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Another wine question


sadistick
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I was recently given a bottle of 1982 Domaine de chevalier grand cru.

I dont know much about wine, but enjoy it tremendously. I have a few questions.

When should this wine be drank? Does it need more cellaring time?

If it is indeed time to drink it now, does it need to be decanted? Should it be opened before drinking?

What food would best pair with this wine?

If theres anything else I am missing, please let me know.

Thanks.

-Justin

Edited by sadistick (log)
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I've had a few 1982s recently. A very good year in Bordeaux and the ones I had were drinking beautifully now. It's not about to go bad or anything, but no reason to wait if you want to drink it now.

Decanting is up to you but I would definitely open the bottle a couple hours before drinking it. I always pour a little bit to try when I first open one, it's fun to taste the changes as it opens up.

As for food, I'd go with classic simple red wine stuff. Roast beef, steaks or lamb simply prepared, roasted potatoes and root vegetables, steamed asparagus.

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Thanks DT!

I am always hesitant whether to decant wines or not, I know that most younger reds benefit from it, but am clueless when it comes to older vintages.

Did you decant the '82s you had?

I was thinking the typical red meat, but was just curious what would go BEST, I guess that comes down to personal preference though.

Cheers.

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For a bottle that old decanting in front of a candle or some light is a good idea as it will probably have a fair amount of sediment. Better to leave it in the bottle and not the glass.

Enjoy a wine from a great year! I'd pair it with lamb or duck.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

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Did you decant the '82s you had?

No. My recently departed father in law had (his wife still has) a nice stash of 1982 Pichon Longueville, like 3 cases. This is some of the best wine I've ever had.

Interestingly, I saw a thing in the newspaper about the 82 Pichon Longueville. The writer said he'd had two bottles of it. One was fantastic and the other was just OK. I've had the same experience with my father in law's wine. The good ones are over the top fabulous and another bottle from the same batch might be just pretty good.

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The 1982 Domaine de Chevalier Graves was famous for its inconsistency. Some bottles are heavenly, most are ordinary.

I'd decant for sediment but I wouldn't let it sit long as at that age it could break down very quickly.

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The 1982 Domaine de Chevalier Graves was famous for its inconsistency.  Some bottles are heavenly, most are ordinary. 

I'd decant for sediment but I wouldn't let it sit long as at that age it could break down very quickly.

I had this wine several times from about 1986 to 1998 or so.

It is very inconsistent.

ranging from poor to good.

Hopefully you have one of the better bottles.

I would simply stand the bottle upright for a few hours before serving.

The sediment will fall to the bottom of the bottle and a little care

in pouring will prevent any problems.

There is no need to decant. (there is certainly no problem if you choose to decant it either)

Also I would say there is no possibility of the wine "breaking down."

Twenty four years for a well stored Bordeaux is not an undue amount of age.

If the wine is a poor example--decanting will have little or no impact on the wine one way

or the other.

Edited by JohnL (log)
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Thanks for the responses guys - I am planning on opening this one, and another (a client just dropped off a '82 Lynch Bages over the weekend) during a special dinner party.

I was wondering, I am planning on serving a variety of food pairings to see which go well, 2 decided upon, a NY Strip steak seared and sliced thin, duck breast (should I make a sauce? If so, what type...I was told no sweet sauces) and maybe some cheese...However that is where I am stuck, what type of cheeses would go well with Bordeaux's?

For Veg, I was thinking some roasted fingerling potatoes and maybe some root veggies.

Cheers.

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Thanks for the responses guys - I am planning on opening this one, and another (a client just dropped off a '82 Lynch Bages over the weekend) during a special dinner party.

I was wondering, I am planning on serving a variety of food pairings to see which go well, 2 decided upon, a NY Strip steak seared and sliced thin, duck breast (should I make a sauce?  If so, what type...I was told no sweet sauces) and maybe some cheese...However that is where I am stuck, what type of cheeses would go well with Bordeaux's?

For Veg, I was thinking some roasted fingerling potatoes and maybe some root veggies.

Cheers.

The 82 Lynch is a wonderful wine--you may also get lucky with the Domaine de Chevalier.

food sounds fine--- steak and duck.

A simple sauce would be ok for the duck--sweet is ok just not too sweet--maybe a red wine reduction with a touch of thyme would work best. Most anything with mushrooms would be good too.

I love root veggies with red wines--good choice!

As for cheese?

Controversial. I personally (as well as many others) would not serve cheeses with red wine--especially mature Bordeaux. The fats in cheese dull the palate to the wine.

If you must--go with a dry cheese like a nice parmesan.

I would have the wines with the main courses and then have some port with cheese after dinner.

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hmmm, maybe a seared duck breast with a chantrelle ragou...

Interesting what you mentioned regarding the cheeses, John, I guess I will save them for some fonseca to be opened later this year.

Anything else I am missing which you believe is a must have pairing with a nice bordeaux? Would you decant the Lynch?

Cheers.

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hmmm, maybe a seared duck breast with a chantrelle ragou...

Interesting what you mentioned regarding the cheeses, John, I guess I will save them for some fonseca to be opened later this year.

Anything else I am missing which you believe is a must have pairing with a nice bordeaux?  Would you decant the Lynch?

Cheers.

At some point you should try red wines with cheeses and see for yourself--as I noted there are a lot of proponents of red wines and cheeses as a pairing.

Fonseca--yes that is a good idea!!! :wink:

I am also not one for decanting--for mature wines I just stand em up for several hours and pour carefully--the sediment should stay in the bottom of the bottle.

The Lynch is drinking beautifully right now.

Sounds like you are set for a great dinner!!!

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