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'Ember' roasted steaks...


phlawless
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A few years ago I worked an event in Hawai'i that George Germon and Johanne Killeen from Al Forno attended. They had this method of roasting a beef steak in the embers of the fire. I don't know what cut, or the details of how they did this (I was working for another restaurant, only tasted the result) but I really want to try this out. It was incredible!

Anybody familiar with this?

"Godspeed all the bakers at dawn... may they all cut their thumbs and bleed into their buns til they melt away..."

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I was talking with a friend this week who is a popular food guy on tv....anyway, he had told me about how he cooks tri tip and steaks directly on the hot coals after blowing them clean with a blow dryer...I thought it was strange but he swears its an awesome method....I am too scared to try it for fear of ruining a nice steak....I think the key is the right wood used in the heating...

Moo, Cluck, Oink.....they all taste good!

The Hungry Detective

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I remember seeing this in a Julia Child Master Chef episode. I think they call it "Dirty Steak" and serve with "Fanny Sauce".

I found a link with a video clip to that episode: click and it is most likely in the accompanying book as well.

I've seen a cookbook from Al Forno, "Cucina Simpatica"; there may also be a recipe in there.

It would be interesting to hear if anyone's experience with it though. The only thing I've cooked directly on coals is shucked corn on the cob.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Alton Brown did a show where he cooked flank steak (I believe?) in glowing hardwood coals. He used a blowdryer to blow away any ash and then layed the steak right on the coals.

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so I watched the julia video, and it turned out to be george and johanne's recipe. Here's the thing...he didn't season the meat before putting it on the coals. WTF? I remember the meat being very well seasoned, not tasting flat at all...

"Godspeed all the bakers at dawn... may they all cut their thumbs and bleed into their buns til they melt away..."

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Using a blow dryer before setting meat on embers is a good idea.

Oiling the Steaks well prior to placing upon the hot coals will offer a barrier toward sticking. Brush some oil on lightly before turning every time. It should sear off and not effect the finished taste.

Regarding seasonings it best to always use less when cooking at high heats. Pepper either ground, cracked or very fine will enhance as it works okay under searing temperatures. All salt will accomplish is drawing some blood, fluids and moisture out of your meat after placing on embers.

If you prefer adding seasoning it can be done during the period your steaks are setting prior to being served to enhance the meat. A light application immediately before placing on the embers of MSG will prevent sticking to embers and enhance the beef flavors while burning off during the cooking process.

Keep in mind that baking potatoes under the embers is a well known campfire treat that will compliment your entrees.

Turning the beef often allows the heat to cook your steaks evenly. It easy to check the temperature with a probe thermometer, keep in mind that you should allow the steaks additional cooking time after being removed from embers as the temperature often rises about 10 % depending on the steaks thickness.

Always watch the steaks as embers often are very hot and may cook very quickly.

Irwin

I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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Wow didnt know it was on a good eats episode...I thought I was getting some good "secret knowledge" oh well....I am still to chicken to try it and ruin a good steak...maybe I can try it with a cheap steak first that way it wont cost me that much to "fry" a few in the process...

Moo, Cluck, Oink.....they all taste good!

The Hungry Detective

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We used to do this in the boy scouts when I was a kid. We called it cowboy steaks. Instead of embers we'd heat a large stone right in the middle of the ashes and use that as the cooking surface. Salt and pepper when done and you had some happy campers.

Bryan C. Andregg

"Give us an old, black man singing the blues and some beer. I'll provide the BBQ."

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'Dirty Steak' works for thin steaks, because it briefly sears the outside and cooks the meat internally. don't try it with a thick t-bone or filet mignon or you will end up with a burnt crust by the time the center is done enough. -Dick

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