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Hummus: Additives, Techniques, Recipes


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I had a really good hummus at a restaurant recently that had a flavor I couldn't identify (but it was good!), so I asked. Allspice. I now add allspice to mine, which is pretty traditional otherwise.

Don't ask. Eat it.

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  • 1 month later...

Allspice! Hmm. Interesting. I asked my friend who supplied me the tahini what he did to make his hummus so light and smooth, and he said he liked to put it in the blender, walk away for ten minutes or so, and then come back. I only blend mine for around a minute. How long does everyone blend for?

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I have always made mine in the food processor and I have never thought about timing. Next time...

No doubt the blender would make it smoother than the processor???? But I HATE getting thick stuff out of the blender. Do you have some special process?

Darienne

 

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No doubt the blender would make it smoother than the processor???? But I HATE getting thick stuff out of the blender. Do you have some special process?

Just a rubber spatula. Any remaining film of hummus is the chef's privilege, to be removed with fingers (carefully) or heels of bread. I'm not sure that a blender is necessarily smoother than a food processor, though - is it?

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I'm not sure that a blender is necessarily smoother than a food processor, though - is it?

I was told by a chef with strong opinions that the blades of the blender are faster than a food processor's. That's why he made all his herbal oils, e.g., basil oil, in the blender. He said the faster blades retained the fresh green color of basil. In a food processor, the basil tended to oxidize. I've found that to be true, at least with basil oil, in my blender and food processor. I've also found that bread crumbs, made from toasted bread, pulverize finer in a blender. Can't say I've done an immense amt of research on blenders vs food processors in general (nor do I intend to).

I make hummus in the food processor myself. But then, I like a slightly chunky texture.

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Ok, so this thread sparked a hummus craving... And I'd also been wanting to see for myself whether skinning the chickpeas really makes for a smoother product. Made this batch in the blender -- which I also think smooths things out better than the food processor. My best hummus ever -- ultra creamy and pillowy soft... Just enough garlic and lemon... I go light on the olive oil in the hummus and light on the tahini -- maybe 2 Tablespoons of each for two 15 ounce cans of chickpeas. Rest of the liquid is chickpea water from the cans and lemon juice. Served with grilled flatbread and an eggplant/tomato/feta salad and it was heaven. I'm really looking forward to trying the "california style" posted earlier... And to trying to recreate the best hummus I've ever had, which had artichoke hearts pureed in it...

hummus!.JPG

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Ok, so this thread sparked a hummus craving... And I'd also been wanting to see for myself whether skinning the chickpeas really makes for a smoother product. Made this batch in the blender -- which I also think smooths things out better than the food processor. My best hummus ever -- ultra creamy and pillowy soft... Just enough garlic and lemon... I go light on the olive oil in the hummus and light on the tahini -- maybe 2 Tablespoons of each for two 15 ounce cans of chickpeas. Rest of the liquid is chickpea water from the cans and lemon juice. Served with grilled flatbread and an eggplant/tomato/feta salad and it was heaven. I'm really looking forward to trying the "california style" posted earlier... And to trying to recreate the best hummus I've ever had, which had artichoke hearts pureed in it...

So, did you peel those two 15-ounce cans of chickpeas by hand? You're a hero. Or, do you have an easier method for peeling them? I think using the chickpea water is great if you want a lighter-textured product than one with a lot of tahini or olive oil. I usually use 2 tbsp. of tahini for one can of peas - next time I'll dial it back and add more water instead. Do you find the water separates out though if you keep it in the fridge? Or does it not last that long?

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So, did you peel those two 15-ounce cans of chickpeas by hand? You're a hero. Or, do you have an easier method for peeling them? I think using the chickpea water is great if you want a lighter-textured product than one with a lot of tahini or olive oil. I usually use 2 tbsp. of tahini for one can of peas - next time I'll dial it back and add more water instead. Do you find the water separates out though if you keep it in the fridge? Or does it not last that long?

I did peel them by hand, but it was no big deal -- took 10 minutes max, and was fun to do while watching a little TV. I haven't found the water separated out, and its now 24 hours later... The other thing I meant to say earlier is that it definitely didn't take 10 minutes of blending! Maybe 3 minutes of active blending max (accompanied by stopping to stuff it down into the blender more, stir it up, etc.

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Yes, ten minutes seems crazy - I couldn't stand the sound for that long. Peeling chickpeas always takes me a crazy long time, but I usually do it while watching TV, too. Do you think you'll bother peeling them again?

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Ha! No, I meant the sound of a blender running for ten minutes. Although the chickpeas do make a nice soft squicking sound, followed by a ping as they hit the bowl when I peel them. Not really annoying, though.

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I wanted to come up with a slightly unusual hummus to put on my blog, and after some experimentation, I settled on this one, with roasted red peppers and kalamata olives. It's nice and smoky - and a nice change from regular hummus. Here is the recipe and photo!

Red Pepper and Olive Hummus

1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed

1 roasted red bell pepper (jarred is fine, but fresh roasted is even better)

1 T. extra virgin olive oil

2 T. tahini

3 T. lemon juice

8 pitted kalamata olives

1/2 t. salt

Pinch of cayenne pepper, optional

Pinch of smoked paprika, optional

Put all ingredients in a food processor and process until smooth. To serve, drizzle the top with olive oil and additional chopped kalamatas, if desired.

Optimized-hummus.jpg

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Humus is IMHO one of the foodstuffs that has the highest benefit of being made form scratch. Far less expensive than processed varieties, as well as having far better flavor.

I usually hydrate dry chickpeas overnight, then boil, in unsalted water, which I think gives a creamier end product when salted at the finish.

I second the roasted garlic, but there are endless riffs to the basic chickpea, tahini, live oil, salt and lemon base. Especially, drying out a little handful of lime leaves, then crushing them in a mortar prior to adding them is killer.

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Especially, drying out a little handful of lime leaves, then crushing them in a mortar prior to adding them is killer.

Can you elaborate on the type of lime leaf- is this just off a standard lime tree or ????? Thank you.

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  • 4 months later...
  • 1 year later...

Does anyone make hummus without a food processor or a blender? How was it made before electricity? My food processor packed it in and I am getting tired of buying the store's hummus.

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Mortar and pestle, I'd imagine, no? Sounds an awful lot like "work."

Yep. Mortar and pestle. It is a lot of work and you need a fairly non-porous mortar. I used to use one of the large Mason Cash mortars (until I broke it). However I used food processors for many years, now use the Thermomix.

This site shows using a potato masher.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Not sure if anyone else mentioned this, but I heard on a radio show (I think on NPR) the suggestion of adding a little pomegranate molasses (can be had from most Middle Eastern groceries) in hummus, and I really like it. It adds just a little sharpness to the flavor that we really enjoy.

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Does anyone make hummus without a food processor or a blender? How was it made before electricity? My food processor packed it in and I am getting tired of buying the store's hummus.

Before I had a food processor I used a potato masher with good luck. I used the kind where the business end is a plastic plate with circular holes in it. Not as easy as the food processor, but not that bad.

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