Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

A Tale of Two Fish Markets


Recommended Posts

(N.B.: shamelessly cross-posted from my blog.)

I've been thinking a lot about fish lately, prompted by a project I'm beginning on fish in Roman culture and literature. It's not a bad thing to work on here, since it gives me the excuse to do some research on fish in modern Italy. By "research", of course, I mean mostly "eating"-- but I've been looking into fish in other ways as well.

You wouldn't think it from visiting coastal Italy (or, for that matter, an inland city like Rome), but the Mediterranean is actually relatively fish-poor, at least compared to the ocean. Modern fishing techniques mean that it's not too hard to get a variety of fish to market. But some parts of the peninsula have historically had better access to fish than others, and that access is reflected on a consumer level by the presence of large fish markets. I'm going to look at two of these, from opposite ends of Italy.

The first of these is pretty famous, the Rialto fish market in Venice. Venice's lagoon, with its shallow, brackish water, is a great environment for attracting the wide variety of fish that are the hallmark of Venetian cuisine. The importance of fish for Venice is highlighted by the elegant architecture of the market.

160133335_d6b5197d44.jpg

The structure, built in 1907, is a wide portico with room for two rows of stalls, facing onto the Grand Canal. It's easily the loveliest fish market I've ever seen (okay, not that much competition there...) The column capitals along the outside are all in the shape of different fish, boats, etc.:

160133337_a3cb6b7adf.jpg

I didn't see any turtles for sale at the market! But these guys are pretty cute. The architect (whom my guidebook lists as the painter Cesare Laurenti) was clearly having some fun, while maintaining a traditional Venetian appearance.

As the city of Venice has shrunk (there are about 60,000 people in central Venice, down from 200,000 a century ago), the importance of the market has decreased. Restaurants buy a lot of fish, of course, but they mostly get it from the wholesale market, and while tourists might buy an apple or cherries, a whole mackerel or bag o' shrimp doesn't tend to fit well into a suitcase! As a result, when I was there (late May), the market was only about half-occupied by stalls, and many of the people walking around were (like me) tourists with cameras, rather than shoppers.

Too bad, because the seafood there is absolutely gorgeous. I'm pretty bad with seafood names (in English or Italian)- so please feel free to help me out in comments... Here's one I do know, some nice looking red mullets:

160133338_4413e77a9c.jpg

They're particular favorites of mine, both because the Romans loved 'em (as pets and as food), and because, hey: "red mullet". hee!

There's a lot of care put into displaying fish (it helps that I arrived at around 8 AM, when things were just starting to gear up):

160133340_c13c9dacee.jpg

Here are some canocce: alien-looking crustaceans that are very characteristic of Venice. I don't know if they live elsewhere:

160133334_f3ff5d046a.jpg

I love those "eyes". This is a close-up, obviously, but lots of the vendors stack them up like so much fishy cordwood. We had canocce for dinner that night (at Alle Testiere); they're sweet and tender, sort of between really fresh Gulf shrimp and crab.

Here's a bucket o' eels:

160135353_f3958a6fdc.jpg

Still alive: that one in the center was flapping its gills and glaring balefully at me. I have to admit something here and say that eels squick me out a little, and this guy didn't really change things for me...

The fruit and vegetable market is right next to the fish market. There's a nice selection, but it didn't strike me as especially distinctive:

160133341_c63d2983a2.jpg

Hey you! Get back to the piazza San Marco! (And memo to shoppers: be sure to wash that eggplant well!

The other fish market I've visited that really impressed me was way at the other end of Italy, in Syracuse. Sicilian seafood is of course famous, and rightly so. Like Venice, Sicilians have been able to exploit their environment to get access to lots of different kinds of seafood. In this case, the straits of Messina provide naturally good fishing grounds. The small space creates a difference in temperature between the western and eastern Mediterranean, something that attracts fish. And the narrow straits funnel fish, making them easier to catch.

The market in Syracuse is on the island of Ortygia, steps away from the temple of Apollo and next to the small harbor. It stretches for about two or three blocks on a small street. Not as picturesque as the Venice market, but with at least as good a selection of fish, and with a more vibrant atmosphere.

Here are some anchovies. Or maybe sardines. I'm not really sure, actually:

160129677_a1cdfc1c84.jpg

To misquote Maurice Chevalier, "thank heaven for leetle feesh!" I've really come to love the miniature members of the scaly tribe: alici sott'olio? Oh yeah. It's a real shame that Americans are so fixated on steak fish (salmon, tuna, etc.); I'm sure whether I'll be able to get them back in the US. Anyway, it's an excuse to eat as many as possible now...

