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Cookbooks Published in 2006


ludja
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My wishlist for Spanish cookbooks keeps on expanding...

I took out Cookng from the Heart of Spain: Food of La Mancha by Janet Mendel from the library recently and it really looks interesting.

click

Some recipes which caught my eye so far:

salpicon of beef and ham

lemon salad with shrimp (used flesh of lemon)

salad of pickled partridge or chicken

green bean salad with grepes and anise

Capuchin tortilla wiht asparagus and breadcrumbs

eggplant timbale

chewy walnut cookies

orange-scented lard cookies

pastry squares w/pumpkin cream filling

fried cinnamon pumpkin slices

Lots of intriguing recipes.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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  • 3 weeks later...

I got Happy in the Kitchen. too and this cookbook is on par with Bouchon and French Laundry as far as the recipes, techniques and oh the pictures? They are beautiful too. A great cookbook. I am of the opinion that if you can successfully make recipes out of either French Laundry or Bouchon then you should be able to successfully make the recipes in Happy in the Kitchen. It is really about having the confidence to do it .

I also got Braise for Christmas and have not delved into it yet, but looking forward to it. :biggrin:

Edited by kristin_71 (log)
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Kristin, may i suggest to look at Happy in the Kitchen from another angle? i never had any interest or time to make anything from French Laundry ( i do have the book and read through it but this is not just my style of cooking)

On the other hand i cooked many dishes from Richards' book and what a joy it is: and many dishes don't tax on your time - tuna beet tartare, asparagus on asparagus (or romaine on romaine), or potato all crust gratin to name just a few. Or consider squid schnitzel - so much fun to make and to eat!

I think this book is a must in every cookbook library, novice or expert: all of us who are just happy to be in the kitchen and cook!

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The Soul of a New Cuisine: A Discovery of the Foods and Flavors of Africa by Marcus Samuelsson

I have looked through this extensively. There was a piece about Marcus in the November Food and Wine and it included some fantastic recipes that I think were in the book. It really explores the wonders of African cuisine, using the spics, vegetables and other things that make it unique. I am seriously considering buying it because it has alot of things I know I could personally make and really enjoy. Overall I thought it was a really good cookbook.

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Published in 2006:

The invasive Species Cookbook: Conservation through Gastronomy is available at www.bradfordstreetpress.com

Joe Franke

The Invasive Species Cookbook: Conservation through Gastronomy

www.bradfordstreetpress.com

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Here's a thread on a 2006 dessert cookbook from Kate Zuckerman at Chanterelle in NYC called: "The Sweet Life: Desserts at Chanterelle". click

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm always on the lookout for good Southern cookbooks and just recently heard some good reviews of The Lee Brother's Southern Cookbook: Stories and Recipes for Southerners and Would-be-Southerners which came out in late October 2006.

Here's a blurb from Amazon: click

From Matt Lee and Ted Lee, the New York Times food writers who defended lard and demystified gumbo comes a collection of exceptional southern recipes for everyday cooks. The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook tells the story of the brothers' culinary coming-of-age in Charleston--how they triumphed over their northern roots and learned to cook southern without a southern grandmother. Here are recipes for classics like Fried Chicken, Crab Cakes, and Pecan Pie, as well as little-known preparations such as St. Cecilia Punch, Pickled Peaches, and Shrimp Burgers. Others bear the hallmark of the brothers' resourceful cooking style—simple, sophisticated dishes like Blackened Potato Salad, Saigon Hoppin' John, and Buttermilk-Sweet Potato Pie that usher southern cooking into the twenty-first century without losing sight of its roots. With helpful sourcing and substitution tips, this is a practical and personal guide that will have readers cooking southern tonight, wherever they live.

Has anyone checked this out? Comments on how it would fit into a Southern Cookbook collection? I don't have a cookbook that focuses on Low Country cooking; would this be a good one?

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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  • 4 weeks later...

^I've since been able to check The Lee Brother's Cookbook out of the library and find that I love it! There is a slight emphasis on Low Food Cooking. I think they strike an interesting balance between classic and updated and original versions of recipes. The written backgrounds to each recipe are informative and fun to read. Although I have a lot of Southern cookbooks this will fill a new niche.

