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How to make these...


glennbech
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I've never been to Paris, and I've never seen them quite like that before. What was their texture -- crispy and light like the smaller ones? Were they just meringue, or were they on a base?

If so, there are lots of recipes. I have several and I know others here have many as well.

Cheryl, The Sweet Side
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there's a really good recipe for meringue "stars" in RLB's Christmas Cookie book and if you pipe them like kisses and make them larger, they'll resemble what you pictured (is it too funny that you see bags of Lay's potato chips in the background? :raz: )

The bottom looks as if they developed "feet" like a macaron; that happens to me if I bake them too long, put the sheet pan too close to the bottom of the oven or don't let them dry out enough before baking.

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hmm..rather than having feet, they look to me as though the bottoms are dipped in something. Or maybe they have feet. :wink:

otherwise they look like just a simple meringue to me.

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i agree. a simple meringe dipped in chocolate or somethign else, flavored. look for a simple swiss meringe recipe, add your flavors, and pipe with a very large tip.

or you can just dollop then with a spoon and lift it up quickly to get the little peak.

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I know exactly what these are. I used to make them for a bakery in Chicago. Mocha,passionfruit,vanilla,mango..etc

Crisp on the outside and almost a cotton candy like texture on the inside. It was always the last thing I would make because they have to sit in a warm oven all night. So I had to wait until the bake was done for the day & the oven had cooled off almost completely.

It was a simple meringue with a lot of powdered sugar folded in & then a fruit compound was added. I'll have to dig out my old recipe book & see if I still have the recipe.

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I know exactly what these are. I used to make them for a bakery in Chicago. Mocha,passionfruit,vanilla,mango..etc

Crisp on the outside and almost a cotton candy like texture on the inside. It was always the last thing I would make because they have to sit in a warm oven all night. So I had to wait until the bake was done for the day & the oven had cooled off almost completely.

It was a simple meringue with a lot of powdered sugar folded in & then a fruit compound was added. I'll have to dig out my old recipe book & see if I still have the recipe.

You're exactly right! :-) Real fluffy on the inside and hard on the outside. I'd love it if you to dug out that recipe .-) I guess they involve a lot of work in a home kitchen maybe ?

Edited by glennbech (log)
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its not really a recipe just a technique.

Looks like they took a spatulay and make a large dollop on the parchment line sheet pan.

You can whip extremely low moisture products into meringue for flavoring. Most commonly used are powders, but I have used preserves.

The whole trick to the texture is the baking technique.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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I saw the same type of giant meringue in italy ( i call the the ameba because they had a non clear defined form :raz: )

But the meringue that we make as well take long long time in the oven just to dry out not really cooking ( I used to let the oven door crack open with a spoon and let the oven at the lowest set for many hours ).

I miss those sugar bombs P

Vanessa

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.

The whole trick to the texture is the baking technique.

Can you expound? What are the differences in the technique versus getting the meringues that are light and crispy all the way through?

Cheryl, The Sweet Side
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the ones that are light and crispy all the way through were probably dried at about 120degreesF for 24 hours. If you raise the temp and crips them at about 220 and take them out just at the point of browning you will get that soft center with the crisp outter layer.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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My mother used to make these "cookies" all the time during my childhood. I've got the recipe somewhere. If my mother can make them <bless her beautiful, shining heart> then you know its easy. As I recall its just egg whites, sugar, cream of tartar, maybe a pinch of salt. I think you beat until soft peak? Then bake.

Truely one of my most favorite foods in the world. I like them plain. They are melt in your mouth goodness! That special texture is really divine. Thanks for bringing back memories!

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