160129669_49b0d284b4.jpg

I don't know what this thing is. But it kind of scares me. Probably it's delicious, but I wouldn't have the faintest idea what to do with it. Other than back away slowly...

160129681_8028121857.jpg

Again, not really sure what these are. I just think they're really beautiful. As with these:

160129686_2583d6bccf.jpg

Let's just call those last photos "two studies in stripes."

Finally, the biggest fish in the market that day, a nice-looking tuna:

160129623_9a0b607594.jpg

Everybody is impressed (and rightly so), even that kid in the corner. Yum!

I love Syracuse; it's a beautiful, friendly city with wonderful food and a fascinating history. One of my fantasies-- once I win the lottery, you know-- is to move there and just cook fish every single day. Someday, maybe...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mackeral. Be-ooo-tiful fish. With such a flashy striped coloration, it's no wonder the word mackeral is derived for the French word for pimp, according to Alan Davidson.

Great photos, Andrew. And let me know if you need a research assistant.

PS: Both John Yi's and Golden Seafood featured sardines this spring at the Reading Terminal Market; but gone now. Whole Paycheck still has 'em at the outrageous price of about $9 pp, vs. $3 at the RTM when they were there. Of course, the sardines here are herring, a different fish than you'll find in the Med, but just as tasty in its own way, and cookable the same way, too.

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mackeral. Be-ooo-tiful fish. With such a flashy striped coloration, it's no wonder the word mackeral is derived for the French word for pimp, according to Alan Davidson.

Not to mention "holy mackerel!" Nobody ever said "holy mullet!" (Except maybe for Robin. When he and Batman were attacked by Redneckman.)

PS: Both John Yi's and Golden Seafood featured sardines this spring at the Reading Terminal Market; but gone now. Whole Paycheck still has 'em at the outrageous price of about $9 pp, vs. $3 at the RTM when they were there. Of course, the sardines here are herring, a different fish than you'll find in the Med, but just as tasty in its own way, and cookable the same way, too.

I'll keep my eyes open for them when I get back. It seems odd to marinate herring in olive oil: but then, there's pickled herring, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are some canocce: alien-looking crustaceans that are very characteristic of Venice.  I don't know if they live elsewhere:

160133334_f3ff5d046a.jpg

Did you get to eat these guys.. How were the prepared, how do them come served.. Shell or no shell. How did they taste.. They look really sweet... Do they have that fat resevoir in the head that shrimp do? How much were they? They all have this pathetic "please dont eat me face"

Edited by Daniel (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did you get to eat these guys.. How were the prepared, how do them come served.. Shell or no shell. How did they taste.. They look really sweet... Do they have that fat resevoir in the head that shrimp do? How much were they? They all have this pathetic "please dont eat me face"

I did try them that night. They were served as part of an antipasto plate, cooked very simply and served sort of on the half-shell, with the inside carapace removed. As I mentioned above, they were sweet (though not especially distinctive), sort of like shrimp crossed with crab. At the restaurant, the price was expensive- but everything in Venice is expensive. I don't remember how much the raw canocce are; if I have a photo with the price market, I'll let you know.

I do love their little "eyes"; those are actually their tails. And the blue stripe limning their tails is just terrific. Don't remember about the heads: I think they were served headless.

The weird thing about seafood antipasto in Venice (this is based on the vast experience of two meals, mind you) is that it's served warm. It's usually been my experience in Italy that seafood starters are served at room temperature or slightly chilled; but there you go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think that most of the fish was local, and wild, but I'm not 100% sure. Italian fish markets (like Italian vegetable markets) are supposed to mark where there products come from. I'm not sure whether they have to say whether fish is farmed or not; and I don't remember noticing any signs.

I do remember noticing that some of what was for sale in Venice had come from elsewhere. Shrimp, in particular, seemed to a large measure to come from Sicily or other southerly places.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Lovely photgraphs and comments Andrew.

This fellow is a Saber fish (Trichiurus lepturus ) *click*. They are fairly common (even in US waters). Very popular in Sicily when I was there (at the Syracuse market actually) and also popular in Hong Kong.

Basically they are cut into sections and fried. Flesh is mild and similar to a very fresh mackeral/sardine.

I think that the banded fish above the mackeral are pilot fish and the small fish are definately anchovies.

