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Cab Franc?


kcd
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Ladies and Gents

I'll be hosting some friends for an exploration into Cab Franc. A couple of years ago I got some interesting Cab Francs while touring B.C. Now I'm in Austin, and want to try 2 or 3 new ones.

Any ideas about specifics?

Also, I'm open to ideas about foods. Real open. I was thinking about some grilled lamb "stuffed" with fresh herbed pesto...??? Cheeses? General directions?

Facts and opinions equally welcome.

kc

" Time and trouble will tame an advanced young woman, but an advanced old woman is uncontrollable by any earthly force."--Dorothy L. Sayers.

As someone who just turned 50, I look forward to this state-of-being.

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I'd suggest getting one classic example of Chinon from the Loire, one example from Bordeaux (Chateau Cheval Blanc if you're feeling flush) and a couple of New World choices. For domestic wines there's great Cab Franc from Long Island or California. For other New World choices you might find some from Argentina or Australia or New Zealand.

This could be a very interesting side by side compare-and-contrast excercise.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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A small winery "Lang & Reed" makes some enjoyable cab francs. Check them out here..

No idea if they're available retail in your area, but worth a look!

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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What a great start. Between Central Market; Grapevine Market, and Whole Foods, we have a lot of good choices for wines. Living in the very near vacinity of all three really helps! :biggrin:

" Time and trouble will tame an advanced young woman, but an advanced old woman is uncontrollable by any earthly force."--Dorothy L. Sayers.

As someone who just turned 50, I look forward to this state-of-being.

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I'd 2nd Katie's idea of the Loire Cab Franc along with at least one from Trentino in NE Italy. Which B.C. one's did you try? It is a rising star varietal in the Okanagan Valley here in B.C. They are pretty tasty with herbed lamb and tomatoey dishes.

Cheers,

Stephen Bonner

Vancouver

Edited by SBonner (log)

"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

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The problem with Cab Franc, at least with those made in the US, is that there is very little of it made. Obviously the Pride is a must, but I'd also try to find some from Washington. I particularly like the Owen Sullivan (now OS) Champoux Vineyard but I had to go to the winery to get it. Spring Valley makes a good one too as does Owen Roe.

As for matching foods, I'd think of it as a less robust Cabernet Sauv. and match it like that.

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Which B.C. one's did you try? It is a rising star varietal in the Okanagan Valley here in B.C. They are pretty tasty with herbed lamb and tomatoey dishes.

We tried several while in the Okanagan Valley. We spent a week in either Vancouver or O.V. I can't recall any names :wacko:. We likeed many, and really enjoyed several. None are any available here in Texas :sad::angry::sad:

I like the idea of having old/new world comparisons.

kc

" Time and trouble will tame an advanced young woman, but an advanced old woman is uncontrollable by any earthly force."--Dorothy L. Sayers.

As someone who just turned 50, I look forward to this state-of-being.

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Another interesting New World comparision might be the Cabernet Franc from Casa Rodena in neighboring Albuquerque, NM. Yes, you read that right, Albuquerque.

Their grapes come from different parts of NM and S. Colorado. They are best known for their Cabernet Franc. I tasted their wines recently and thought they were pretty good. I don't have as much experience tasting Cabernet Franc but I thought the wine had some real interest and complexity. (I enjoyed their sangioveses a bit more.)

Here's a link to their web page with a description of their wines: Casa Rodena

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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The Crocker & Starr wine was quite vegetal, with a distinct green pepper nose, and was a great match for grilled steak.

I totally don't get the green bell pepper thing in California wines -- to me this is poor craftsmanship on the part of the winemaker, often showing the grapes having been picked too early. I find it most often in wines from the Stags Leap district and is close to where Crocker & Starr's vineyards are (Yountville).

My latest favorite CabFrancs are coming from William Harrison and Ehlers Estate Winery, having acquired a case of Cab Franc from each of these producers.

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I recently had a fabulous Cabernet Franc from Burrell School Winery in Los Gatos, CA. It was quite enjoyable and would easily lay down for a couple of years. The Town of Los Gatos settles at the Northern base of the Santa Cruz mounatins and has a wonderful climate for growing this grape as well as Pinot. You can find them at burrellschool.com.

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I recently had a fabulous Cabernet Franc from Burrell School Winery in Los Gatos, CA.  It was quite enjoyable and would easily lay down for a couple of years.  The Town of Los Gatos settles at the Northern base of the Santa Cruz mounatins and has a wonderful climate for growing this grape as well as Pinot.  You can find them at burrellschool.com.

