an evil smelling sulphur match, he ignited the liquid, and as the blue flame shot toward the ceiling and the crowd fell back in awe, he hurled the blazing mixture back and forth between the two mugs, with a rapidity and dexterity that was well nigh unbelievable.  This amazing spectacle continued in full movement for perhaps ten seconds, and then the professor poured the beverage into a tumbler and smothered the flame.  He stirred in a spoonful of pulverized white sugar into the mixture, added a twist of lemon peel, and shoved the smoking concoction across to the booted and spurred giant.

"'Sir,' said Professor Thomas, bowing, 'The Blue Blazer!'

"The boastful miner threw back his head and flung the boiling drink down his throat.  He stood motionless for a moment, smacking his lips and tasting the full flavor of it, and then startled expression spread across his face.  He swayed like a reed in the wind.  He shivered from head to food.  His teeth rattled.  He batted his eyes.  His mouth opened and closed; he could no longer say nothing.  Then he sank slowly into a chair.  He was no longer fit to be tied."

Beebe attributes the quotes above to "The Bon Vivant's Companion", edited by Herbert Asbury.

This is a charming story, but alas it is most unlikely that it has the added advantage of being true. I'll save specifics for my book, but it should be noted that nowhere did Thomas actually claim to have invented the drink, while others did claim it with some degree of plausibility.

As for execution: there is no need to preheat the whisky. That's certainly something that would not have been possible in an old time saloon. The best way I've found to make this drink work is to pour the boiling water into the mug, briefly stir in the sugar, and then carefully pour the whiskey in on top, in effect layering it (and yes, a cask-strength single malt is very useful here). The water volatizes the whisky, and then it should light. When pouring, also never pour more than half a mug at a time. This keeps the flames going.

I wish I could post film here....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Blue Blazer history.

According to Lucius Beebe in "The Stork Club Bar Book", the Blue Blazer was invented by Professor Jerry Thomas in 1849 while he was working at the El Dorado bar here in San Francisco.

The story goes, a patron came into the bar and demanded of Professor Thomas that he, "Fix me some hell-fire that will shake me right down to my gizzard."

"Professor Thomas smiled and quietly poured a tumbler of Scotch Whisky into one of the mugs, followed by a slightly smaller quantity of boiling water.  Then with an evil smelling sulphur match, he ignited the liquid, and as the blue flame shot toward the ceiling and the crowd fell back in awe, he hurled the blazing mixture back and forth between the two mugs, with a rapidity and dexterity that was well nigh unbelievable.  This amazing spectacle continued in full movement for perhaps ten seconds, and then the professor poured the beverage into a tumbler and smothered the flame.  He stirred in a spoonful of pulverized white sugar into the mixture, added a twist of lemon peel, and shoved the smoking concoction across to the booted and spurred giant.

"'Sir,' said Professor Thomas, bowing, 'The Blue Blazer!'

"The boastful miner threw back his head and flung the boiling drink down his throat.  He stood motionless for a moment, smacking his lips and tasting the full flavor of it, and then startled expression spread across his face.  He swayed like a reed in the wind.  He shivered from head to food.  His teeth rattled.  He batted his eyes.  His mouth opened and closed; he could no longer say nothing.  Then he sank slowly into a chair.  He was no longer fit to be tied."

Beebe attributes the quotes above to "The Bon Vivant's Companion", edited by Herbert Asbury.

This is a charming story, but alas it is most unlikely that it has the added advantage of being true. I'll save specifics for my book, but it should be noted that nowhere did Thomas actually claim to have invented the drink, while others did claim it with some degree of plausibility.

As for execution: there is no need to preheat the whisky. That's certainly something that would not have been possible in an old time saloon. The best way I've found to make this drink work is to pour the boiling water into the mug, briefly stir in the sugar, and then carefully pour the whiskey in on top, in effect layering it (and yes, a cask-strength single malt is very useful here). The water volatizes the whisky, and then it should light. When pouring, also never pour more than half a mug at a time. This keeps the flames going.

I wish I could post film here....

youtube?

Here is a link to Andreas Masso, famed London Mixologist, making a Blue Blazer:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=78...8536&q=cocktail

Anyhow, what sources would Lucius Beebe have drawn upon to make his conclusions?

I have tried to make a Blue Blazer a few times, and I have been lucky to emerge untinged, and as hairy as ever. But the drink was not spectacularly made and was just a toddy with a bit of acrobatics, and lots of "fearing for the worst" (from me).

Cheers!

George

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is a charming story, but alas it is most unlikely that it has the added advantage of being true. I'll save specifics for my book, but it should be noted that nowhere did Thomas actually claim to have invented the drink, while others did claim it with some degree of plausibility.

[...]

I wish I could post film here....

Yes, this particular telling does seem to have a mythic element, which made me question its veracity. You will note that I was at pains to say things like, "According to..." and "...attributes to...".