Edited by Adam Balic (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beautiful report, Andrew! There is nothing like the fish markets of Europe in the US. Not only is there an incredible variety, beuatifully presented, they are all immaculately fresh - at least at the larger markets such as Rialto, Ortygia, the Vucciria in Palermo, Boqueria in Barcelona and the market in San Sebastien. The last is the most pristine, but I agree the Rialto is the most beautiful of all the markets I have been to in Europe or elsewhere.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did you get to eat these guys.. How were the prepared, how do them come served.. Shell or no shell. How did they taste.. They look really sweet... Do they have that fat resevoir in the head that shrimp do? How much were they? They all have this pathetic "please dont eat me face"

I did try them that night. They were served as part of an antipasto plate, cooked very simply and served sort of on the half-shell, with the inside carapace removed. As I mentioned above, they were sweet (though not especially distinctive), sort of like shrimp crossed with crab. At the restaurant, the price was expensive- but everything in Venice is expensive. I don't remember how much the raw canocce are; if I have a photo with the price market, I'll let you know.

I do love their little "eyes"; those are actually their tails. And the blue stripe limning their tails is just terrific. Don't remember about the heads: I think they were served headless.

The weird thing about seafood antipasto in Venice (this is based on the vast experience of two meals, mind you) is that it's served warm. It's usually been my experience in Italy that seafood starters are served at room temperature or slightly chilled; but there you go.

These guys are mantis shrimp. If you look carefully you can see there real eyes and the praying mantis like front claws.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This fellow is a Saber fish (Trichiurus lepturus ) *click*. They are fairly common (even in US waters). Very popular in Sicily when I was there (at the Syracuse market actually) and also popular in Hong Kong.

Basically they are cut into sections and fried. Flesh is mild and similar to a very fresh mackeral/sardine.

Saber fish, eh? A badass name for a badass fish. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are some canocce: alien-looking crustaceans that are very characteristic of Venice.  I don't know if they live elsewhere:

160133334_f3ff5d046a.jpg

Did you get to eat these guys.. How were the prepared, how do them come served.. Shell or no shell. How did they taste.. They look really sweet... Do they have that fat resevoir in the head that shrimp do? How much were they? They all have this pathetic "please dont eat me face"

We have them in Naples as well. Fantastic to make a pasta sauce. They have a funny name in neapolitan dialect that I cannot remeber right now... (i'll think about it).

There is not much meat in them, and once you it the pasta, usually uou can snap the head and suck out the juicy soft meat.

Ciao

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are some anchovies.  Or maybe sardines.  I'm not really sure, actually:

160129677_a1cdfc1c84.jpg

To misquote Maurice Chevalier, "thank heaven for leetle feesh!"  I've really come to love the miniature members of the scaly tribe: alici sott'olio?  Oh yeah.  It's a real shame that Americans are so fixated on steak fish (salmon, tuna, etc.); I'm sure whether I'll be able to get them back in the US.  Anyway, it's an excuse to eat as many as possible now...

Those look like anchovies to me.

Actually, when (if) you do return to the states, be sure to ask you favorite fish-monger if you don't see fresh sardines. In general, they are readily available to east-coast wholesalers but not many markets display them because it takes valuable space away from the steak fishes you mention. When I was living in Boston, Whole Foods had them in the display a couple of times a week because there was still a fairly sizeable Portuguese population that knew how good they are.

As for anchovies, the only place I have seen them sold at a fish market is in San Diego so you may be out of luck but I would still ask.

Get back to the eating.

Stephen Bunge

St Paul, MN

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, when (if) you do return to the states, be sure to ask you favorite fish-monger if you don't see fresh sardines.  In general, they are readily available to east-coast wholesalers but not many markets display them because it takes valuable space away from the steak fishes you mention.  When I was living in Boston, Whole Foods had them in the display a couple of times a week because there was still a fairly sizeable Portuguese population that knew how good they are.

Yeah, I'll try asking around once I'm back. Because ohhh, they are so good.

Get back to the eating.

Yes, sir!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(N.B.: shamelessly cross-posted from my blog.)

Here are some anchovies.  Or maybe sardines.  I'm not really sure, actually:

160129677_a1cdfc1c84.jpg

160129669_49b0d284b4.jpg

I don't know what this thing is.  But it kind of scares me.  Probably it's delicious, but I wouldn't have the faintest idea what to do with it.  Other than back away slowly...

