Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cooking with "Tapas" by Jose Andres


Recommended Posts

Well, it looks like chorizo has got its fair share of attention in this thread. A few days ago, Rogelio and I met at my place to cook the potatoes Rioja-style from Tapas. Ok, Rogelio was the chef and I just a poor stager.

Anyway, this recipe is very simple and it’s a good example of how certain Spanish preparations achieve impressive results with a handful of common products. You just need olive oil –should I add extra-virgin?--, garlic, onion, potatoes –we couldn’t get Idaho potatoes as specified in the recipe :wink:--, pimentón, salt and, of course, chorizo.

gallery_10675_0_58336.jpg

The bottle of Ostatu Reserva 1999 is not required though it’s advisable to get one if possible.

To make things more interesting we had two types of chorizo -- one smoked, which you can see in the front, and another non-smoked, behind the garlic.

As you have already guessed, the first step it to chop the ingredients. The only trick here is that the potatoes shouldn’t be sliced all the way through. You have to partly cut them, and then break them to allow a larger release of starch:

gallery_10675_0_75647.jpg

gallery_10675_0_31973.jpg

gallery_10675_0_75647.jpg

Then in low heat, you have to cook in olive oil the garlic until it gets golden and add the onion later until it's brown -- or as chef Abraham García says, they lose all sense of shame (pierdan la vergüenza):

gallery_10675_0_65548.jpg

gallery_10675_0_22884.jpg

gallery_10675_0_31706.jpg

The goal here is to get caramelized onion. One of the puzzling things of the book is that the time to get the onions to the caramelization point varies from recipe to recipe.

Once you reach that point, you add the chorizo to fry it until it’s browned too, let’s say a couple of minutes:

gallery_10675_0_124556.jpg

gallery_10675_0_102135.jpg

gallery_10675_0_74590.jpg

gallery_10675_0_56295.jpg

Notice the different color of the first two pics and the last two. The former are non-smoked and the latter, which are darker, are smoked chorizo.

Now, we have to add the potatoes ant let them cook around ten minutes or so:

gallery_10675_0_96315.jpg

gallery_10675_0_6977.jpg

gallery_10675_0_55716.jpg

gallery_10675_0_66012.jpg

Now, the final step. Add pimentón, salt and water enough to cover all the ingredients, bring to a boil and let it reduce at least by half:

gallery_10675_0_42559.jpg

gallery_10675_0_18519.jpg

We decided to add a couple of bay leaves:

gallery_10675_0_57421.jpg

gallery_10675_0_11868.jpg

gallery_10675_0_9618.jpg

Serve and eat:

gallery_10675_0_84364.jpg

This is where the bottle of Ostatu --to begin with-- comes in handy.

PedroEspinosa (aka pedro)

Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the oil you used, Pedro?

I use the Goya EVOO widely available here in the US--it's Spanish, easily accessible, affordable, and--oh yeah--delicious. I'm sure there are better oils available in US markets, and I'm curious about your choices in Spain. Olive oil is obviously essential to many of the recipes in the cookbook.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I love Spanish olive oils, but as long as good oils are used I think one will still get great results with non-Spanish olive oils. They may make the final dish taste slightly different, but can anyone really say that good Italian oils, for example, wouldn't work? I like to have good Spanish oils in my pantry, but I wouldn't not make any of these dishes if I didn't have any.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to post
Share on other sites

We used a blend of 50% arbequina, 40% hojiblanca and 10% picual bottled by Abraham García (Viridiana chef and owner). It's very fruity thanks to the arbequina variety whose trend to quickly oxidized is counter-balanced with the other two, hojiblanca given the backbone to the oil and picual some nice acidity

Albeit, I don't think that oil, as long as it's a good quality, plays a determinant role in this dish. It'd be a completely story were we talking of gazpacho, for instance.

PedroEspinosa (aka pedro)

Link to post
Share on other sites

pedro--thanks for the pictorial---these look like they would make a fabulous sunday breakfast! how long, approximately, would you say it took to simmer the potatoes and chorizo once the liquid was added? thanks! (i may do it tonight, and make extra for tomorrow's breakfast--with a few eggs fresh from the coop, it sounds like heaven!)

