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RuthWells

DEMO -- Italian Meringue Buttercream

67 posts in this topic

After a few days in the fridge, I notice my IMBC seems to lose it's flavor and tastes more like butter. Has anyone else had this same experiance?

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After a few days in the fridge, I notice my IMBC seems to lose it's flavor and tastes more like butter.  Has anyone else had this same experiance?

Are you tasting it cold, or when it has returned to room temp? I've never had this problem when the buttercream is back to room temp.

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on a kitchenaid, sometimes the attachment doens't reach the very bottom of the bowl. i attach the attachment, but don't lock it in. this is kind of hard to explain, but...i don't shove it upwards and turn, you know? the attachment stays on, but reaches teh very bottom of the mixing bowl and always incoporates ALL of what's down there. maybe there would be less chance of a lump of sugar at the bottom if you tried this?

i made this frosting for the first time today, and...i didn't like it! it tasted like butter to me, even with vanilla paste. at room temperature, it was stiff and...had a greasy mouthfeel. i used a different recipe that called for three egg whites and two stick of soft butter. i'm sad, and convinced somethign went wrong.

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Everyone should try this buttercream at least once -- enjoy!

Thank you so much for the wonderful demo and tips. I' going to try this soon because I hate that the powdered sugar we get here isn't fine enough and often, you can still feel a little grittiness in buttercreams.

One little tip to add -- when combining the water and sugar to make the syrup, for those who are new or not comfortable at making a sugar syrup.  Put the water in the bowl pan first, then add the sugar.  More sugar dissolves this way without the need to stir.  Little tip my chef instructor passed on.

Great tip for beginners. Not only that but sometimes the sugar at the bottom will burn before it dissolves/melts. Now I always add water to the pan first.

No matter how hard I've tried, I always, always, always hit the beaters when pouring in the sugar syrup. When that happens, I get hardened bits of sugar in my buttercream. I also read once to pour it down the side of the bowl...when I did that, I had a giant lump of hardened sugar at the bottom of the bowl and and a broken buttercream.

The only way I can work it (and I have a 6qt KA) is to pull the bowl off the mixer, whisk in the syrup by hand (and man does it get stiff towards the end) and then quickly put it back on the mixer and proceed as directed.

Oh maaan ... that would be such a PITA for me coz I make lots of marshmallows. I have the Pro 600 Series 575W 6qt KA too. And I don't have that problem. There's a small space between the top of your flat beater or wire whisk and the bowl that you should be able to slowly pour a thin stream of syrup in. Use something with a spout; I find that my 1/4C measuring spoon with a pouring lip works best. And if your syrup pools at the bottom, I suggest you check the level of your bowl & beater. I recall reading it in the manual. It should work because I don't have syrup pooled at the bottom of the bowl. The beater should do a very fine job incorporating everything in the bowl. I don't even have to stop & scrape! I make about 15 to 20 batches of marshmallows per week. I already snapped the wire whisk (I only had the KA abt 7 months) and now will only use the flat beater for marshmallow making. I burned 3 regular stand mixers prior. :raz: Good Luck kthull, I hope you get it to work.

Kitchenaid makes a stronger 11 wire whisk for the 6 qt mixer. kitchenaid products go to countertop appliances then to stand mixer attachments and then scroll down to wire whips.

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Kitchenaid makes a stronger 11 wire whisk for the 6 qt mixer.  kitchenaid products go to countertop appliances then to stand mixer attachments and then scroll down to wire whips.

Thanks for the info.

Mine is the 14cup model KP26M (scroll to the last one) . The stronger wire doesn't list this model number. :sad: I have emailed KA to ask. I just bought the replacement though. :wacko:

I'm using the flat beater now but I do think using the wire whip makes it a tad fluffier. :unsure:

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kthull, on the stand itself... back of where the bowl sits, there's a steel thingy where the bowl snaps in, I think that is where you can make adjustment to the bowl height? I think you only need to make a slight tweak. I can't find my manual but I recall reading about this beater/whisk level adjustment. You should get it working as it should ... makes life easier. I really mean it, I don't even stop to scrape my bowl, not even once, while making my marshmallows.

I used to have to do that with regular mixers to ensure the gelatine and syrup gets mixed in properly.

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Kitchenaid makes a stronger 11 wire whisk for the 6 qt mixer.   kitchenaid products go to countertop appliances then to stand mixer attachments and then scroll down to wire whips.

Thanks for the info.

Mine is the 14cup model KP26M (scroll to the last one) . The stronger wire doesn't list this model number. :sad: I have emailed KA to ask. I just bought the replacement though. :wacko:

I'm using the flat beater now but I do think using the wire whip makes it a tad fluffier. :unsure:

The stronger 11 wire whisk works with 6 qt mixer..KP,KB,KD models

So it should be fine with yours. If you click on VIEW by the whisk it tell you .