The top ones are Alici (fresh anchoives) that once cured in salt get the name of "Acciughe".

The second one is a Pesce Bandiera which I think is known as "garfish" in English and its fillets are fantastic.

Ciao

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps the photo is deceptive but the Pesce Bandiera looks like a ribbon! Garfish have more girth. The face looks familiar, and the teeth!

In Cajun country we used to catch garfish in canals and make what we call a roast (pot roasted on the stove) stuffed with lots of garlic. Or the meat would be rolled into boulettes (meatballs) and fried. Wonderful stuff! You don't see that very much these days, unfortunately, and I suppose restaurants can't serve them for some reason (never seen it in a restaurant).

I would be curious to know how this fish is cooked elsewhere.

Edited by My Confusing Horoscope (log)

Scorpio

You'll be surprised to find out that Congress is empowered to forcibly sublet your apartment for the summer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps the photo is deceptive but the Pesce Bandiera looks like a ribbon! Garfish have more girth. The face looks familiar, and the teeth!

In Cajun country we used to catch garfish in canals and make what we call a roast (pot roasted on the stove) stuffed with lots of garlic. Or the meat would be rolled into boulettes (meatballs) and fried. Wonderful stuff! You don't see that very much these days, unfortunately, and I suppose restaurants can't serve them for some reason (never seen it in a restaurant).

I would be curious to know how this fish is cooked elsewhere.

Sea garfish in English these chaps below. American freshwater gars are another fish again (a very primative fish), the three are not closely related. However, Andrew's fish does occur in American waters (although not commercially fished it appears).

gallery_1643_1753_467586.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finally, the biggest fish in the market that day, a nice-looking tuna:

160129623_9a0b607594.jpg

Everybody is impressed (and rightly so), even that kid in the corner.  Yum!

Hello, i'm a new member of this forum.

I'm from Calabria in the south of Italy and i'm very passioned for pizza and bread making with sourdough and... fish hunting and cooking.

I joined the forum because the big fish in photo isn't a tuna but a wonderful Ricciola, "Seriola Dumerilii", a "Carangide", named in Italy "la regina del Mediterraneo", the queen of Mediterranean Sea and of South Atlantic for his delicious white fillets. I participated whith friends to capture it, cooked and eated with them near the Jonian sea and i love also the Red Tuna ( present in Italy but required very much for japanese market ).

Regards

Francesco

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finally, the biggest fish in the market that day, a nice-looking tuna:

160129623_9a0b607594.jpg

Everybody is impressed (and rightly so), even that kid in the corner.  Yum!

Hello, i'm a new member of this forum.

I'm from Calabria in the south of Italy and i'm very passioned for pizza and bread making with sourdough and... fish hunting and cooking.

I joined the forum because the big fish in photo isn't a tuna but a wonderful Ricciola, "Seriola Dumerilii", a "Carangide", named in Italy "la regina del Mediterraneo", the queen of Mediterranean Sea and of South Atlantic for his delicious white fillets. I participated whith friends to capture it, cooked and eated with them near the Jonian sea and i love also the Red Tuna ( present in Italy but required very much for japanese market ).

Regards

Francesco

Pitta,

Are you following me around? I love fish too and I use to go fishing in Calabria (we had a house near Calopezzati, Sibari-Rossano Calabro...) with my grandfather when I was very young. I then developed sea-sickness and could not do it anymore. Once My grandad caught a "Dentice" (Dentex- Bream) almost 1m long...

Anyway, the English name for Ricciola is Great amberjack, Mediterranean amberjack or Yellowtail.

Next time I pop into Billingsgate market, I will look for one.

Ciao

Edited by Pizza Napoletana (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finally, the biggest fish in the market that day, a nice-looking tuna:

160129623_9a0b607594.jpg

Everybody is impressed (and rightly so), even that kid in the corner.  Yum!

Hello, i'm a new member of this forum.

I'm from Calabria in the south of Italy and i'm very passioned for pizza and bread making with sourdough and... fish hunting and cooking.

I joined the forum because the big fish in photo isn't a tuna but a wonderful Ricciola, "Seriola Dumerilii", a "Carangide", named in Italy "la regina del Mediterraneo", the queen of Mediterranean Sea and of South Atlantic for his delicious white fillets. I participated whith friends to capture it, cooked and eated with them near the Jonian sea and i love also the Red Tuna ( present in Italy but required very much for japanese market ).

Regards

Francesco

Pitta,

Thanks for the information and welcome to eGullet! What other fish do you catch?