"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

Link to post
Share on other sites
Albeit, I don't think that oil, as long as it's a good quality, plays a determinant role in this dish. It'd be a completely story were we talking of gazpacho, for instance.

Somehow, it had not occurred to me that gazpacho would require superior EVOO. Why is that? Not that I use crap olive oil in mine (I don't ever buy crap olive oil), but I think of the vinegar and vegetables as the important components of the gazpacho--not the oil.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Albeit, I don't think that oil, as long as it's a good quality, plays a determinant role in this dish. It'd be a completely story were we talking of gazpacho, for instance.

Somehow, it had not occurred to me that gazpacho would require superior EVOO. Why is that? Not that I use crap olive oil in mine (I don't ever buy crap olive oil), but I think of the vinegar and vegetables as the important components of the gazpacho--not the oil.

Superior oil makes all the difference with a good gazpacho so long as all the other ingredients are superior as well. While top-flight Spanish oil is as good as any, I have made and eaten great gazpachos made with other oils as well. While the final flavor may be subtly different it remains delicious.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
I think that part of the confusion in the US about Spanish chorizo is due to the fact that, as far as I know, only one brand of chorizo is allowed into the country from Spain. That's Palacios brand, which comes in regular and hot versions. There are, however, at least a couple of producers in the US that market Spanish-style sausage of a variety of types, and all I have had have been good, though I assume still different than the real article.

The Palacios brand may be more available in some parts of the US than others. Here in Dallas it is sold in most main stream grocery stores, as well as specialty markets. I always keep a couple of rings hanging in the kitchen.

Cantimpalos is my favorite. I wish it were available in the US!

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not really surprised that therre are so many different styles, although I am surprised that the styles are so widely divergent. In the US at least I think it is fair to say that "Spanish-style chorizo" means a cured chorizo, while "Mexican-style" means a fresh pork sausage. Of course, that is not to say that all "mexican chorizo" is all of the same style or flavoring either.

It's also about the spicing, the flavor.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For part of a dinner tonight, I made the gambas al ajillo--garlic shrimp. This is such a simple recipe, I think it should be a part of everybody's repertoire. It's fast and doesn't heat up the kitchen, too, which is more than I can say for the other things I cooked tonight. (Heh.) My favorite aspect of this recipe is the use of brandy--until I got this cookbook it never occurred to me to add some brandy to my garlic shrimp. It adds a certain depth of flavor and I prefer it to the acidity of white wine, which I used to add to my garlic shrimp before seeing the light.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Been wanting to try Fabada for a while now. Finally got hold of the vital granja beans and some good-quality chorizo and morcilla and set to work - ie, stuck it in a pot and did very little else beyond make some bread to mop up the juices.

gallery_16895_2915_79118.jpg

It's not the prettiest dish, but by god it was one of the best tasting things I've ever made. Or eaten. The way little more than three types of pork and some beans transform into something so good really seems to sum up what cooking is all about. Even if my eating several bowlfuls didn't exactly sum up the spirit of tapas.

restaurant, private catering, consultancy
feast for the senses / blog

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Recently came across the book, from which I made:

Squid with Caramelized Onions (pg 146) - simple, yet soo delicious

gallery_21049_162_73776.jpg

great on a slice of toasted bagget

gallery_21049_162_87158.jpg

Rack of Lamb with Honey Allioli (pg 244) - sprinkled with Fennel Fleur de Sel. Mixing the allioli with honey produces a great sauce with can be used on meats or sandwiches

gallery_21049_162_41167.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Percy, what kind of onions did you use for the squid dish? Did you buy the squid in a special seafood market or a regular supermarket?

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to post
Share on other sites
Next up on my list was...