I have that model and it works.


Edited by lapasterie (log)

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After a few days in the fridge, I notice my IMBC seems to lose it's flavor and tastes more like butter.  Has anyone else had this same experiance?

Are you tasting it cold, or when it has returned to room temp? I've never had this problem when the buttercream is back to room temp.

Ruth, I didn't mean to disappear on you! I caught a horrible cold. Anyway, I was adding only half of the flavor like you were when I noticed the loss of flavor. The last time I made it, I added the full 3 oz and it seems to be holding the flavor well.

So when you only add half, yours doesn't seem to change after a few days?

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After a few days in the fridge, I notice my IMBC seems to lose it's flavor and tastes more like butter.  Has anyone else had this same experiance?

Are you tasting it cold, or when it has returned to room temp? I've never had this problem when the buttercream is back to room temp.

Ruth, I didn't mean to disappear on you! I caught a horrible cold. Anyway, I was adding only half of the flavor like you were when I noticed the loss of flavor. The last time I made it, I added the full 3 oz and it seems to be holding the flavor well.

So when you only add half, yours doesn't seem to change after a few days?

Strange. I only ever use about 1.5 ounces of flavor, as the buttercream tends to separate on me when I add more, and I never have a problem with flavor fading. I wonder what everyone else's experiences have been?

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help from the experts please :smile: ok, assuming i've got the IMBC down to the T. and I want to incorporate like a praline paste (im using ChiantG's recipe). how much of the paste should I be able to incorporate in this particular recipe without compromising the texture of the buttercream but still impart a full flavor from the paste?


...a little bit of this, and a little bit of that....*slurp......^_^.....ehh I think more fish sauce.

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just add a little bit at a time until you get the flavor you want. i've been able to add quite a bit but it also depends on the texture of your praline paste. i was using macadamia nut paste and it was quite thin, so when i added a lot, it made for softer buttercream. still delicious, just a little more difficult to deal with on a cake. as a filling, it wouldn't have made too much of a difference.

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Can I freeze the unflavored buttercream, then take out as needed to mix it flavor?

I've seen some references to freezing buttercream, but now I can't find them.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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Can I freeze the unflavored buttercream, then take out as needed to mix it flavor?

I've seen some references to freezing buttercream, but now I can't find them.

Yup -- go right ahead. It freezes very well for several months. I put plastic wrap right on the surface to prevent ice crystals since I have a frost free freezer.

Let it warm up before re-beating and adding your flavoring.


Cheryl, The Sweet Side

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Very beautiful demo, thank you!

The last time I attempted this I overwhipped my eggwhites until they were dry :blush: but still tried to finish the buttercream...not good! Next time I will follow this to the letter, your buttercream looks fantastic!

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Can I freeze the unflavored buttercream, then take out as needed to mix it flavor?

I've seen some references to freezing buttercream, but now I can't find them.

Yup -- go right ahead. It freezes very well for several months. I put plastic wrap right on the surface to prevent ice crystals since I have a frost free freezer.

Let it warm up before re-beating and adding your flavoring.

Thank you!


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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I've made this type of buttercream many times, however, it always seems to take longer than 5 minutes for the mixture to cool down. I get worried and a few times I've added the butter too soon because I was concerned that I would overwhip italian meringue while waiting for it to cool. I managed to recover the buttercream those times but I want to get a feel for how long it has taken for others to cool the meringue. So has anyone else had to wait longer than 5 min. for the bowl to feel cool?

Thanks!

Chris

Yes, I find that it's closer to 15-20 mins. for the bowl to be cool and not warm or even tepid.

I love Italian Meringue Buttercream. :wub: So does my family. My mother swoons over it and when I make her a pineapple or lemon coconut cake, it's the icing recipe I use.

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I usually only skim over the pictures in these kinds of demonstrations but I actually read this one right the way through.

Little tips like re-warming the bowl with a hot towel, make it all a lot less daunting. Well done, Ruth.


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I usually only skim over the pictures in these kinds of demonstrations but I actually read this one right the way through.

Little tips like re-warming the bowl with a hot towel, make it all a lot less daunting. Well done, Ruth.

Gee, thanks -- I'm glad people are getting some use out of this demo!

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I usually only skim over the pictures in these kinds of demonstrations but I actually read this one right the way through.

Little tips like re-warming the bowl with a hot towel, make it all a lot less daunting. Well done, Ruth.

Gee, thanks -- I'm glad people are getting some use out of this demo!