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finally, the biggest fish in the market that day, a nice-looking tuna:

160129623_9a0b607594.jpg

Everybody is impressed (and rightly so), even that kid in the corner.  Yum!

Hello, i'm a new member of this forum.

I'm from Calabria in the south of Italy and i'm very passioned for pizza and bread making with sourdough and... fish hunting and cooking.

I joined the forum because the big fish in photo isn't a tuna but a wonderful Ricciola, "Seriola Dumerilii", a "Carangide", named in Italy "la regina del Mediterraneo", the queen of Mediterranean Sea and of South Atlantic for his delicious white fillets. I participated whith friends to capture it, cooked and eated with them near the Jonian sea and i love also the Red Tuna ( present in Italy but required very much for japanese market ).

Regards

Francesco

Pitta,

Thanks for the information and welcome to eGullet! What other fish do you catch?

Hello,

I’m a read only member of several international forums, and yes yes, i follow with particular interest the posts of Pizza Napoletana for his great competence and his generosities in communicating important information on the italian cooking tradition. Generally, I read only the posts for my too much bad English in order to actively participate and to write ( ten minutes for two rows of text, this post an half hour ). But the passion for communication is more of the shame...

I hunted many years ago with my little boat customized for the “big game” :-), and with friends with the passion of fishing, “ricciole” ( greater amberjack ), “caponi” o “lampughe” ( small pompano dolphin ) , “tonnetti” ( bonito ), “cernie” ( grouper ), “spatole” or “pesci bandiera” or “pesci sciabola“ ( scabbard-fish) , “cocci” (crowner ), “scorfani” ( scorpion fish ), “merluzzetti”or “musdee” ( ling ), “sogliole” ( sole ), “rombi” ( brill ) and others. But I’m married now and with two sons, the little boat is too much expensive in time and money for my family life. I fish now from the beach and very rarely, “spigole” ( european sea bass ), “mormore” or “gaiole” ( striped seabream ), “triglie” ( mullet ), “saraghi” ( white seabream ) , “lecce” ( leerfish ), “orate” ( gilthead bream ) with the road “all’inglese” ( match style )...in wonderful Jonian Sea...

Sorry for my bad english ( and thanks to Google translator :-) ).

Regards and... ciao

Francesco

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Francesco,

Welcome to eGullet! And thank you for identifying the ricciola. I have had ricciola a few times in Sicily, and I agree that it's a wonderful fish. (Somewhere I have a photo of a really beautiful ricciola preparation from a restaurant in Taormina; I'd post it, but I'm having computer issues.)

I haven't spent a lot of time in Calabria, but the coast there is one of the most beautiful parts of Italy. And Reggio is a great town, especially along the waterfront. I'd love to go back: maybe do some fishing...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By daniel123456789876543
      I have been making pancetta for the first time. I have experience with the curing process doing things like bacon and cold smoked salmon in the past but this is the first time I have ever hanged anything.
       
      After a week of curing it has had 11 days  hanging so far (I was planning on taking it to 28 days hanging) Although I foolishly forgot to weigh it. 
      It smells really good like some awesome salami and the outer rim of the pancetta looks lovely and rich and dark.
      It was a recipe by Kuhlman in one of their charcuterie books.
      But when I inspected it today it had the mould growing on it as in the pics below. I have since scrubbed the mould off with white wine vinegar and returned it to the cellar. Is it wise to continue?
       
      Daniel
       
       
       


    • By shain
      Makes 40 cookies, 2 loaves. 
       
      50-60 g very aromatic olive oil
      80 g honey 
      120 to 150 g sugar (I use 120 because I like it only gently sweet) 
      2 eggs
      2 teaspoons of fine lemon zest, from apx 1 lemon 
      230 g flour 
      1 teaspoon salt 
      1 teaspoon baking powder 
      75 g lightly toasted peeled pistachios
      50 g lightly toasted almonds (you can replace some with pine nuts) 
      Optional: a little rosemary or anise seed
      Optional: more olive oil for brushing
       
