• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

hzrt8w

Pictorial: Joong/Jongzi-Sticky Rice/Bamboo Leaves

52 posts in this topic

The store here didn't have the split mung beans, so I bought whole ones, and they're not yellow, but green.  Will this make too big of a difference or should I omit them?

The green color is from the shells of mung beans. The shells are a little bit hard and not desirable to be used to make joong. My advice is to skip them if you can't get the shelled mung beans.


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the great help. I was able to find the right mung beans and chestnuts. The only thing I didn't find was dried conpoy. I had never heard of it, and the ladies at the market didn't know what it was either, so I left it out. They were surprised I was making these, "Why you want to do this? It take soooo long." I buy the little packages premade at the store, but they were nothing like these. The ones they sell don't have all of the little goodies and are mostly rice. These were so much better.

The experience was great. It was a pretty extensive process and I ended up with about 15 little packages. They were great, and it was with great satisfaction that I ended up with one for Saturday night's dinner and one for a midnight snack. I froze the rest.

I wish I knew about conpoy and if they would have made a great difference. They look rather like dried scallops, or some kind of dried seafood, so I'm thinking they would have been great.

The dried shrimp are intense in taste, but I'm just not used to them. I wanted to use fresh shrimp sauteed with onions -- but that's just the South Louisiana coming out in me. I stuck to the authentic version, and I'm glad I did.

Again, thanks for all of the help. The joongzi were a lot of fun to make. My packages weren't as neat as the ones here, and some I had to use an extra leaf to wrap the outside, but I didn't have any seepage so they held up in the cooking process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I wish I knew about conpoy and if they would have made a great difference.  They look rather like dried scallops, or some kind of dried seafood, so I'm thinking they would have been great.

The dried shrimp are intense in taste, but I'm just not used to them.  I wanted to use fresh shrimp sauteed with onions -- but that's just the South Louisiana coming out in me.  I stuck to the authentic version, and I'm glad I did. 

Again, thanks for all of the help.  The joongzi were a lot of fun to make.  My packages weren't as neat as the ones here, and some I had to use an extra leaf to wrap the outside, but I didn't have any seepage so they held up in the cooking process.

What? No Pictures? :blink:

Conpoy is another name for dried scallops. It gets confusing sometimes with all these different names: mangetout for snow peas, aubergine for eggplant...

Conpoy adds lovely flavour to joong or jook (congee). Because they are more expensive, people like me often substitute with dried shrimp. I do use conpoy when my supply has lots of broken pieces.

Fresh marinated shrimp would not be the same in joong. You'd miss the intense flavour for the amount of rice involved. The texture wouldn't be the same either. It'd be better to enjoy your fresh Louisianna shrimp along side of the joong. :biggrin:

How many leaves did you use for each packet? Mine are quite large and I use 3 leaves for each one. I am down to the last dozen I made last summer. My 9 year old grandson can out-eat any adult. :wacko:

http://www.hillmanweb.com/soos/joong2.html


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Typically I used 3-4 leaves, depending on how well I was doing on each one. On some, I took an additional leaf and wrapped around the outside before tying them up. They weren't all uniformly shaped, but that just adds to their character. :raz:

Thanks for the advice on the fresh shrimp. And I'll definitely try to find the conpoy next time.

Yeah--no pictures. I wanted to take them but the charger is missing on my camera. Next time I will definitely take some pictures to remember the occasion.

Thanks again. It was great fun.


Edited by PopsicleToze (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My teenager and I made these yesterday. Forgive us, but we could not find some of the ingredients (we do not have any decent Asian markets in our area :angry: ) and also we do not eat pork, so we made some adjustments to your recipe. Also, we never had these before so we weren't sure what to expect. Right or wrong - we were very, very happy with the results and they were delicious!!! We had the laptop on the kitchen counter and we followed your pictorial in assembling and making our packages. Thank you for posting the pictorial. The instructions are clear and easy to follow - even for someone like me, who has never eaten joong/jongzti before. (I don't even know how to pronounce it)

The ingredients that we used: Chinese sweet rice seasoned as recommended, green mung beans (yellow could not be found!), dried shrimp (could not find conpoy), dried mushroom, vegetarian chorizo-style sausage, and peanuts. We sauteed the veggie sausage and mushrooms together. Ingredients (after soaking) ready for assembly:

gallery_51874_6146_122323.jpg

We made about 25 packages (two pots full). Our wrapping is inartful but they held together! :laugh:

gallery_51874_6146_199281.jpg

After we boiled them for 2 hours, we removed the wrappers and found extreme yumminess inside! The bamboo leaves imparted the most delicious flavor and scent to the rice and filling. I could definitely get addicted to these.

gallery_51874_6146_59393.jpg

gallery_51874_6146_232022.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Those are beautiful!!  And they are very easy to eat for breakfast, lunch, dinner and late snack. :wub:

Thanks for your kind comment, and I agree completely, these can be eaten at any time of day.