Fried Egg with Chorizo and Potatoes (pg 171)

gallery_21049_162_46437.jpg

Yolk ... Yummm....

gallery_21049_162_57145.jpg

I did not use a cup of olive oil to fry the egg as suggested. Instead, I used the left over oil from the garlic, potatoes and chorizo. Turned out great !!

Ah, butif you use that cup of olive oil you get the Spanish texture to the egg! The crisp edges and runny yolk... Joy on a plate!

Link to post
Share on other sites

It would appear that he did get the crisp whites and runny yolk. That is my favorite way of eating fried eggs. That texture can be had with any number of different cooking fats. I usually use butter, but my favorite is with duck fat. Where the olive oil or other fat choice makes a difference is with flavor rather than texture, IMO.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to post
Share on other sites

The egg had a crisp edge and runny yolk. One could argue that a cup of olive oil would have yeilded crispier edges, but this was enjoyable nonetheless.

Doc, my favorite way to make fried eggs is with some duck fat too, but I have been trying to avoid it based on my "other" Dr's advice.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A trick to get puntillas --crispy edges-- in the fried egg is to separate the yolk from the whites and cook the whites first, until you get the crispness you want, and add the yolk then for just a few seconds.

PedroEspinosa (aka pedro)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Seeing this thread again has me excited as I am on the way to the store to buy the ingredients for my dinner tonight - a "non-traditional" steak dinner - all with recipes from the book (except the salad).

Frisee au lardons with chorizo replacing the lardons and sherry vinaigrette (my own creation)

Gazpacho

Route 11 Tortilla

Slow roasted tenderloin with Cabrales

Toasted bread with chocolate, olive oil and sea salt

Pictures tonight.

Edited by bilrus (log)

Bill Russell

Link to post
Share on other sites
A trick to get puntillas --crispy edges-- in the fried egg is to separate the yolk from the whites and cook the whites first, until you get the crispness you want, and add the yolk then for just a few seconds.

The way I do it is to fry the egg on high heat in the fat of one's choice and cover the pan while it is cooking. The bottom white gets fried crisp, while the top white steams. Unless cooked too long the yolk remains nice and runny. By the way, Percy, your egg looks perfect. I'm not sure duck fat is any worse than any other fat healthwise.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are the results of my non-traditional steak dinner:

Frisee au lardons with chorizo replacing the lardons and sherry vinaigrette:

gallery_7851_3425_11798.jpg

Gazpacho:

gallery_7851_3425_3582.jpg

gallery_7851_3425_1024.jpg

Route 11 Tortilla:

gallery_7851_3425_4270.jpg

Slow roasted tenderloin with Cabrales:

gallery_7851_3425_2827.jpg

gallery_7851_3425_2263.jpg

Even barkrus the dog enjoyed a bite of the beef with his kibble:

gallery_7851_3425_8777.jpg

Toasted bread with chocolate, olive oil and sea salt:

gallery_7851_3425_3702.jpg

Edited by bilrus (log)

Bill Russell

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By PedroG
      Utilization of meat leftovers from sous-vide cooking
      Sometimes when you buy a nice cut of meat, your eyes are bigger than your and your beloved's stomach. So what to do with the leftovers?
      In Tyrolia (Austria) they make a "Gröstl", in Solothurn (Switzerland) they make a "Gnusch", in the Seftigenamt (a region in the Swiss canton Berne) they make a "Gmüder", and we (Pedro and SWAMBO) make a varying concoct using ideas from all of the three. We call it "Gröstl", but it is not necessarily a typical Tyrolean Gröstl, and it is different each time, and we usually do not top it with a fried egg as they do in Austria.
      Ingredients

      All your meat leftovers
      Onion (compulsory)
      Any hard vegetable (we prefer celery stalks, or zucchini)
      Any salad (iceberg lettuce or endive/chicory or any other salad leaves, may contain carrot julienne)
      Fried potatoes, or alternatively sweetcorn kernels
      Sherry or wine or bouillon or the gravy you preserved from your last LTLT.cooked meat for simmering (I usually prefer Sherry)
      Eventually some cream (or crème fraîche)
      Salt, pepper, parsley, caraway seeds (typical for Tyrolean Gröstl), paprika, condiment (in Switzerland we use "Aromat" by Knorr, which contains sodium chloride, sodium glutamate, lactose, starch, yeast extract, vegetable fats, onions, spices, E552)'
      vegetable oil (I prefer olive oil)




