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Roti canai dough.


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I want to make silky, stretchy roti cenai dough like

this guy

(a pale imitation would do!).

How do I get it so incredibly elastic? Is it the flour (wheat, rice, corn?) or the method? (I know, and a lot of practice - but I did say a pale imitation would do for starters!)

I looked back over the eGullet feature on Indian breads from a good while back, and there is some good stuff there, but nothing on this exact technique.

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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Here's the roti canai thread where I asked about making roti like the kind you want but I still havent gotten around to trying Dim Sim's recipe.  :raz:

Thanks for pointing me to that thread, I hadn't found it myself.

The ingredients are pretty similar to what I've been using - but I cannot anywhere near approximate that extreme stretchiness. Surely there must be something in the technique. What is it?

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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the secret is the flour they use. the closest match i've been able to get so far is one called "continental sharps" in sydney. it has a coarse feel to it and is high in gluten. it's a strong bread flour which also makes beautiful pizza dough and bread. in the past, i used to use bread flour from the supermarket, but really, there is no comparison. unfortunately, it comes in convenient 10kg bags, but i've found that it is quite versatile, since i can use it to make other things (not cakes tho).

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Thanks for the advice tetsujustin and whisks.

Last nights batch was significantly better after prolonged kneading - it seems that the rule of thumb is knead until exhausted, then continue for the same length of time again.

I will try to source some higher gluten flour here in Brisbane, and post a report.

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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