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ludja

Chimichurri Sauce

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I guess I was living under a rock, because I had never had chimichurri sauce, that wonderful herby salsa of South America. I also noticed that there wasn't an Egullet topic devoted to chimichurri...so...

I remedied my own deficiency last week with a friend. We grilled up some great steaks and had them with a parsley-oregano chimichuirri sauce. I made a simple pilaf and some buttered green beans to serve alongside. It was an incredibly satisfying meal; one that I can see repeating all summer long.

Here's the recipe that we used:

1 bunch Italian flat-leaf parsley

2 Tbs finely minced fresh oregano

1 shallot, minced

1 clove garlic, minced

½ tsp salt

1 tsp crushed red pepper

1 ½ tsp red wine vinegar

1 Tbs lemon juice

~ ¼ cup olive oil

Any other favorite variations or uses? I'm particularly interested in people's experiences combining chimichurri with seafood.

What about wine pairings? We had a bold Cabernet Sauvignon which actually went quite well with the meal, in spite of?, the strong chimichurri flavors.


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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A fresh diced serrano pepper or jalapeno works well to give it some real kick. I have also used cilantro along with the parsley.

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Here is my recipe - being Argentine i must highlight that ours is the original version....similar to the dulce de leche debate.

* Quantities in proportion

Dry

45 Fresh parsley

15 Orégano

20 Fresh garlic

13 Sweet Páprika

4 Thyme

2 Hot páprika or cayenne

1 Salt & Pepper

Wet

45 Olive oil

30 Red wine vinegar

25 Warm water

Optional ingredients - not for me though:

Pepper – finely chopped

Spring onion - finely chopped

Red wine

Preparing the Chimichurri:

Finely chop the parsley and garlic. Combine all the ingredients and let it rest for at least for a few hours before eating - preferably a day or two.

-che

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There are 3 chimichurris in June's Food and Wine - traditional, sweet paprika, and spicy. They sound interesting...


Burgundy makes you think silly things, Bordeaux makes you talk about them, and Champagne makes you do them ---

Brillat-Savarin

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Here is my recipe - being Argentine i must highlight that ours is the original version....similar to the dulce de leche debate.

...-che

Thanks, CheGevera! Nice to see an Argentinian's recipe!

I did refer to it as a "South American" dish in the first post because I wasn't sure about it's exact roots or the different variations in different countries of South America. For instance, I think I've seen or heard that in Chile the tendency is to include cilantro? :unsure:

I guess beef is king in Argentina, but is chimichurri commonly served with other meats or seafood in Argentina as well?

Also, is it usually used just as a condiment or else also as a marinade before cooking/grilling?


Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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There are 3 chimichurris in June's Food and Wine -  traditional, sweet paprika, and spicy.  They sound interesting...

Thanks, I checked them out. I liked one of the serving ideas they gave for an Argentinian, "parillada" or mixed grill. The combination they suggest sounds good: chorizo, chicken, chicken livers and skirt steak.

Also, the sweet paprika version with just olive oil, paprika, garlic, lemon, s&p sounds interesting.

Thanks for pointing out the 'nouveau" green onion-ginger chimichurri as well, bilrus. That sounds like it would also be great with shrimp or fish.


Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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A fresh diced serrano pepper or jalapeno works well to give it some real kick.  I have also used cilantro along with the parsley.

This is a great variation as well as it would have a completely different flavor.

I was wondering if I should keep the oregano in with the cilantro version?

Too many competing flavors?


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Nice photo...

We had the sauce with a more strongly flavored NY strip and thought that they complemented each other well, but I can appreciate that it would overpower a more delicate cut like a filet. The F&W article mentioned skirt steak which is also often paired with stronger sauces/flavors.


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I like to add minced pickled jalepenos for heat. I like the flavor & heat of the peppers but the vinegary pickling juice adds a nice tang as well.

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Thanks, CheGevera!  Nice to see an Argentinian's recipe!

I did refer to it as a "South American" dish in the first post because I wasn't sure about it's exact roots or the different variations in different countries of South America.  For instance, I think I've seen or heard that in Chile the tendency is to include cilantro?  :unsure:

I guess beef is king in Argentina, but is chimichurri commonly served with other meats or seafood in Argentina as well? 

Also, is it usually used just as a condiment or else also as a marinade before cooking/grilling?

of all the different cuts of beef and offal we eat, chimichurri is only used with chorizos (sausages). certainly don't go using it on a nice piece of meat. in argentina the quality - especially the flavour - of the beef is so good we never put anyting other than salt on it.

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"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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CheGuevara's recipe is good but by all means not the original and the only one either. there are many recipes these days . One thing though, oregano and paprika in Argentina are kind of different taste to the rest of the world although I have found Macedonian republic's coarse crushed dried mild paprika of surprisingly identical quality and taste perhaps Serbians and Hungarians have it too and Greek oregano or rigani very similar to the Argentinian oregano.

Sorry but Ann was taken for a ride the above pic and recipe has noyjing to do with typical Argentinian chimichanga.


Edited by piazzola (log)

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As my name would suggest, I am also Argentine. I will give you 2 recipes, one is my mom's and another is one prepared by a pretty famous chef in Argentina called Narda Lepes. As Che says, in Argentina they are used mostly in chorizo sandwiches which usually are served as appetizers to a big asado.

Chef's Chimichurri:

Dried mint : 3 tblsp

Lemon juice: 1/4 Cup

Sweet paprika: 3 tblsp

Olive Oil: 1 Cup

Dried oregano: 3 tblsp

Dried rosemary: 3 tblsp.

Crushed black pepper: 1 tblsp

Salt: 1 cda.

Crushed red pepper: 2 tblsp

Coarse salt: 2 tblsp

Dried garlic : 3 tblsp

Cumin: 1 tsp

Turmeric: 2 tblsp

Mom's:

Dice (very finely) 1 or 2 white onions, 3 garlic

cloves and 1 red or green bell pepper.

Cover diced vegetables with olive or sunflower oil,

oil should surpass vegetables by about 2 centimeters.

Then add a decent amount of red wine vinegar.

Add a good amount of dry oregano, a teaspoon of sweet

paprika and quite a lot of ground pepper. You can add

some diced fresh parsely and add salt and pepper to

taste.

That's basically it. Some people in Argentina do it

all with dried spices, dried parsley, dried oregano,

garlic, paprika, crushed red pepper - all hydrated

with a mix of olive oil, salt and pepper. But I've

always liked the fresher version better.

Enjoy!

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I've always liked this Green Onion-Ginger Chimichurri from Cooking Light.  Gives it a little Asian feel.

Not quite!

There is another chimichurri called "salsa criolla" which does incorporate lots of chopped green onions.

@argentinadave

Yes, dry herbs version may be for people that do not have gardens. I use fresh produce is far better.

Basic chimichurri is salt, pepper,parsley,garlic, lemon juice and oil. Add some type of other Mediterranean type of herbs,use various types of vinegar alternatively and you got a tremendous variations in flavours. It's all about combination and permutations.

Surely it is hard for someone who does not know what kind of flavours he/she should be looking for.

There are Southern chimichurries based almost on crushed chilles and very hot very red yet the flavours is what Argentines are looking for cannot be easily described.

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