Thank you for reminding me of this small winery--and that they have Cabernet Franc. A good friend has been on the lookout especially for Cabernet Francs so this will be nice to check out again soon.

We visited Burrell School about a year ago and had a mixed opinion overall on the wines although I found them interesting enough to definately check them out a few more times. As I recall, most of the reds we tasted were quite "big" with plenty of tannins. That being said, David Bruce Santa Cruz Mtn reds are pretty big as well and I very much enjoy David Bruce wines.

The Burrell School winery also has one of the lovliest settings among the many CA wineries I've visiited. We had a picnic lunch there next to the old restored schoolhouse and accompanied by a bottle of one of their reds (can't recall which. We had incomparable views over the vineyards, through the mountains and to the ocean.

Do you know if they do source most of their grapes from the Santa Cruz mountains?

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I also agree with many of the above statements. If you want a Loire Valley wine at a good price that's off the beatten path, i suggest the 2004 Bonny Doon DEWN Cabernet Franc. i'm a big fan of randal grahmn. as for food paring, id pair this wine with herb (thymne, rosemarry, and tarragon) crusted venison loin, served over a bed of braised beet greens that have a small hint of spice and garlic in them, and tomato and roasted red pepper con fit..

oh and heres the link...

https://secure5.nexternal.com/shared/StoreF...ount2=132758736

its under wines, dewn, toward the bottom

Edited by djsexyb (log)

Grand Cru Productions

Private High End Dinners and Personal Chef Service

in Chicago, Illinois

For more information email me at:

grandcruproductions@hotmail.com

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Ladies and Gents

I'll be hosting some friends for an exploration into Cab Franc.  A couple of years ago I got some interesting Cab Francs while touring B.C.  Now I'm in Austin, and want to try 2 or 3 new ones.

Any ideas about specifics? 

Also, I'm open to ideas about foods.  Real open.  I was thinking about some grilled lamb "stuffed" with fresh herbed pesto...???   Cheeses?  General directions?

Facts and opinions equally welcome.

kc

Hanna Winery http://www.hannawinery.com makes a wonderful Cab Franc from their Bismark Ranch Vineyard up on the Sonoma Co. side of Mt. Veeder.

Very rich with none of the herbal, green pepper character that some Napa and Sonoma Cab Francs have.

The web site shows the 2000 vintage for sale but you can get the 2001 which is from a much better year.

David

Edited by David94928 (log)
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One of the more memorable domesitc Cab Francs I've had was from Cooper Garrod (Santa Cruz Mountains). I also enjoyed one from Reverie (Napa Valley). One suggestion for starting out would be Jouget's Chinon Rose from the Loire. It's a Cab Franc rose wine.

We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

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One of the more memorable domesitc Cab Francs I've had was from Cooper Garrod (Santa Cruz Mountains).  I also enjoyed one from Reverie (Napa Valley).  One suggestion for starting out would be Jouget's Chinon Rose from the Loire.  It's a Cab Franc rose wine.

I love the idea of starting with a rose. And I'll look for the Hanna as well. I've spoken to 2 or 3 distributors in Austin and know that I can get those. The ones from New Mexico and even Washington are difficult.

kcd

" Time and trouble will tame an advanced young woman, but an advanced old woman is uncontrollable by any earthly force."--Dorothy L. Sayers.

As someone who just turned 50, I look forward to this state-of-being.

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One of the more memorable domesitc Cab Francs I've had was from Cooper Garrod (Santa Cruz Mountains).  I also enjoyed one from Reverie (Napa Valley).  One suggestion for starting out would be Jouget's Chinon Rose from the Loire.  It's a Cab Franc rose wine.

I love the idea of starting with a rose. And I'll look for the Hanna as well. I've spoken to 2 or 3 distributors in Austin and know that I can get those. The ones from New Mexico and even Washington are difficult.

kcd

The Hanna Cab Franc is likely available directly from the winery only since the production is around 200 cases.

David

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Why, or why does that info about Hanna make me definitely want to get it. It is available here in Austin, so it is probably near the top of the listing.

silly, shallow woman..... but I'm sure that it's good wine.

kcd

" Time and trouble will tame an advanced young woman, but an advanced old woman is uncontrollable by any earthly force."--Dorothy L. Sayers.

As someone who just turned 50, I look forward to this state-of-being.

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Share on other sites

The Crocker & Starr wine was quite vegetal, with a distinct green pepper nose, and was a great match for grilled steak.