So, here are the cookbooks from 2006 that I think are on my "must have" list so far:

Lee Bros. Southern Cooking

Happy in the Kitchen Michel Richard

A Passion for Ice cream by Emily Luchetti

Baking from My Home to Yours Dorie Greenspan

Into the Vietnamese Kitchen by Andrea Nguyen

Possible:

Cookng from the Heart of Spain: Food of La Mancha by Janet Mendel

“Made in Italy” Georgio Locatelli

Has anyone seen this cookbook yet and have comments?

Black Forest Cuisine: The Classic Blending of European Flavors by Walter Staib and Jennifer McGlinn (Walter Staib is chef and proprieter of The City Tavern in Philadelphia and in this book covers the cuisine of his roots.)

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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  • 2 weeks later...
Has anyone seen this cookbook yet and have comments?

Black Forest Cuisine: The Classic Blending of European Flavors  by Walter Staib and Jennifer McGlinn  (Walter Staib is chef and proprieter of The City Tavern in Philadelphia and in this book covers the cuisine of his roots.)

Hmmm... I was hoping someone would reply since I'm interested as well.

Has anyone looked at The Patissier: Recipes and Conversations from Alsace? Three nice comments on Amazon, but that's all I've seen.

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I got a PR copy of the Lee Bros book from one of the papers I write for recently, Ludja. It's a great primer for overall Southern food, and it definitely focuses on the lowcountry touch. I find a few things odd about it--the Lee Bros seem to keep slipping Asian flavors and Texan chiles into dishes I don't think need these "twists," but overall the techniques and recipes look pretty solid. I plan to start cooking with it more in the coming weeks.

If you don't own any Southern food cookbooks, this one is large and comprehensive and wouldn't be a bad choice. Though I find it a little hard to say it's necessarily superior to some of the older titles out there like the Edna Lewis books (her last title, The Gift of Southern Cooking, being particularly fantastic). It's better than the Damon Lee Fowler book I own, New Southern Cooking, because the Lee Bros book is more comprehensive and has a better mix of the everyday and "downtown touch" recipes.

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I got a PR copy of the Lee Bros book from one of the papers I write for recently, Ludja. It's a great primer for overall Southern food, and it definitely focuses on the lowcountry touch. I find a few things odd about it--the Lee Bros seem to keep slipping Asian flavors and Texan chiles into dishes I don't think need these "twists," but overall the techniques and recipes look pretty solid. I plan to start cooking with it more in the coming weeks.

If you don't own any Southern food cookbooks, this one is large and comprehensive and wouldn't be a bad choice. Though I find it a little hard to say it's necessarily superior to some of the older titles out there like the Edna Lewis books (her last title, The Gift of Southern Cooking, being particularly fantastic). It's better than the Damon Lee Fowler book I own, New Southern Cooking, because the Lee Bros book is more comprehensive and has a better mix of the everyday and "downtown touch" recipes.

Good review; thanks for sharing your thoughts. They do add a few different twists in there but because I have a decent collection of Southern cookbooks the twists are not a negative for me. For many of the recipes I have alternate versiions. Also, although sometimes anachronistic tweaks can bother me, there is just something about their approach and the overall book that makes it still work for me. Partly, it's because I'm a little familiar with some of the more traditional versions and partley some of their tweaks sound interesting without being over the top.

I like most of Fowler's books and do have New Southern Cooking. My feeling for that book is "medium" although I am happy to have it as part of my collection. I think your point on the types of recipes in The Lee Bros. Cookbook is also a good one; a mix of "high" and "low or Sunday versions vs during the week fare as they sometimes mention.

If I was going to recommned one Southern cookbook for someone to start off with right now it might be the Edna Lewis and Scott Peacock book. Lovely photos, explanations and background and a great selection of dishes. For similar reasons, I agree with your endorsement of The Lee Bros Cookbook, but I appreciate having a background in the more traditional ways. Bill Neal's books were what started my interest in Southern Cooking and they are treasured by me. I'd recommend them to anyone interested in Southern cooking especially those with an interest in classical dishes. (There are no photos and a more unique selection of dishes which is why I might not recommend them as a first Southern cookbook depending on the person.)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Am I slow to be catching up with your post, ludja, almost 5 months late?

Tom Aitkens – too complicated to be attractive, and the design is not helpful; but doesn’t mean it tastes bad!