I forgot to mention how much we both liked the aroma exuded while the packages were boiling - a very grassy, almost tea-like scent that filled the kitchen. I will definitely make these again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My teenager and I made these yesterday.

We made about 25 packages (two pots full).  Our wrapping is inartful but they held together!  :laugh:

gallery_51874_6146_232022.jpg

Your first attempt looks delicious! I love how the ingredients look juicy and melding into the rice. The chorizo would add a nice spicy flavour.

If you don't eat pork, you might try a Malaysian version with beef rendang that Tepee suggested many posts ago. The recipe can be found thru' google, but I used the one from Cradle of Flavour.

If you've never eaten joong before, then the rendang wouldn't confuse you the way it did with my family who are used the traditional version I usually make. It didn't stop them from devouring all the packets tho'! :laugh:


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Your first attempt looks delicious! I love how the ingredients look juicy and melding into the rice. The chorizo would add a nice spicy flavour.

If you don't eat pork, you might try a Malaysian version with beef rendang that  Tepee  suggested many posts ago. The recipe can be found thru' google, but I used the one from Cradle of Flavour.

If you've never eaten joong before, then the rendang wouldn't confuse you the way it did with my family who are used the traditional version I usually make. It didn't stop them from devouring all the packets tho'! :laugh:

Thank you so much for the compliment! Can I ask how "joong" is pronounced? I am embarrassed to say that I don't know (although mine may not technically be "joong" since they have a phony filling :wink: )

I actually don't eat any meat, except for chicken, but others in my family do eat meat, so the next time that I make these, I think I will make several different fillings. It seems like a versatile technique and I just cannot get over how much flavor the bamboo leaves imparted to the contents!

ETA: My local market did not have any salted eggs, but they did have some eggs that were labeled "preserved" and they were solid black (both the yolks and the egg white). I did not purchase these as they did not look like the ones shown above in the pictorial. Would the preserved eggs have been a good addition? To be honest, they were not visually appealing but I do not know how they would taste. The shop owner just shook his head at me when I picked up the package!


Edited by kbjesq (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They look great K!!!

What brand of veggie sausage did you use?

Hey Randi! Wish I could share some with you . . . the phony sausage was just whatever brand that Publix sells. As you know, choices are limited around here! :wink:

Do you think the seniors would like joong?? :laugh::laugh::laugh:

Seriously, even though this was my first taste, I definitely consider this some serious comfort food. It was really, really good. I wasn't sure that I would like the texture of the rice because I don't normally like soft rice at all, but the flavors melded (sp?) together so well that it was just a unique experience. And very yummy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you so much for the compliment! Can I ask how "joong" is pronounced? I am embarrassed to say that I don't know (although mine may not technically be "joong" since they have a phony filling :wink: )

I actually don't eat any meat, except for chicken, but others in my family do eat meat, so the next time that I make these, I think I will make several different fillings. It seems like a versatile technique and I just cannot get over how much flavor the bamboo leaves imparted to the contents!

ETA: My local market did not have any salted eggs, but they did have some eggs that were labeled "preserved" and they were solid black (both the yolks and the egg white).

Joong is pronounced like the name "Joan" except with a "down accent" if that makes any sense!

You can make rendang with chicken instead of beef if that helps.

The shop owner did the right thing shaking his head. The preserved eggs are for eating out of the shell with pickled ginger or diced to put into congee (Chinese rice porridge - comfort food). They definitely would not be a good addtion for joong.

I am so far away from my supply of joong at the moment, and I want some! :sad:


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joong is pronounced like the name "Joan" except with a "down accent" if that makes any sense!

But, if you speak "proper" Toysanese, then it is doong :laugh::raz: .


