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DIY Taco Stand


Jason Perlow
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Mise En Place

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Leftover steak.

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Heat the steak thru with the onions, remove from pan, then toast up the tortillas in the pan. Stack them two by two on the serving plate.

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Put steak/onion mixture on tortilla stacks, hit with chopped cilantro, chopped chile (jalepeno, serrano or habenero) and thinly sliced pink radish (rabano). Squeeze lime juice and some of your favorite hot sauce on the tacos. Serve with cold lager-style beers and Mexican soda pop.

Edited by Jason Perlow (log)

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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You mean like this?-gallery_21237_2573_83620.jpg

The other night I made some with leftover chicken. I was going to post this one in the Dinner thread, but then thought twice about it. Perfect for this one, though. I accompanied them with one of these.

aka Michael

Chi mangia bene, vive bene!

"...And bring us the finest food you've got, stuffed with the second finest."

"Excellent, sir. Lobster stuffed with tacos."

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A favorite around here, too. In fact, such a favorite, I always grill way more steak than we can eat so we have a fast and easy dinner the next night. Best part of all, everyone can add just what they want!

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Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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These are soft tacos with two small corn tortillas steamed in a push-steamer, then filled with whatever meat you want: pollo, carnitas, al carbon, cabeza, lengua, al pastor, cesos (don't ask) etc. Never cheese, always cilantro and sauteed onions and a sauce (I always get the chile de arbol). In San Jose they are everyehere. The only tricks are: each meat has its own cooking base and herbs. Also to get the proper texture on the torillas, you need to quick-steam. They are usually 1.50 per pop. El Grullense its the local mega-copropation stand. I am also certain they exist all the way down the coast. As you noted, easy to make at home.

Edited by John S. (log)
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Greek Tacos?

Thinly sliced Lamb, heavily seasoned with Athena Greek seasoning.

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Lamb shown skewered with the rest of the ingredients. Cucumber yogurt sauce, onions tomatoes and G&T.

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Grecian flat bread is buttered and grilled with the meat.

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Assembled.

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Yumm..

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  • 8 months later...

Taco Tuesday at the Fahning household last night!

I used ground chuck (specially ground by my local supermarket guy; they will do anything if you bribe them with smoked butt and brisket), with lettuce, shredded cheese and some really great locally-made supermarket salsa -- oh and lots of torn cilantro and raw onion.

The difference this time is that Diana and I had a hankering for hardshells, not soft flour or corn tortillas, and I just flat refuse to do the cardboard El Paso hardshell route, so we made our own hardshells out of locally made corn tortillas.

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(despite picture quality, not burnt)

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These were shatteringly good, and I look forward to going these again with smoked meat or carnitas.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Susan, how did you make the hard taco shells? I make tacos alot but always use those old elpaso shells...time to take it to the next level. thanks, JP.

It was really quite easy. I heated a mess of oil in a 10" skillet (3/4 cup?) until it was hot enough to puff up a portion of one of the tacos that wasn't perfect. Then, I put in a tortilla. As quick as I could, I grabbed tongs and and turner (spatula) and stuf the spatula in the middle of the tortilla, and took the tongs to the other side and brought it up, so it was in "halves", but with almost 2" between what was in the oil and what was out of the oil. When the side in the oil was browned nd bubbley, I flipped the thing and did the other side, and then removed it a paper towel lined cookie sheet,

It was very easy, and next time I do it, I'll get a kid to photo the task. In fact, they were so good, we'll do it again soon!

These put El Paso to shame!

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Jason - Regarding tacos al pastor, theres this place in Kensington Market in dt Toronto that does amazing tacos al pastor, heavily seasoned pork fried with some pinapple topped with red onions and cilantro, lime and hot sauce to taste....sooooo good! Very authentic, as the owners/staff/cooks are all mexican, and some of the sweetest people ever.

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Thanks...what type of oil did you use and approx how long per side did you hold it in? I think I got the rest pretty well visualized.

I just used canola oil, because that was what I had. I can't remember the timing, but since the oil is in a skillet, it's easy to see when they are done. These were wonderful enough that the family wants them again soon.

Again, thanks for coming to the rescue!

Susan

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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