Still, a very compelling story, that I think does capture a vivid picture of the mid-19th century saloon. Or if you want to get really persnickety, a vivid picture of the mid-20th century idea of what it was like in a mid-19th century saloon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gallery_51780_4191_22237.jpg

Blue Monday

[...]

That does have a beautiful hue.

One slightly odd thing about the Blue Monday...

In "The Official Mixer's Manual" Patrick Duffy gives it the alternate name Caucasian. He also states the Blue Vegetable Extract is optional. Not sure if he means the drink is a Caucasion if it doesn't have the coloring.

In "The Big Lebowski" the Cohen Brothers have their character "The Dude" refer to his White Russians as Caucasians. Though, I wonder if that is because the character seems to be leaving out the Coffee Liqueur and just making them with cream and vodka. Am I remembering that right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Blue Train

¼ lemon juice (20ml freshly squeezed lemon juice)

¼ Cointreau (20ml Cointreau)

½ dry Gin (40ml Tanqueray)

1 Dash Blue Vegetable Extract (1 drops Queen Blue food colour)

[...]

Researching the Blue Train Special for tonight...

I came across a recipe for the Blue Train Cocktail which contains violet liqueur. In this case, I see the cocktaildb recipe calls for a dash of the now defunct "Creme Yvette".

Another parallel with the Aviation! Main difference again being the Cointreau vs. Maraschino.

The cocktaildb is so cool! If only it included the specific source for each recipe... Cocktaildb v.2?


Edited by eje (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_27569_3038_13339.jpg

Blue Train Special Cocktail (for 6)(2 -eje)

Fill the shaker with cracked ice and pour into it 1 glass of Brandy (1 oz Korbel VSOP) and 1 glass Pineapple Syrup (3/4 oz pineapple juice, 3 tsp superfine sugar, stir to dissolve).  Shake carefully, and then add 3 glasses of Champagne (3 oz Segura Viudas Brut Reserva Cava).  Give one or two more shakes and serve without further delay.

As usual, I am halving the recipe by assuming two ounces per "glass" and then making half. This one seemed a bit small.

I'll give decoding this my best.

Blue Train likely candidates.

1) South African luxury train.

2) Train from Paris to Calais, "Le Train Bleu".

3) "Splendid Belle Epoque restaurant in the heart of the Gare de Lyon railway station." Also, "Le Train Bleu".

You may remember a certain Barney Barnato from the Barney Barnato Cocktail. When Barney Barnato died, he left his two year old son an heir to his millions. When this son, (Joel) Woolf Barnato, grew up, he became quite the bon vivant. His enthusiasms included car racing, Bentleys, drinking, and parties. He and his friends were called "The Bentley Boys". They competed in various European motor races. In fact, Woolf Barnato won the Le Mans race three times out of three starts, a record that has not been beaten to this day.

In March of 1930, Woolf Barnato was at a party in Cannes. Some speculation arose about the speed of the cars among the attendees. Many wondered if it was possible for someone to race the famous express rail, "Le Train Bleu," and beat it from Paris to Calais. Woolf pooh poohed this idea, and said his custom Bentley could get to London before the train got to Calais. Bets were laid and Woolf wagered 200 pounds he could get to his favorite club in London before The Blue Train arrived in Calais.

The next day, when "Le Train Bleu" left the Paris station, with the assistance of a second driver, Barnato departed simultaneously. Barnato reached Calais the next morning at 10:30 AM, and took his car on the ferry across the channel. He arrived at the Conservative Club on St. James Street 4 minutes before the Blue Train arrived in Calais.

I would guess a champagne cocktail or two might be in order.

From then on he called his custom Bentley "The Blue Train Special". He even had a bar built into the dashboard.

The cocktail is rather tastier than I expected. Sweet, fizzy, and slightly exotic. Just the ticket for a Bright Young Thing during London's exuberant 30s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_27569_3038_41517.jpg

Blues Cocktail (for 6)(2 - eje)

Take 4 Glasses of Whisky. (4 oz Bernheim Wheat Whiskey)

1 Glass of Curacao. (1 oz Brizard Orange Curacao)

Incorporate 1 Teaspoonful of Syrup of Prunes. (1/2 teaspoon Prune Syrup)

Pour out over plenty of cracked ice and shake (stir - eje) for longer and more thoroughly than usual. Serve very cold.

This Cocktail removed the Blues if you have them and gives you the Blue Devils if you haven't.

Another favorite of mine among Savoy Quotes.

The cocktail is a bit on the sweet side. Stirred in a frozen glass with cracked ice and served very cold, quite tasty. To get the prune syrup, I did buy prunes, so I figured, why not add them as a garnish? Give you a bit of fiber with your cocktail. And, hey, turns out, whiskey soaked prunes are not bad at all.