      Mise en place

      cut your meat in small cubes or slices
      cut the onion(s) not too fine (place the first cut below your tongue to avoid tearing during cutting)
      cut the vegetables about 3-4 mm thick
      cut the salads to pieces smaller than 4 cm, distribute on the cutting board and season deliberately
      cut the potatoes to 1 cm cubes
      place 3 heavy skillets with ample oil on the stove

      Cooking

      in skillet 1, stir-fry the onions, add the hard vegetables still stir-frying, add salad, add sufficient liquid (Sherry or wine or bouillon or gravy) for simmering under a cover until soft. If desired, reduce heat and add some cream at the end.
      in skillet 2, stir-fry the potatoes until soft (in case of sweetcorn kernels, add to skillet 1 after stir-frying and use skillet 2 for skillet 3)
      in skillet 3, as soon as the vegetables and the potatoes are soft, sear the meat in just smoking oil for 30-60 seconds, then add to skillet 1

      Serving
      You may mix the potatoes with the vegetables and meat to make a rather typical Gröstl, or serve the fried potatoes separately; we prefer the latter, as the potatoes stay more crunchy.
      Do not forget to serve a glass of good dry red wine!
    • By PedroG
      Brisket „Stroganoff“ Sous Vide With Mixed Mushrooms

      Ingredients for 2 servings
      about 400g well marbled Brisket
      3 tablespoons rice bran oil or other high smoke point oil (grapeseed oil)
      3 tablespoons extravirgin olive oil
      3 tablespoons Cognac (brandy)
      2 small onions, finely diced
      ½ yellow or red bell peppers cut into strips
      90 g mixed mushrooms
      100 ml of gravy from last Brisket (or concentrated stock)
      1 teaspoon mustard, Dijon type
      1 teaspoon paprika mild (not spicy!)
      1 medium pickled cucumber cut into thin strips
      2 tablespoons parsley, finely chopped
      approx. 120g sour cream with herbs
      Sous Vide - cooking
      Marinate brisket with Mexican style (medium hot) marinade in the vacuum bag for at least 3 days at 1 ° C, cook sous vide 48 hours at 55.0 ° C.
      Preparing the sauce
      At a moderate heat sauté onions in olive oil, add peppers (preblanched in the microwave oven for 2-3 minutes) and mushroom mixture, stir-fry, remove from heat and add the gravy. Add pickled cucumber, pepper, mustard and cognac. Put on very low heat, add sour cream and keep warm, but do not boil as the cream will separate. Remove the brisket from the bag, cut into strips (about 8x10x35mm), sear very quickly in smoking-hot rice bran oil, add the meat and the parsley to the sauce.
      Serving
      Serve on warmed plates. Typically served with spätzle (south German) or chnöpfli (Swiss).
      And don't forget a glass of good red wine!
      Enjoy your meal!
      Pedro