Edited by Ben Hong (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to try this recipe, and freeze the Joong. Can someone tell me if you have to steam all of the joong and then freeze or can you freeze them after they are wrap??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would like to try this recipe, and freeze the Joong. Can someone tell me if you have to steam all of the joong and then freeze or can you freeze them after they are wrap??

You absolutely need to cook the rice (and the rest of the ingredients) first before freezing the joong for storage.


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read online that the Dragon Boat Festival is June 23. Will anyone else be making joong/jongzi? It is my goal to find the necessary authentic ingredients this year, which means I have to start early. Unfortunately there are no well-stocked Asian markets nearby!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To practice wrapping, I made one pot of vegetarian joong today. I was able to include yellow split mung beans, black mushroom, dried shrimp, peanuts, and soy sausage with supplies on hand. I will have to make a road trip to a good Asian market to find chestnuts, conpoy and Chinese sausage.

joong.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I won't be able to make mine until July 1st - a long weekend for me - as my teaching keeps me too busy!

I haven't made any since my mother passed away 2 years ago, and my kids and extended families are requesting the ones that "you and Po-Po used to make". I pretty much need the whole weekend to make the +100 or so to fill many tummies.

Maybe my daughter will come home that weekend and we can carry on the tradition of Mother and Daughter Joong session! She learned how with Po-Po. :wub:

Here's the link to our 3-generation joong session:

http://www.hillmanweb.com/soos/joongzi.html


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My mother gave me two joong the other week. She didn't make them, they were given to her by one of the old Hakka aunties, so she didn't know what was inside. I don't really don't like the nut filled ones, give me the fatty belly pork, lap cheung ones everyday. So i was massively disappointed when both turned out to be nut! Such was my disgust with the nut affair I decided to make my own. There are loads of ways to wrap a joong but I've been taught to make the pillow shaped ones. Depending on the size of the leaves you can use two or three. You know I don't think I've ever eaten a triangular joong!

I thought I had some siu yuk in the freezer but when I came to look there was none. So i had to make do with just lap cheung, lap yuk and some conpoy. Anyone else wrap them this way?

20120617a.JPG

20120617b.JPG

20120617c.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Prawn, you ever found conpoy in the UK?

Only ever seen dried shrimp.


“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Prawn, you ever found conpoy in the UK?

Only ever seen dried shrimp.

Never, I always have a stash in the freezer from previous trips to Hong Kong. I sometimes get given them as gifts from relatives too. I don't think you can buy them in this country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anyone else wrap them this way?
Yes, my mother wraps them in rectangular pillow shapes. I don't like peanut ones either. I like the pork belly ones with green mung bean and salted duck egg yolks (been ages since I've had one so the duck egg might be a false memory). I think chestnuts would be a good addition.

Best Wishes,

Chee Fai.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Duvel
      “… and so it begins!”
       
      Welcome to “Tales from the Fragrant Harbour”!
      In the next couple of days I am hoping to take you to a little excursion to Hong Kong to explore the local food and food culture as well as maybe a little bit more about my personal culinary background. I hope I can give you a good impression of what life is like on this side of the globe and am looking very forward to answering questions, engaging in spirited discussions and just can share a bit of my everyday life with you. Before starting with the regular revealing shots of my fridge’s content and some more information on myself, I’d like to start this blog and a slightly different place.
      For today's night, I ‘d like to report back from Chiba city, close to Tokyo, Japan. It’s my last day of a three day business trip and it’s a special day here in Japan: “Doyou no ushi no hi”. The “midsummer day of the ox”, which is actually one of the earlier (successful) attempts of a clever marketing stunt.  As sales of the traditional winter dish “Unagi” (grilled eel with sweet soy sauce) plummeted in summer, a clever merchant took advantage of the folk tale that food items starting with the letter “U” (like ume = sour plum and uri = gourd) dispel the summer heat, so he introduced “Unagi” as a new dish best enjoyed on this day. It was successful, and even in the supermarkets the sell Unagi-Don and related foods. Of course, I could not resist to take advantage and requested tonight dinner featuring eel. Thnaks to our kind production plant colleagues, I had what I was craving …
      (of course the rest of the food was not half as bad)

      Todays suggestion: Unagi (grilled eel) and the fitting Sake !
       

      For starters: Seeweed (upper left), raw baby mackerel with ginger (upper right) and sea snails. I did not care for the algae, but the little fishes were very tasty.
       

      Sahimi: Sea bream, Tuna and clam ...
       

