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adegiulio

Electrolux / Magic Mill Assistant mixer

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I was researching the Viking stand mixer when I came across this machine. Apparently it is made by Electrolux in Sweden and imported and sold here in America by a company called Magic Mill. It's got a 450 watt motor, but thats really all I can figure out from the various websites I looked at. While a number of websites sell this product, not very many really describe it well, including the Magic Mill Website.

So, who has one of these machines and can tell us about it. I have a Kitchenaid stand mixer and I am moderately happy with it. I will be using it predominantly for breadmaking.

Thanks for any input...


"It's better to burn out than to fade away"-Neil Young

"I think I hear a dingo eating your baby"-Bart Simpson

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I've had the AEG/Electrolux Assistant for several years and I love it.

Because of the way the drive powers the bowl movement, it does more with 450 watts than other mixers do with much higher wattage.

I particularly like the timer because I don't have to stand watching the machine while it runs.

It handles even very dense doughs - I burnt out a KA mixer while kneading some struan dough - this mixer works it easily.

I recommend this vendor Pleasant Hill grain. They include things in the base price that other vendors sell extra.

Note their notice that the factory in Sweden is being retooled and they will not have any mixers to ship until late June and I know for a fact that they already have several pre-orders because one of my local friends just ordered one and was given the option of cancelling her order or buying something else. She has used mine as a tryout and wants it because of the greater capacity.

I have a dough hook but rarely use it. I find the roller/scraper combination works dough more like hand kneading than other mixers and the dough, never, ever crawls up the beater, which used to annoy me no end with the KA.

I have recommended them many times over the years and the people who have gotten them have mostly always been quite happy with them. The way they work is different from other mixers and sometimes one needs to adjust how one works with them but once you get used to it you find it has a lot of advantages.

It is a lot easier to add ingredients with the machine running than with the KA.

I make quite a bit of Italian meringue and I have yet to burn myself with hot syrup using this machine - it happened many times with the KA.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I've had mine for about a year and love it. I got it because I make a lot of bread and my Kitchenaid couldn't handle it. I went through Pleasant Hill Grain and I can't say enough about how good they are to work with. I got the grinder, which I use for sausage making and it is 10 times better than that came with my Kitchenaid. When I had a problem figuring something out, Pleasant Hill was so great answering my questions. I also got the blender and use it often.

I expect to have to put it into my will as it gives all indications of outliving me!

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I also have one but I can't decide if I really like it or not. I have problems when making dough that it just seems to build up behind the roller and the scraper or when I'm using the hook it just kind of wraps around it and I constantly have to manually pull it off the hook to get any movement out of it. If I could solve thee problems I would be much more satisified with it.

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I've found that if you leave out part of the flour, making a real soft dough, then do most of your kneading, that the rollers work great. Then add the rest of the flour towards the end. I don't use the hook as the rollers work great when you do it this way. Does that make sense?

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For lots of info on the DLX and Bosch machines, check out the mixer-owners group on Yahoo. Pros, cons, ins and outs are discussed at great length, and participants are always eager to help. Susan

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I was researching the Viking stand mixer when I came across this machine. Apparently it is made by Electrolux in Sweden and imported and sold here in America by a company called Magic Mill. It's got a 450 watt motor, but thats really all I can figure out from the various websites I looked at. While a number of websites sell this product, not very many really describe it well, including the Magic Mill Website.

So, who has one of these machines and can tell us about it. I have a Kitchenaid stand mixer and I am moderately happy with it. I will be using it predominantly for breadmaking.

Thanks for any input...

I've had one for 6 years and love it for bread. I use primarily the hook which I have never had problems with. If kneading large amounts of dough it will climb the hook but its not difficult to push it down. I've used to to make the maximum it can hold and it worked very well. I highly recommed it for bread bakers. I haven't used it enough for cakes etc to comment. It does cream butter/suger well, however. Woods

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Thanks everyone for the replies. For those who have had the chance to compare with Kitchenaid, to you like it better, worse, or the same. Keep in mind I plan on using it predominantly for bread....

:smile:


"It's better to burn out than to fade away"-Neil Young

"I think I hear a dingo eating your baby"-Bart Simpson

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I also have one but I can't decide if I really like it or not. I have problems when making dough that it just seems to build up behind the roller and the scraper or when I'm using the hook it just kind of wraps around it and I constantly have to manually pull it off the hook to get any movement out of it. If I could solve thee problems I would be much more satisified with it.

When the dough is wrapped around the hook it is, in fact, moving. I first thought the same thing but have let it do its thing and the result is just fine. The kneading originates at the bottom and goes internally with occasional external motion. You can postion the hook and lock it to optimize the kneading action. I have made everything from pain de compaigne to brioche many many times with fine results. I have found the roller is better for very wet doughs. Bonne fortune.

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I got mine specifically for bread because I wanted something smaller than the old commercial Hobart I had been using and which I could no longer lift (after a back injury) I have a KA that I use for other things. I tried the Bosch which was being touted by King Arthur flour at the time and it walked off the counter while kneading a large batch and cracked two of my floor tiles.

I saw an article about the AEG (as it was then called in the US) in a magazine, may have been Sunset - and the writer said the capacity was greater than just the volume of the bowl seemed to be.

Good enough for me. I bought one and I love it.

I bake a lot of bread, not as much as I did, but still, more than most.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Well, it seems like everyone likes their machines. Just what I was afraid of, now I need to get a new toy!

Keep those comments coming...


"It's better to burn out than to fade away"-Neil Young

"I think I hear a dingo eating your baby"-Bart Simpson

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Although it is nearly twice the price, I would suggest looking at the Thermomix machine.....I've used these quite a bit and they are quite incredible.

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I bought a DLX four years ago after wrecking my thumbs kneading by hand for what was then a minil bread operation for our corner store. The learning curve was awful, after I put down $900 Cdn for the machine ... there's a couple of my anguished posts on the Yahoo mixer-owners site. I did persevere and used the DLX to make batches of six 2 lb loaves for about a year, until we bought a wholesale bread operation which came with a 20-qt no-name mixer, soon replaced by a 30-qt Hobart. I still use the DLX to do small batches of a couple of specialty breads ... Kamut, 100% rye and a fancy-dancy multigrain. I have also used it more than successfully for cakes, cookies, pumpkin pie fillings and so on. Do not be misled by the 450-watt designation and compare that to KA or the other planetary mixers. A DLX is like a spiral mixer, in that the bowl rotates, but the arm stays (more or less) stationary. It is a very heavy duty mixer and the 450 watts is more than enough. That all said ... if I had it to do over again, in my situation of being a micro commercial operation, with no longer time to have my assistant go through the DLX learning curve, I would have looked for a 12 qt Hobart ... but I repeat, that's based on my particular (peculiar???) situation. Susan

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