Great demo and nice photos. I have made this item a few times and it comes out beautifully each time and I use it right away. Last week I made another batch and decided to place it in the refrig. and decorate the cake the next day. The IBC was hard and impossible to get back to the nice fluffy state. I nuked it for 20 secs. and used the paddle on it to no avail. So I dumped it and had to make another batch, so I've made a note to myself not to refrig. next time.

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I usually only skim over the pictures in these kinds of demonstrations but I actually read this one right the way through.

Little tips like re-warming the bowl with a hot towel, make it all a lot less daunting. Well done, Ruth.

Gee, thanks -- I'm glad people are getting some use out of this demo!

Great demo and nice photos. I have made this item a few times and it comes out beautifully each time and I use it right away. Last week I made another batch and decided to place it in the refrig. and decorate the cake the next day. The IBC was hard and impossible to get back to the nice fluffy state. I nuked it for 20 secs. and used the paddle on it to no avail. So I dumped it and had to make another batch, so I've made a note to myself not to refrig. next time.

That is curious -- I refrige this buttercream all the time (I even freeze it) with no ill effect. The key is to let it come back to room temp gradually, over several hours, on the counter before rebeating. The high butter content does render it pretty solid straight out of the fridge.

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I usually only skim over the pictures in these kinds of demonstrations but I actually read this one right the way through.

Little tips like re-warming the bowl with a hot towel, make it all a lot less daunting. Well done, Ruth.

Gee, thanks -- I'm glad people are getting some use out of this demo!

Great demo and nice photos. I have made this item a few times and it comes out beautifully each time and I use it right away. Last week I made another batch and decided to place it in the refrig. and decorate the cake the next day. The IBC was hard and impossible to get back to the nice fluffy state. I nuked it for 20 secs. and used the paddle on it to no avail. So I dumped it and had to make another batch, so I've made a note to myself not to refrig. next time.

That is curious -- I refrige this buttercream all the time (I even freeze it) with no ill effect. The key is to let it come back to room temp gradually, over several hours, on the counter before rebeating. The high butter content does render it pretty solid straight out of the fridge.

Yes I think you are correct. I didn't let it come back to room temp, I just took it from the refrig. nuked it and then beat it.

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It's better to give it a few hours at rm temp but if you are stuck, this method might work for you. If you can, refrigerate it in ziplock bags - press out as much air as possible. When you're ready to use it, break it apart into chunks into the mixer bowl.

Take no more than 1/3 of it and zap that in the microwave until it is soft (not melted into a liquid, but very soft - it should take only a few seconds). Using the flat beater on low speed, add a little bit of the softened buttercream and let it go for a minute or two. Then add more of the softened buttercream. If it doesn't seem to be coming together after 2-3 mins, take a little more out and zap it again. If it breaks, it might not come back at all so you have to be a little cautious. (If the kitchen is quite cold, it will take longer than if the kitchen is warm.) Sometimes I've been known to wave the blowtorch around the outside of the mixer bowl for a few seconds just to help it along. But you have to keep it moving constantly or you risk scorching. You're just trying to warm up the sides of the bowl, not trying to melt it.

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on a kitchenaid, sometimes the attachment doens't reach the very bottom of the bowl. i attach the attachment, but don't lock it in. this is kind of hard to explain, but...i don't shove it upwards and turn, you know? the attachment stays on, but reaches teh very bottom of the mixing bowl and always incoporates ALL of what's down there. maybe there would be less chance of a lump of sugar at the bottom if you tried this?

i made this frosting for the first time today, and...i didn't like it!  it tasted like butter to me, even with vanilla paste. at room temperature, it was stiff and...had a greasy mouthfeel. i used a different recipe that called for three egg whites and two stick of soft butter. i'm sad, and convinced somethign went wrong.

I will surely try that tip! Thanks Cathryn! I have the same problem with the kitchenaid beater not reaching the very bottom...which is why I have to always scrape the bottom for "settled" or stuck ingredients.


I am in the process of fulfilling a dream, one that involves a huge stainless kitchen, heavenly desserts and lots of happy sweet-toothed people.

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For those who have tried both, which do you prefer: IMBC or Neoclassic Buttercream (as per RLB)?

Neoclassic buttercream seems easier to make, but would it taste too eggy and be less light and fluffy on account of not having any whites?

I want to make a lemon buttercream for cake filling by combining lemon curd from Fine Cooking (from the Best Lemon Curd thread) with a buttercream to make it less runny, and find IMBC somewhat daunting. When I made it recently, it looked curdled, I gave up on it, then put it in a sink of cold water and rebeat it and it came together quite miraculously, but was a rather stressful experience.


"I'll just die if I don't get this recipe."

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Well, I usually make Neoclassic, but I use Flo Braker's recipe.

I've used this IMBC recipe, but I find that I like egg yolk buttercreams better usually.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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