Made in Italy by Locatelli – fantastic; far better than the much promoted Silver Spoon, although by way of a note, the French version, La Cuillère d'Argent, was published in 2006.

I haven’t tried Nobu West but it looks interesting…

…and I’m sure you already caught up with HB’s In Search of Perfection – a book for reading and enjoying; the basic principle of improving simple English fare is not really what we would like to know from someone who is profiled as innovative.

Basically, at least from European viewpoint, 2006 was a poor year for decent books, with Locatelli and ‘Essence’ from David Everitt-Matthias being the two outstanding volumes.

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Basically, at least from European viewpoint, 2006 was a poor year for decent books, with Locatelli and ‘Essence’ from David Everitt-Matthias being the two outstanding volumes.

Baggy,

Could you tell us a bit more about Essence and its author? I haven't heard anything about it on this side of the pond.

BTW, there is a thread about the Locatelli book.

Cheers,

Geoff Ruby

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‘Essence’ from David Everitt-Matthias is a book with a very structured approach and full restaurant recipes (i.e. complex and resource intensive). Temperatures and methods are well defined with a strong sense of the ‘right way’ to do things. Local herbs are frequently used that, unfortunately, are difficult to find in usual retailers (not dissimilar to Marc Veyrat).

Generally in the classic French tradition with the typical English ‘lets improve it’ twist.

I’m convinced Ramsay would recruit Everitt-Matthias if they didn’t stylistically cook in the same way and would, therefore, compete.

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Am I slow to be catching up with your post, ludja, almost 5 months late?

Tom Aitkens – too complicated to be attractive, and the design is not helpful; but doesn’t mean it tastes bad!

Made in Italy by Locatelli – fantastic; far better than the much promoted Silver Spoon, although by way of a note, the French version, La Cuillère d'Argent, was published in 2006.

I haven’t tried Nobu West but it looks interesting…

…and I’m sure you already caught up with HB’s In Search of Perfection – a book for reading and enjoying; the basic principle of improving simple English fare is not really what we would like to know from someone who is profiled as innovative.

Basically, at least from European viewpoint, 2006 was a poor year for decent books, with Locatelli and ‘Essence’ from David Everitt-Matthias being the two outstanding volumes.

Thanks, Baggy! It is invaluable to get perspectives from Great Britain re: the books published there. I have been meaning to look at the Locatelli book but was not aware of "Essence"; thanks also for reminding me of "In Search of Perfection" as well.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Leite's Culinaria published their best 20 cook and food-related books of 2006. Here's the list: click

They chose Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma as their best book of the year. This is the only book which they described.

That being said, the work for which we reserve top honors this year isn’t a cookbook, but rather Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma. If you haven't read it, do yourself the favor. It's one of the most important food books to come along in memory. In it Pollan traces four meals back to their natural roots: a McDonald's lunch eaten on the go, a meal made with ingredients from Whole Foods, a chicken dinner cooked with foods from a small über-organic Virginia farm, and a banquet comprised of items Pollan foraged and hunted. You'll be fascinated, horrified, awestruck, and think twice about the foods you put in your body. Plus we guarantee you'll never look at corn the same way again.

Honorable Mentions:

In addition to our 20 best, honorable mentions go to A Culinary Traveller in Tuscany by Beth Elon (Little Bookroom), My Life in France by Julia Child with Alex Prud'Homme (Knopf), Keys to the Cellar by Peter Demeter (Wiley), The Cake Book by Tish Boyle (Wiley), and The Red Cat Cookbook by Jimmy Bradley (Clarkson Potter). 

The Ominivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan

Heat by Bill Buford

Mostly True by Molly O’Neill

The Nasty Bits by Anthony Bourdain

The Reach of a Chef by Michael Ruhlman

The United States of Arugula: How We Became a Gourmet Nation by David Kamp

Red, White and Drunk All Over by Natalie MacLean

Arabesque: A Taste of Morocco, Turkey and Lebanon by Claudia Roden

Cradle of Flavor by James Oseland

Into the Vietnamese Kitchen by Andrea Nguyen

Jamie’s Italy by Jamie Oliver

Kitchen Sense by Mitchell Davis

Lobel’s Meat and Wine by Stanley, Leon, Evan, Mark and David Lobel

The Lee Bros. Cookbook by Matt and Ted Lee

The Soul of a New Cuisine: A Discovery of the Foods and Flavors of Africa by Marcus Samuelsson

What to Drink with What You Eat by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page

Whole Grains Every Day, Every Way by Lorna Sass

Baking: From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan

The Essence of Chocolate by John Scharffenberger and Robert Steinberg

Tartine by Elisabeth Prueitt

I've read The Omnivore's Dilemma, Heat and The United States of Arugula. All very good and I wouldn't mind having copies of them.