      Heat oven to 170 deg C.
      In mixer (or by hand), mix oil, honey, sugar, lemon, egg and if desired, the optional spices - until uniform. 
      Separately mix together the flour, salt and baking powder. 
      Add flour mixture to mixer bowel with liquids and fold until uniform. Dough will be sticky and quite stiff. Don't knead or over mix. 
      Add nuts and fold until well dispersed. 
      On a parchment lined baking tray, create two even loaves of dough. 
      With moist hands, shape each to be rectangular and somewhat flat - apx 2cm heigh, 6cm wide and 25cm long. 
      Bake 25 to 30 minutes until golden and baked throughout, yet somewhat soft and sliceable. Rotate pan if needed for even baking. 
      Remove from tray and let chill slightly or completely. 
      Using a sharp serrated knife, gently slice to thin 1/2 cm thick cookies. Each loaf should yield 20 slices. 
      Lay slices on tray and bake for 10 minutes. Flip and bake for another 10-15 minutes until complelty dry and lightly golden. 
      Brush with extra olive oil, if desired. This will and more olive flavor. 
      Let chill completely before removing from tray. 
      Cookies keep well in a closed container and are best served with desert wines or herbal tea. 
       
        
    • By psantucc
      My own recipe, though influenced by many sources.
      Santucci's Practical Torrone (Christmas Nougat)
      180g honey (½ cup)
      100g egg whites (2 eggs)
      350g sugar (1 ½ cups)
      50g water (2 tablespoons)
      450g (1 pound) roasted nuts
      5-10 drops orange oil
      2 sheets (8 ½” x 11”) Ostia (aka wafer, edible paper)
      Combine honey, water, and sugar in a small saucepan. Bring to the boil over medium heat, stirring constantly. Skim foam (if any is seen) off the honey when it reaches the boil.
      In a stand mixer, whisk the egg whites until stiff peaks form.
      Cook the honey mixture to 280° F (137° C). Remove from the heat. With the mixer on high speed, slowly pour the mixture into the egg whites. Continue to whisk until volume has increased by about half and the mixture just starts to lose gloss – only about 5 minutes.
      Reduce the mixer speed and add the orange oil and nuts. When they are thoroughly mixed in, spread the resulting nougat over a sheet of Ostia. Try to cover the sheet as evenly as possible- the nougat is sticky and will make things difficult. When it is evenly covered, top with the other sheet of Ostia.
      Leave to cool and crystallize completely in the open air before cutting, preferably overnight.
      Note: I call this 'practical' Torrone because the recipe is made for home confectioners of reasonable skill to be able to easily understand what and how much to buy and what to do with it. The ingredient portions are biased for my country, the USA, but I saw no point in using English ounces for the weight-based version – those of us who prefer weight generally prefer it in grams.
      Tips and tricks:
      1.Keep nuts in a warm oven ( about 150° F / 65° C ) until you add them. Adding room temperature or colder nuts will reduce working time.
      2.Getting the nougat spread between sheets of Ostia is the trickiest part of the process. I use buttered caramel rulers on the outside edges of the bottom sheet, pour and press nougat in place, and then press the top layer on with an offset spatula. If you don't have caramel rulers, try spreading the nougat with an offset spatula, topping with the other sheet, and rolling with a pin to smooth. I advise against trying to cast the slab in any kind of fixed side pan, as the stickiness will make it very difficult to remove.
      3.Score the top layer of Ostia before cutting through. Once scored, a straight down cut with a Chef's knife works well. Cut into six 8 1/2” long bars and wrap in parchment or waxed paper to store, then cut into smaller rectangles to serve.
      4.There are many possible alternate flavorings. 1-10 Lemon oil or 1 t. (5 ml) vanilla or almond extract work well and are traditional flavors. Candied orange peel and/or orange zest can also be added.
      5.I use half pistachio and half almonds as the nuts. Hazelnuts (filberts) are also traditional. Any common nut should work.
      6.Ostia is available from confectionery suppliers. I get 8-1/2” x 11” sheets from www.sugarcraft.com under the name 'wafer paper'.
      This recipe is copyright 2009 by Patrick J. Santucci. Contact the author on eGullet under the username psantucc.
    • By Paul Bacino
      1 C Northern Beans soaked over-night in
      4-6C Water or Chxn Stock
      1/2 t Cayenne Pepper
      1//2 t Granulated garlic
      1 twig Dried oregano-- dried from last yr
      2 Bay
      pinch of salt ( yes ) and few pepper corns
      in the Morning; All into the Slow Cooker for 5 hrs. ( Crock Pot )
      I removed half the liquor and added chicken stock here back in . to this I added diced cooked Italian sausage about 1 whole .. simmer in a pot.. I transferred to... then add 1/2 head of shopped chicory ( curly endive ) finish cooking 15 mins
      cheers
      Most measurements again are from feel
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...