I totally don't get the green bell pepper thing in California wines -- to me this is poor craftsmanship on the part of the winemaker, often showing the grapes having been picked too early. I find it most often in wines from the Stags Leap district and is close to where Crocker & Starr's vineyards are (Yountville).

My latest favorite CabFrancs are coming from William Harrison and Ehlers Estate Winery, having acquired a case of Cab Franc from each of these producers.

The "green bell pepper thing" is often a result of under ripe grapes (as you note) this is most often due to vintage problems/weather (in the Loire) and wine making problems or vineyard location is warmer climates like California.

I have tasted this problem in California merlot planted in poor sites--overly herbal, vegetal notes and a weedy thin quality.

I have not "seen" it much lately in California Cab F's.

It seems to rear its head more often in LI wines as well as Loire cab francs--again climate.

When the vintage complies the loire and LI can produce some exciting wines. I like any number of California Cab Francs but often they suffer the problem of too hot climate.

Regardless of where the wine is made or the grapes grown really fine wines are a result of a delicate balance of nature and the hand of man (or woman).

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One of the more memorable domesitc Cab Francs I've had was from Cooper Garrod (Santa Cruz Mountains).  I also enjoyed one from Reverie (Napa Valley).  One suggestion for starting out would be Jouget's Chinon Rose from the Loire.  It's a Cab Franc rose wine.

I love the idea of starting with a rose. And I'll look for the Hanna as well. I've spoken to 2 or 3 distributors in Austin and know that I can get those. The ones from New Mexico and even Washington are difficult.

kcd

Domaine Gasnier also makes a lovely rose Chinon. I served it a few years back with a baked ham and it was spectacularly perfect together. The wine and the meat were the same lovely shade of pink. Looked pretty at the table!

Domaine Gasnier is a very reliable producer of Chinon, so even if you can only find their reds, it's a solid bet.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I'm excited to know you are focusing on this versatile and underrated red wine grape! - for once its not just a bridesmaid to Cab Sauvignon.

In the past, I've found that Cabernet Franc pairs particulary well with a lot of Greek dishes - especially lamb focused. Worth giving it a try.

I will also second the suggestion of adding a New Zealand Cab Franc to the flight. Especially those from Hawkes Bay. Delish!

Latitude Cellars, Wine Imports

www.LatitudeCellars.com

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gosh, i almost forgot about one of my favorite cab franc's.

2002 Vinoce Cabernet Franc, it is a blend with 25% Cab Sauv, and 15% Merlot.

it comes from mt. veeder in napa. its a very intense franc with plum and tobacco in the nose followed with gentle oak, blackberry, and brioche flavors. looooong finish. i highly recommend.

just a note: this vineyard in actually the properly of comedian/actor robin williams. he lives there, but really doesnt take any part in the vineyard which is owned by Brian Nuss who is also the winemaker.

Edited by djsexyb (log)

Grand Cru Productions

Private High End Dinners and Personal Chef Service

in Chicago, Illinois

For more information email me at:

grandcruproductions@hotmail.com

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I recently had a fabulous Cabernet Franc from Burrell School Winery in Los Gatos, CA.  It was quite enjoyable and would easily lay down for a couple of years.
Thank you for reminding me of this small winery--and that they have Cabernet Franc.
One of the more memorable domesitc Cab Francs I've had was from Cooper Garrod (Santa Cruz Mountains). ...

Don't know if all this will be useful for the Original Poster in Austin, Texas; but it's useful to me, thanks. I didn't know that the Santa Cruz Mountains AVA was such a source of Cabernet Franc wines and I visit some of those wineries periodically. The Ahlgren family's winery, also in Santa Cruz Mtns, has made a Cab Franc too if I remember. (Such a small business was it that on a visit to buy some Cabernet Sauvignon, maybe 10 years ago, Mr. Ahlgren, senior, had to spin labels onto blank Cabernet bottles at hand, to sell them. I told him I'm buying for contents, not the label. Must label it anyhow, he said: It's the law. Then he realized I'd distracted him into reaching for the wrong labels, which were Cabernet Franc as I recall. He pulled them off (glue still wet) -- I knew by this time not to ask him not to, as It's The Law -- and he ran them back through the machine with the correct labeling for the lot.

Cooper-Garrod is a remarkable operation (large family including former NASA test pilot turned winemaker -- the barn I've seen used for tasting was decorated with unusual photos of aircraft, occasionally crashed). These and the other 50 or so wineries in the Santa Cruz Mountains are laid out very differently from, say, the Napa Valley. (The ground goes up and down, so you must drive around hills and ridges to get from one winery to another.)

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