Thought I'd throw a bit of a changeup with the whiskey. Been getting a bit predictable using the Sazerac 6, when nothing is specified. I think the Bernheim was a good choice. The dry leanness of the wheat whiskey complements the sweetness of the Curacao nicely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_27569_3038_348932.jpg

Bobby Burns Cocktail.*

1/2 Italian Vermouth (1 1/2 oz Carpano Antica)

1/2 Scotch Whisky (1 1/2 oz Compass Box Asyla)

3 Dashes Benedictine (Barspoon Benedictine)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

*One of the very best Whisky Cocktails.  A very fast mover on Saint Andrews Day.

I am inclined to agree with the authors of The Savoy. Boy, I enjoyed this cocktail. The complexity of the Bitter Vermouth, the briny Scotch, the slight sweet herbaceousness of the Benedictine, all highlighted with the brightness of the lemon zest. Just about everything I like in a brown liquor cocktail in a single glass. It really doesn't get much better than this.

Actually, whipped this one up a few weeks ago in celebration of Burns Night, a fine tradition celebrating the life and works of Scottish Poet, Robert Burns. I first learned about Burns Night a few years ago while listening to the radio shows of the late John Peel.

From Burns' Poem "A Bottle and Friend":

Here's a bottle and an honest friend!

What wad ye wish for mair, man?

Wha kens, before his life may end,

What his share may be o'care, man?

Then catch the moments as they fly,

and use them as ye ought, man.

Believe me, happiness is shy,

and comes not aye when sought, man.

Now I'm not sure if this cocktail, or the similar "Robert Burns Cockail", were actually named after the poet in question. And probably he would disapprove of sullying Scotch with water and other questionable materials. Still, on that night, we raised a glass to his memory and wished him well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_51780_4191_26559.jpg

Blues Cocktail

Take 4 Glasses of Whisky. (2 oz Canadian Club)

1 Glass of Curacao. (1/2 oz Cointreau)

Incorporate 1 Teaspoonful of Syrup of Prunes. (1/4 teaspoon Prune Syrup)

We made our own prune syrup by simmering 1/2 a cup of prune juice for about 10 minutes and then adding 3 teaspoons of simple syrup for sweetness

Pour out over plenty of cracked ice and shake for longer and more thoroughly than usual. Serve very cold.

As we used Cointreau rather than coloured Curacao our Blues cocktail lacked the hansom orange colour that Eirk's had :sad: Non the less it was quite a refreshing drink, and the prescription; to "shake for longer and more thoroughly than usual", produced a pleasant raft of fine ice chips on the surface of the drink.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem with writing these things after I try the cocktail is I always forget some of the things I want to say...

The cocktaildb recipe for the Blues Cocktail is a bit different than the Savoy.

It calls for 2 oz Bourbon, 1/4 oz Prunella (a prune-plum based liqueur), and 1/4 oz of Blue Curacao.

Proportions are not that far off. I would guess the prune syrup was a sub for the relatively hard to find Prunella. Or perhaps vice versa, as the inclusion of Blue Curacao makes me think it is a more recent recipe than the one in the Savoy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bacardi Cocktail

1/4 Lemon Juice or Lime Juice (3/4 oz Lime Juice)

1/4 Grenadine (3/4 oz home made grenadine)

1/2 Bacardi Rum ( 1 1/2 oz Flor De Cana Extra Dry Rum)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass

Third cocktail from the "New and Additional Cocktails" section of the Second edition of the Savoy Cocktail Book.  Despite anti-grenadine sentiment to the contrary, in my opinion, the first decent cocktail of the supplement.

Recent correspondence from eGullet member jazzyjeff shows that the Bacardi cocktail was actually part of the original first pressings of the Savoy.  Not sure how to explain.  Here is his picture.

gallery_27569_3038_209.jpg

It looks like it was a recipe that was mislaid; but, that the publisher, authors or editors felt strongly enough about the Bacardi Cocktail to insert a part of a page to the first edition of the Savoy cocktail book.

The Bacardi cocktail was then included in the "New and Additional Cocktails" section of the second edition.

After reading the above and other posts in this thread regarding the contents of different editions of the Savoy book, I'm completely puzzled as to what edition it is that I recently acquired, which I thought was a first. The (not numbered) page 25 of my book has a "Bacardi Special Cocktail" but no Bacardi Cocktail, and certainly no paste-in. But my copy doesn't have a "New and Additional Cocktails" section, it has a section headed simply "Additional Cocktails", which has only nine entries on two pages, the very first of them being the Bacardi Cocktail. It doesn't include a bunch of the other cocktails mentioned as being in the "New and Additional" section. Interestingly, the "Additional Cocktails" section of my copy is not listed in the volume's table of contents, which lists "Concluding Remarks" on page 280, and "Blank Pages for Additions" on page 282, which is where "Additional Cocktails" actually is, while the blank pages begin on page 284. The title page (there is no separate copyright page) reads, at the bottom, "LONDON:/CONSTABLE & COMPANY, LTD./1930" (slashes indicating line breaks). Is my copy perhaps a first edition, second state? Were two extra pages printed and bound in with the original pages, replacing two of the lined "blank" pages?