Comments on any of chosen books?

Into the Vietnamese Kitchen, The Lee Bros: Southern Cookbook and Dorie Greenspan's book are already on my list.

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Leite's Culinaria published their best 20 cook and food-related books of 2006.  Here's the list: click

They chose Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma as their best book of the year. This is the only book which they described.

That being said, the work for which we reserve top honors this year isn’t a cookbook, but rather Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma. If you haven't read it, do yourself the favor. It's one of the most important food books to come along in memory. In it Pollan traces four meals back to their natural roots: a McDonald's lunch eaten on the go, a meal made with ingredients from Whole Foods, a chicken dinner cooked with foods from a small über-organic Virginia farm, and a banquet comprised of items Pollan foraged and hunted. You'll be fascinated, horrified, awestruck, and think twice about the foods you put in your body. Plus we guarantee you'll never look at corn the same way again.

Honorable Mentions:

In addition to our 20 best, honorable mentions go to A Culinary Traveller in Tuscany by Beth Elon (Little Bookroom), My Life in France by Julia Child with Alex Prud'Homme (Knopf), Keys to the Cellar by Peter Demeter (Wiley), The Cake Book by Tish Boyle (Wiley), and The Red Cat Cookbook by Jimmy Bradley (Clarkson Potter). 

The Ominivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan

Heat by Bill Buford

Mostly True by Molly O’Neill

The Nasty Bits by Anthony Bourdain

The Reach of a Chef by Michael Ruhlman

The United States of Arugula: How We Became a Gourmet Nation by David Kamp

Red, White and Drunk All Over by Natalie MacLean

Arabesque: A Taste of Morocco, Turkey and Lebanon by Claudia Roden

Cradle of Flavor by James Oseland

Into the Vietnamese Kitchen by Andrea Nguyen

Jamie’s Italy by Jamie Oliver

Kitchen Sense by Mitchell Davis

Lobel’s Meat and Wine by Stanley, Leon, Evan, Mark and David Lobel

The Lee Bros. Cookbook by Matt and Ted Lee

The Soul of a New Cuisine: A Discovery of the Foods and Flavors of Africa by Marcus Samuelsson

What to Drink with What You Eat by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page

Whole Grains Every Day, Every Way by Lorna Sass

Baking: From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan

The Essence of Chocolate by John Scharffenberger and Robert Steinberg

Tartine by Elisabeth Prueitt

I've read The Omnivore's Dilemma, Heat and The United States of Arugula. All very good and I wouldn't mind having copies of them.

Comments on any of chosen books?

Into the Vietnamese Kitchen, The Lee Bros: Southern Cookbook and Dorie Greenspan's book are already on my list.

I have read My Life in France and The Nasty Bits. Both were great books, but Julia's book is incredibly touching and a great look inside her life, and not just inside her cooking.

Preach not to others what they should eat, but eat as becomes you and be silent. Epicetus

Amanda Newton

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Cradle of Flavor by James Oseland

Into the Vietnamese Kitchen by Andrea Nguyen

[. . .]

Comments on any of chosen books?

We have been delighted with both of these books. I will give a special shout-out for Cradle of Flavor. Mr. Oseland tells the story behind each recipe, and lists suggested accompaniments for each dish. The recipes are very detailed and each step is clearly spelled out. This creates a certain amount of repetition, but avoids the need to flip to multiple sections of the book while cooking. Each step is numbered, so once you have toasted shrimp paste a few times it is easy to skip to step #2.

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Cradle of Flavor by James Oseland

Into the Vietnamese Kitchen by Andrea Nguyen

[. . .]

Comments on any of chosen books?