      Tempura: Shrimp, Okra, Cod and Mioga (young pickled ginger sprouts).
       

      Shioyaki Ayu: salt-grilled river fish. I like this one a lot. I particularly enjoy the fixed shape mimicking the swimming motion. The best was the tail fin
       

      Wagyu: "nuff said ...
       

      Gourd. With a kind of jellied Oden stock. Nice !
       

      Unagi with Sansho (mountain pepper)
       

      So, so good. Rich and fat and sweet and smoky. I could eat a looooot of that ...
       

      Chawan Mushi:steamed egg custard. A bit overcooked. My Japanese hosts very surprised when I told them that I find it to be cooked at to high temperatures (causing the custard to loose it's silkiness), but they agreed.
       

      Part of the experience was of course the Sake. I enjoyed it a lot but whether this is the one to augment the taste of the Unagi I could not tell ...
       

      More Unagi (hey it's only twice per year) ...
       

      Miso soup with clams ...
       

      Tiramisu.
       

      Outside view of the restaurant. Very casual!
      On the way home I enjoyed a local IPA. Craft beer is a big thing in Japan at the moment (as probably anywhere else in the world), so at 29 oC in front of the train station I had this. Very fruity …

       
      When I came back to the hotel, the turn down service had made my bed and placed a little Origami crane on my pillow. You just have to love this attention to detail.

    • By liuzhou
      One of my local supermarkets recently installed a sesame seed pressing facility and is now producing sesame oil and sesame paste. Their equipment toasts and extracts the oil and the residue is turned into the paste. Of course, I bought some of each.
       
      I have only used the oil so far. It tastes and smells more intensely than any I have bought before. The aroma also seems to last longer in a dish.
       

       
      These are the white seed versions. They also do black seed oil and paste which I haven't bought yet.
       
      Neither has any brand label - only a bar code on the back so that the check-out staff can deal with it.
       
      I am sorely tempted to try this recipe from Carolyn Philips for celtuce with sesame oil, paste and seeds. I'll let you know how I get on with this or any other recipe. Suggestions welcome, as always.
    • By liuzhou
      I think you’ll see in a moment why I didn’t just post this on the Lunch! topic. It was exceptional. An epic and it has been an epic sorting through the 634 photographs I took in about three hours. If I counted correctly, there are only 111 here.
       
      Like so many things, it came out of the blue. I was kind of aware that there was a Chinese holiday this week, but being self-semi-employed I am often a man of leisure and the holidays make little impact on my life. This one is in celebration of the Dragon Boat Festival (端午节 duān wǔ jié) and although it features nothing boat-like, it was festive and there is a dragon link.
       
      It started with this invitation which appeared on my WeChat (Chinese social media) account.
       

       
      Longtan (龙潭 lóng tán) means Dragon’s Pool and is more of a hamlet. It is about an hour’s drive north of Liuzhou city. I’d never heard of it and certainly never been there, but a friend of a friend had decided that a “foreign friend” would add just the right note to the planned event. I’ve seen many pictures of such “Long Table“ lunches and even attended one before – but this one was different and I was delighted to be invited.
       
      So, I was picked up outside my city centre home at 9 am and the adventure began. We arrived at the village at 9:45 to be met by the friend in question. He led me to what appeared to be the head man’s home, outside which was a large courtyard with a few men sitting at a trestle table seemingly finishing a breakfast of hot, meaty rice porridge washed down with beer or rice wine. I was offered a bowl of the porridge, but declined the beer or rice wine in favour of a cup of tea. After downing that and making introductions etc, I was left to wander around on my own watching all the activity.
       
       

       

      Rice Porridge
       
      Here goes. I'm posting these mostly in the order they were taken, in order to give some sense of how the event progressed.
       

       
      These two men were the undisputed kings of this venture, organising everyone, checking every detail, instructing less  experienced volunteers etc. It was obvious these men had been working since the early hours. and their breakfast was a break in their toil. There were piles of still steaming cooked pork belly in containers all over the courtyard.
       

      Some of this had been the meat in the rice porridge, I learned.
       
       

      This young lad had been set to chopping chicken. Not one chicken! Dozens.
       

       

       

       

       

      Entrails, insides and fat were all carefully preserved.
       
      In the meantime, the two masters continued boiling their lumps of pork belly. This they refer to as 五花肉 - literally "five flower" pork", the five flowers being layers of skin, fat and meat.
       