I hope the obsessiveness of my interest in this (I'm a book collector in a small way as well as a cocktail enthusiast) will fit right in in this obsessive thread.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One slightly odd thing about the Blue Monday...

In "The Official Mixer's Manual" Patrick Duffy gives it the alternate name Caucasian.  He also states the Blue Vegetable Extract is optional.  Not sure if he means the drink is a Caucasion if it doesn't have the coloring.

In "The Big Lebowski" the Cohen Brothers have their character "The Dude" refer to his White Russians as Caucasians.  Though, I wonder if that is because the character seems to be leaving out the Coffee Liqueur and just making them with cream and vodka.  Am I remembering that right?

Okay, so The Big Lebowski may be my favorite movie of all time...I had to re-watch a few scenes to clarify this :wink: Almost every time The Dude asks for a drink, it's for a white russian, EXCEPT in one scene at the bowling alley, and in one scene at Jackie Treehorn's house where he appears to use "white russian" and "caucasian" interchangeably. In every scene you see the drink being made, there's Khalua involved. My personal favorite is when he makes a white russian at Maude's using powdered coffee creamer instead of cream :wacko:

ETA: By the way, this thread is awesome. I've learned so much from this already, and you're only on "B"!


Edited by Nishla (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_51780_4191_30160.jpg

Bolo Cocktail

The Juice of ¼ Lemon or ½ Lime (we made two versions one using freshly squeezed juice of ¼ lemon and the other freshly squeezed juice of 1/2 lime)

The juice of ¼ orange (freshly squeezed juice of ¼ Orange)

½ Wineglass Bacardi Rum (2 oz Havana Club Anejo Blanco)

1 Teaspoon Sugar (Whoops perhaps that’s what was missing :blush:)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

The version of the recipe that we finally decided upon was the result of a little (very) research and a deal of discussion between Erik and our selves. The omission of the sugar was due to tiredness more than any conscious decision that it was superfluous, although there was some discussion as to the exact quantity that might be required in this recipe. We found the cocktail, as we mixed it, to have all its flavour and impact at the front of the palette and feel that the addition of the sugar (syrup, probably a something less than the full teaspoon) would work well to give the drink a fuller flavour. Whether lime or lemon was used the drink was very refreshing, and quite appropriate for our current summer climate. Rum and citrus go together so well, and drinking this drink even in the winter months would be appropriate as it would immediately transport ones thoughts to warmer climes :cool:

Whilst we were tasting this cocktail, there was some discussion as to the merits of using gold or even dark rum in this recipe.  The fuller flavour of either of these might go a long way toward filling out the palette of this drink.

A project for another day perhaps  :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The second "first edition" that I have sounds exactly the same as yours. On the first inside page of the book however, it has a small stamp on the bottom right saying "With the complements of Booth's Distilleries Ltd." It has a two page advertisment for Booth's Gin before the title page. It also has the "Additional Cocktails" section you mention in it.

Is it possible that this is a special Booth's edition of the book or do all British copies have this two page advertisment? Maybe due to Prohibition, it did not appear in the American first edition?

Thanks for your observations. My copy does not have the Booth's advert pages. I don't think it has the stamp you mention, but I don't have it in front of me, so I can't swear to that. But I'd certainly have noticed a two-page advertisement. So I can answer your question about all British copies with a "no".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[...]

The second "first edition" that I have sounds exactly the same as yours. On the first inside page of the book however, it has a small stamp on the bottom right saying "With the complements of Booth's Distilleries Ltd." It has a two page advertisment for Booth's Gin before the title page. It also has the "Additional Cocktails" section you mention in it.

Is it possible that this is a special Booth's edition of the book or do all British copies have this two page advertisment? Maybe due to Prohibition, it did not appear in the American first edition?

[...]

Interesting. I was wondering why most of the gin based cocktails in the "New and Additional Cocktails" section of my edition specified "Booth's Gin".

Also interesting that the "Bacardi Cocktail" was added to the first American edition and not the English edition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also interesting that the "Bacardi Cocktail" was added to the first American edition and not the English edition.

Perhaps you missed where jazzyjeff said:
there is an English first editon for sale on Abebooks with the Bacardi Cocktail slip.
From the Abebooks listing:
There is a bound-in erratum slip between pages 24 & 25 with the recipe for "Bacardi cocktail"
This refers to the 1930 Constable edition. Presumably this copy does not have the "Additional Cocktails" section present in my 1930 Constable copy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×