We have been delighted with both of these books. I will give a special shout-out for Cradle of Flavor. Mr. Oseland tells the story behind each recipe, and lists suggested accompaniments for each dish. The recipes are very detailed and each step is clearly spelled out. This creates a certain amount of repetition, but avoids the need to flip to multiple sections of the book while cooking. Each step is numbered, so once you have toasted shrimp paste a few times it is easy to skip to step #2.

Have you liked the results of the recipes you've tried? I've heard good things about the book in general, but nothing specific about the actual recipes.

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I will give a special shout-out for Cradle of Flavor. Mr. Oseland tells the story behind each recipe, and lists suggested accompaniments for each dish. The recipes are very detailed and each step is clearly spelled out. This creates a certain amount of repetition, but avoids the need to flip to multiple sections of the book while cooking. Each step is numbered, so once you have toasted shrimp paste a few times it is easy to skip to step #2.

Have you liked the results of the recipes you've tried? I've heard good things about the book in general, but nothing specific about the actual recipes.

We have been very pleased with the recipes from this book. Most have been outstanding and none have been less than good. Particular favorites include beef rendang, chicken rendang, shrimp sambal, nasi goreng, pan-seared fish with chiles and garlic, beef and chicken satay, fried potatoes with chile and shallot sambal, stir-fried Asian greens, braised lemongrass long beans, and coconut rice with lemongrass.

For what it is worth, several folks who are familiar with this part of the world have taken the time to comment on our dinner pictures. In general, they seem to think that the food at least look authentic (without benefit of a taste-test, of course). :raz:

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^ Thanks, C.sapidus. This book was not on my radar screen at all and it sounds great. I also saw that it was recently nominated for a James Beard Award.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Nominees : James Beard Foundation 2007 Books Awards click

Awards will be announced in early May. I spy at least two members of the eGullet Society on the list of nominees: Andrea Nguyen and Dorie Greenspan! There are other books also already mentioned on this thread in addition to quite a few others.

Asian Cooking:

Cradle of Flavor by James Oseland

Into the Vietnamese Kitchen by Andrea Nguyen

The Sushi Experience by Hiroko Shimbo

Baking and Dessert

Baking: From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan

Heirloom Baking with the Brass Sisters by Marilynn Brass and Sheila Brass

King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking by The Bakers at King Arthur Flour

Cooking from a Professional Point of View

Alain Ducasse’s Desserts and Pastries by Frederic Robert

Happy in the Kitchen by Michel Richard with Susie Heller and Peter Kaminsky

The Professional Chef, 8th Edition by The Culinary Institute of America

Entertaining

The Big Book of Appetizers Meredith Deeds and Carla Snyder

The Big Book of Outdoor Cooking and Entertaining by Cheryl Alters Jamison

Opera Lover’s Cookbook Francine Segan

Food of the Americas

Dishes from the Wild Horse Desert: Norteno Cooking of South Texas by Melissa Guerra

Kathy Casey’s Northwest Table by Kathy Casey

The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook by Matt Lee and Ted Lee

General

The Family Kitchen by Debra Ponzek

The Improvisational Cookbook by Sally Schneider

Tasty: Get Great Food on the Table Everyday by Roy Finamore

Healthy Focus

The Diabetes Menu Cookbook: Delicious Special Occasion Recipes for Family & Friends by Barbara Scott-Goodman and Kalia Doner

EatingWell Serves Two by Jim Romanoff

Whole Grains Every Day, Every Way by Lorna Sass

International

Arabesque by Claudia Roden

The Soul of a New Cuisine: A Discovery of the Foods and Flavors of Africa by Marcus Samuelsson

Spice by Ana Sortun

Reference

Culinary Biographies: A Dictionary of the World’s Great Historic Chefs, Cookbook Authors and Collectors, Farmers, Gourmets, Home Economists, Nutritionists, Restaurateurs, Philosophers, Physicians, Scientists, Writers and Others who Influenced the Way We Eat Today by Alice Arndt

The Organic Cook’s Bible by Jeff Cox

What to Eat by Marion Nestle

Single Subject

Braise by Daniel Boulud

The Essence of Chocolate by John Scharffenberger and Robert Steinberg

Vegetable Soups from Deborah Madison’s Kitchen by Deborah Madison

Wine and Spirits

Keys to the Cellar: Strategies and Secrets of Wine Collecting by Peter D. Meltzer

