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Pot still rums


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I am wondering what rums out there are 100% pot still and not a blend of pot still and continuous/column/Coffey still. I like pot still whisk(e)y as it has richer flavor and more body (e.g, Red Breast 12yo), and I like the Appleton blend as the pot still part gives it more flavor.

(I went to Scotland a few weeks ago, and the people at the heritage centre kept talking about a Coffey still at a heritage centre there. I asked if it was the same thing as a continuous/column still, but it seems that they never heard of it. From the pictures and description at the centre, I reasoned on my own that a Coffey still is the same thing as a continuous/column still. I love the Scots as they name things for people, such as Mr. Coffey, and thus help preserve a bit of history.)

Edited by elixirofthetropics (log)
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Aeneas Coffey patented the Coffey still in 1832 after Robert Stein introduced a two-column continuous still in 1826.

While a number of rum marketers claim to be selling rum made in pot stills several of the distilleries where these spirits are born don't even have a pot still. Much more important than the type of still are the raw ingredients and the skill and experience of the distiller.

When making rum from molasses, pot still rums are generally too high in congeners to be pleasant to drink so distillers blend these flavorful rums with more highly distilled continuous column still rum.

Where rums are being made from freshly squeezed sugar cane juice, distillers don't have to distill their spirit to such a high proof and many prefer to distill to only about 72% alcohol, about the same as many pot still distillers in other industries.

When properly distilled, the distillate from a single-column continuous still can be even better than the distillate from a pot still. On the other hand, it is possible to redistill the distillate several times in a pot still and end up with something that is very similar to that obtained from a continuous column still.

The two biggest misconceptions I've discovered in the rum industry are that the older the better and that pot still rum is better than rum made in column stills.

Don't get hung up on the age of your rum, or the still. Much more important than age is maturity and much more important than the type of still is the raw material and the skill of the distiller.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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  • 1 month later...

Sorry Scheer, I should have written "much more important than the type of still is the raw material and the skill of the distiller and blender." Most rums bottled today are blends of several rums. The skill of the blender is equally important in the equation of what makes a good bottle of rum.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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  • 1 month later...
Sorry Scheer, I should have written "much more important than the type of still is the raw material and the skill of the distiller and blender." Most rums bottled today are blends of several rums. The skill of the blender is equally important in the equation of what makes a good bottle of rum.

May I thank you so much :rolleyes:

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