    • By PedroG
      Olla podrida sous vide
      Origin
      Not rotten pot, but mighty or rich pot! Originated in 16th century Spain, olla poderida became olla podrida and was falsely translated into French as pot-pourri.
      Ingredients
      For two servings
      * 100g Brisket well marbled, cooked SV 48h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Pork meat well marbled, cooked SV 24h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Lamb chops without bone, cooked SV 4h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chicken breast, cooked SV 2h/58°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chorizo, sliced approximately 4mm †
      * 125g Chickpeas (garbanzos), soaked overnight in water †
      * 1 Onion chopped medium-fine †
      * ½ Savoy cabbage approx. 200g cut into pieces, thick leaf veins removed
      * ½ Celeriac approx. 200g quartered, sliced about 2mm
      * 2 Carrots sliced approximately 120g about 3mm
      * 1 Leek approximately 20cm / 100g sliced about 5mm
      * Extra virgin olive oil
      * Rice bran oil
      * Dried parsley qs, aromatic, black pepper
      † Beef, pork, lamb and chicken (or at least two kinds of meat) as well as chorizo, chickpeas and onions are mandatory ingredients, other vegetables vary according to desire and availability.
      Cooking
      Boil chickpeas in water for 30-60 min.
      Sauté onions in olive oil, add chorizo, continue sautéing, add chickpeas including its cooking water, add remaining vegetables, cover and cook to the desired softness, stir from time to time. If additional liquid is needed, you may add Sherry instead of water.
      Reduce heat. Season to taste. Add parsley.
      In a heavy skillet, sear the meat dice in just smoking hot rice bran oil (very high smoking point allows very quick sear, not overdoing the center of the meat).
      Sear one kind of meat at a time and transfer to the pan with the vegetables.
    • By Chef Hermes Blog
      Warm Onion Bavarois
      * 300g Sweet Onion purée
      * 250g Whole milk
      * 150g Whipping cream
      * 150g Chicken stock (or fresh vegetable nage, not stock cubes)
      * 3.5g Gellan gum
      * Seasoning
      Lightly grease with vegetable oil the moulds you intend to use (darioles, ramekins etc) and set to one side.
      In a pan (but not on the heat), whisk together all the ingredients.
      Place on a medium heat and whisk continuously, the mix will start to thicken slightly. Carry on whisking for a further 3-4 minutes when it has started to bubble. Then quickly pour into the greased moulds & chill.
      To reheat for serving, just place the ramekin in a pan of water and simmer gently for 8-10 mins.
    • By swpeterson
      I have been buying country style bone-in ribs instead of bone-in pork chops. I season them with a rub very similar to Emeril's Rustic Rub spice rub and use a heaping tablespoon a rendered Nueskie's Applewood smoked bacon fat in the Food Saver vacumn bag. We have been using 2 ribs in the bag but have made the decision to switch to one to split. The meat is so rich and flavorful that we can easily split one and enjoy the meal even more.
      For a sauce, I cobbled together a sauce made with the juice of half a valencia orange, the pulp from 1 passion fruit, 1 cup pitted cherries (I used rainiers and bings in this one), 1 tsp Dijon mustard, 1/2 cup white wine, juice from 1 lime, 2 tsp honey, garlic cloves crushed (I used roasted garlic that I keep in the fridge and 'crushed' them in my 'special' coffee grinder(2)) and 1 medium sized shallot. I used the same bacon fat to soften the shallots, then added the rest of the ingredients and let it reduce by about a third and then let it rest and reheated it when the pork ribs were done.
      I kept them in the sous vide at 141 from 10:00 AM until I got home from work at 7:00. It took another half hour +/- to change clothes, pour a glass of wine, reheat the sauce, make a salad, and heat up the garlic bread that I keep prepped in the freezer. After the bread was heated for about 8 minutes, I switched the oven to broil and took the bread out of the oven.
      I have started to experiment with using the broiler element to put color on the proteins that I have cooked in the sous vide. I have placed the oven rack on the third rack from the top, leave the door ajar while I bring the broiler element up to heat. I use my 10" stainless steel saute pan with a stainless steel rack in the pan for the protein. I open the sous vide package and pour the liquid that has accumulated in the bag into the bottom of the pan. I put the ribs, fattest side up on the rack and place the pan in the oven. I leave the door ajar and let them stay in there for 8 mnutes.
      That timing has worked extremely well for both the ribs and the chicken that I have done. I don't flip them yet and that hasn't been necessary for those 2 proteins. (I was much less successful with this formula for the flank steak which I think needs to be closer the heat source for less time).
      At any rate, the broiler is working well for color and the meat and sauce are great. The sauce also works very well with chicken. Haven't tried it yet with the salmon.
      Just wanted to share as I really love this sous vide thing and wanted to share.
      Sorry no photos yet. I haven't figured that part out yet but my husband promises to teach me.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...