Romancing the Vine by Alan Tardi

The Wines of France: The Essential Guide for Savvy Shoppers by Jacqueline Friedrich

Writing on Food

Heat by Bill Buford

The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan

The United States of Arugula: How We Became a Gourmet Nation by David Kamp

Photography

Kaiseki: The Exquisite Cuisine of Kyoto’s Kikanoi Restaurant, Photographer: Masashi Kuma

Michael Mina, Photographer: Karl Petzke

Tartine, Photographer: France Ruffenach

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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2007 IACP Cookbook Award Finalists click

Awards will be announced in early April.

American Category

Dishes From the Wild Horse Desert: Norteño cooking of South Texas by Melissa Guerra

The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook: Stories and Recipes for Southerners and Would-be Southerners by Matt Lee and Ted Lee

Sharing the Table at Garland's Lodge by Amanda Stine and Mary Garland

Bread, Other Baking and Sweets Category

About Professional Baking by Gail Sokol

Baking: From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan

Bread Matters: The State of Modern Bread & a Definitive Guide to Baking Your Own by Andrew Whitley

Chefs and Restaurants Category: The California Table Grape Commission Award

Allegra McEvedy's Colour Cookbook by Allegra McEvedy & Fred Dickieson

Happy in the Kitchen by Michel Richard, Susie Heller and Peter Kaminsky

Heston Blumenthal: In Search of Perfection; Reinventing Kitchen Classics by Heston Blumenthal

Compilations Category

The 150 Best American Recipes: Indispensable Dishes from Legendary Chefs and Undiscovered Cooks by Fran McCullough and Molly Stevens

All-New Complete Cooking Light Cookbook by Anne C. Cain

The Professional Chef/the Culinary Institute of America-8th Edition by The Culinary Institute of America

First Book: The Julia Child Award

Into the Vietnamese Kitchen: Treasured Foodways, Modern Flavors by Andrea Nguyen

The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook: Stories and Recipes for Southerners and Would-be Southerners by Matt Lee and Ted Lee

Memories of Philippine Kitchens: Stories and Recipes from Far and Near by Amy Besa and Romy Dorotan

Food Photography and Styling Category

The Essence of Chocolate: Recipes for Baking and Cooking with Fine Chocolate Photographer: Deborah Jones, Food Stylist: Susie Heller

Secret Destinations: Asian spa cuisine Photographer: Edmond Ho, Food Stylist: Susie Donald

Simple Chinese Cooking Photographer: Earl Carter

Food Reference/Technical Category

Culinary Biographies by Alice Arndt

Modern Garde Manger by Robert Garlough

The Spice and Herb Bible, Second Edition by Ian Hemphill

General Category

The Filipino-American Kitchen: Traditional Recipes, Contemporary Flavors by Jennifer M. Aranas

The Improvisational Cook by Sally Schneider

Opera Lovers Cookbook: menus for elegant entertaining by Francine Segan

Health and Special Diets Category

Lunch Lessons: Changing the Way We Feed Our Children by Ann Cooper and Lisa M. Holmes

Spa Cuisine by Charlie Trotter by Charlie Trotter

William-Sonoma New Healthy Kitchen: Desserts byAnnabel Langbein

International Category: The Le Cordon Bleu Award

Cradle of Flavor: Home Cooking from the Spice Islands of Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore by James Oseland

Into the Vietnamese Kitchen: Treasured Foodways, Nodern Flavors by Andrea Q. Nguyen

The Soul of a New Cuisine: A Discovery of the Food and Flavors of Africa by Marcus Samuelsson

Literary Food Writing Category: The Cuisinart Award

The Kitchen Diaries: a year in the kitchen with Nigel Slater by Nigel Slater

My Life in France by Julia Child Alex Prud'homme

The United States of Arugula: How We Became a Gourmet Nation by David Kamp

Single Subject Category

Hot Chocolate: 50 heavenly cups of comfort by Fred Thompson

A Passion for Ice Cream: 95 Recipes for Fabulous Desserts by Emily Luchetti

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Wine, Beer or Spirits Category

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What to Drink with What You Eat: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food with Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea - Even Water - Based on Expert Advice from America's Best Sommeliers by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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