       

       
      Another man was dealing with fish. Carp from the village pond. He scaled and cleaned them with his cleaver. Dozens of them. 
       

       

       

       

       
      And all around, various preparations are being prepared.
       

      Peeling Garlic
       

       

      Gizzards and intestines.
       

      More Pork . You can see the five layers here.
       
      to be continued
       
    • By Soul_Venom
      The best Chinese food restaurant I have ever been to is a place called the Imperial Buffet in Aberdeen SD. Their General Tso's is unlike the Tso's anywhere else. The closes comparison I could make is the Orange Chicken at the Panda Garden only 3x better. Their Lo-Mein Noodles are done with the skill of a master Italian pasta chef & perfectly seasoned. They also used to do a mean fried squid. I say used to because they had it when I lived in Aberdeen from 02-04 but didn't when I visited in 15'. One of their other discontinued specialties was a dish advertised as 'Golden Fried Cauliflower'. Note, this was NOT a breaded product. The cauliflower was cooked as though it had been boiled perfectly. It was not greasy as I recall but was a golden orange color as was the sauce it was evidently cooked in. I never could identify the flavors in that sauce. I wish I could describe it better but it has been well over a decade since I had it. Is anyone familiar with it or something similar? I can't seem to find anything like it online & all my searches just bring up links to breaded deep-fried crap.
    • By liuzhou
      An old friend from England contacted me yesterday via Facebook with a couple of questions about Five Spice Powder.

      Thought there me be some interest here, too.

      Is there anything more typically Chinese than five spice powder (五香粉 - wǔ xiāng fěn)?
       
      Well, yes. A lot.
       
      Many years ago, I worked in an office overlooking London’s China town. By around 11 am, the restaurants started getting lunch ready and the smell of FSP blanketed the area for the rest of the day. When I moved to China, I didn’t smell that. Only when I first visited Hong Kong, did I find that smell again.
       
      In fact, FSP is relatively uncommon in most of Chinese cuisine. And if I ever see another internet recipe called “Chinese” whatever, which is actually any random food, but the genius behind it has added FSP, supposedly rendering it Chinese, I’ll scream.

      I get all sorts of smells wafting through the neighbourhood. Some mouth-watering; some horrifying. But I don't recall ever that they were FSP.
       
      But what is it anyway? Which five spices?
       
      Today, I bought four samples in four local supermarkets. I would have would have preferred five, but couldn’t find any more. It's not that popular.
       
      First thing to say: none of them had five spices. All had more. That is normal. Numbers in Chinese can often be vague. Every time you hear a number, silently added the word ‘about’ or ‘approximately’. 100 km means “far”, 10,000 means “many”.
       
      Second, while there are some common factors, ingredients can vary quite a bit. Here are my four.

      1.


       
      Ingredients – 7
       
      Star Anise, Fennel Seed, Orange Peel, Cassia Bark, Sand Ginger, Dried Ginger, Sichuan Peppercorns.
       
      2.
       

       
      Ingredients – 6
       
      Cassia Bark, Star Anise, Fennel Seed, Coriander, Sichuan Peppercorn, Licorice Root.

      3.
       

       
      Ingredients – 15
       
      Fennel Seeds, Sichuan Peppercorns, Coriander, Tangerine Peel, Star Anise, Chinese Haw, Cassia Bark, Lesser Galangal, Dahurian Angelica, Nutmeg, Dried Ginger, Black Pepper, Amomum Villosum, Cumin Seeds, Cloves.

      4.
       

       
      Ingredients – 6
       
      Pepper (unspecified – probably black pepper), Sichuan Peppercorns, Star Anise, Fennel Seeds, Nutmeg, Cassia.
       
      So, take your pick. They all taste and smell almost overwhelmingly of the star anise and cassia, although there are subtle differences in taste in the various mixes.
       
      But I don’t expect to find it in many dishes in local restaurants or homes. A quick, unscientific poll of about ten friends today revealed that not one has any at home, nor have they ever used the stuff!
       
       
      I'm not suggesting that FSP shouldn't be used outside of Chinese food. Please just don't call the results Chinese when you sprinkle it on your fish and chips or whatever. They haven't miraculously become Chinese!

      Like my neighbours and friends, I very rarely use it at all.

      In fact, I'd be delighted to hear how it is used in other cultures / cuisines.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.