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yellow truffle

Chicago's foie gras list.

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From the article linked above by scordelia:

A daily special at a Lincoln Square restaurant has triggered the first -- and only -- official complaint stemming from Chicago's controversial ban on foie gras.

A caller to the city's 311 non-emergency system complained that foie gras was being served over the weekend at Block 44, 4365 N. Lincoln. The restaurant is not refuting the claim.

City Health Department spokesman Tim Hadac said the 311 complaint will trigger a letter to Block 44 "reminding them of the law and letting them know we expect compliance."

"If we get a second complaint, we'll be out there, ticket book in hand. If we find a violation if and when we inspect, we'll write 'em a ticket for $250," Hadac said.

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

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ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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"If we get a second complaint, we'll be out there, ticket book in hand. If we find a violation if and when we inspect, we'll write 'em a ticket for $250," Hadac said.

=R=


Julian's Eating - Tales of Food and Drink

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Apparently, we have our first false accusation. From today's Chicago Sun-Times:

Two restaurant patrons acting as Chicago's unofficial foie gras police called 311 on Tuesday to complain that foie gras was being sold illegally at Copper Blue, 530 E. Illinois.

"I'm not selling foie gras. It's illegal. You can't sell it. I have duck liver terrine on my menu. But it's not foie gras. It says on my menu that 'It isn't foie gras any Moore,'" said executive chef Michael Tsonton. He was referring to Ald. Joe Moore (49th), chief sponsor of the foie gras ban.

"Somebody must be mistaken. Maybe some people aren't real smart. I buy organic duck liver from a farmer in Indiana. We make our terrine out of those. The ducks are so well-fed and taken care of, they're quite delicious. The way we cook it, it has a similar consistency. But it's not foie gras."

Tsonton just so happens to be president of Chicago Chefs for Choice, the group that joined forces with the Illinois Restaurant Association to file a lawsuit against the ban.

Accused chef: 'It's not foie gras' by Fran Spielman.

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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On Sunday, I had dinner in a restaurant in Chicago that was recommended in this forum, and I saw at least 2 courses with foie gras in the chef's tasting menu.

And I didn't do my duty as a law-abiding citizen and report it.


"Nothing you could cook will ever be as good as the $2.99 all-you-can-eat pizza buffet." - my EX (wonder why he's an ex?)

My eGfoodblog: My corner of the Midwest

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The worm has turned.

From today's Chicago Tribune:

Two aldermen said Monday they have introduced a measure to repeal Chicago's ban on foie gras.

Both Ald. Bernard Stone (50th) and Ald. Burton Natarus (42nd) originally voted in favor of the foie gras legislation, but they said they have had second thoughts.

Aldermen seek repeal of fois gras ban by Gary Washburn.

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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More on the reversal by Fran Spielman in today's Chicago Sun-Times:

Now, a pair of influential aldermen have had enough. No longer willing to be the butt of jokes, Aldermen Burton F. Natarus (42nd) and Bernard Stone (50th) three weeks ago filed an ordinance with the city clerk to repeal the foie gras ban.
"People have to be able to exercise choices. If they think the creation of this liver dish is an irresponsible thing in terms of the treatment of animals, then they shouldn't eat it. They shouldn't order it...We have more important things to do."

Natarus said he went along with the foie gras ban because he's a softy for animals.

"It was a mistake in judgement -- and that can happen to anybody," Natarus said.

Natarus, Stone seek repeal of foie gras ban

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Apparently, this story has legs. More from today's Chicago Tribune:

The council "can't do every single thing in terms of regulating our lives," he [burton Natarus] said. "People should be able to exercise choices. If they feel the creation of this liver dish is an irresponsible thing, they shouldn't eat it."

And, "quite frankly," Natarus added, "we do an awful lot of things to animals and to fish. I think the fly fishermen who catch fish for sport and take the hook out and put the fish back are just as irresponsible as is this foie gras situation."

The Stone-Natarus proposal will get a hearing in the council's Health Committee. If it wins a majority of votes there, it goes to the full council. Repeal would require a simple majority of votes at a council meeting.
Colleen McShane, president of the Illinois Restaurant Association, applauded the Stone-Natarus measure.

"Given the full facts of the issue--for instance, the fiscal impact, the image damage--I think that the majority of the aldermen would probably consider repealing this," she said. "This foie gras [ban] turned Chicago, which is a great food city, into a mockery."

Lovers of liver may taste victory after all by Gary Washburn and Mark Caro.

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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I love it. Hopefully the madness will end soon. Maybe the Council will repeal the ban if a different MASH star will speak out in favor of the repeal. Does anyone know if Alan Alda is available?


-Josh

Now blogging at http://jesteinf.wordpress.com/

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There's some great information about the foie gras situation in this week's Daily Herald, reported by Leah A. Zeldes:

Earlier this year, the Whole Foods Market grocery chain, acting on "compassion standards" written with animal-rights groups like People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, reportedly stopped selling live lobsters and told a poultry supplier it wouldn't do business with the firm unless that company stopped serving a California foie-gras producer.

Yet the ban may have had an unintended effect. The controversy has inspired many people to try foie gras for the first time. Dozens of "farewell to foie" dinners led up to the final day. Two suburban restaurants, Michael in Winnetka and Bank Lane Bistro in Lake Forest, have added all-foie-gras menus. Even a retirement home, Holley Court Terrace in Oak Park, served it at a residents' cocktail party.

The fuss about foie gras

Also by Ms. Zeldes, in today's edition:

Foie gras primer:

How is it produced? A practice called "gavage" accelerates the gorging and fattening waterfowl naturally do before migrating. For two to three weeks before slaughter, farm workers hand feed each bird large amounts of food, typically twice a day, by inserting a tube through its mouth. The process takes between 2 and 60 seconds. Since birds store excess fat in their livers (unlike humans, who store it throughout their bodies), the extra feeding causes the liver to swell.

Where to dine on foie gras in the suburbs:

Le Francais, 269 S. Milwaukee Ave., Wheeling, (847) 541-7470. White Alba truffle custard with chestnut espuma, lobster ravioli and chilled foie gras on toast; foie gras-and-truffle mousse ravioli with port-wine sauce; foie-gras-filled rice crepe with fresh basil and banana water; French farm-raised ossetra caviar with roasted cauliflower emulsion, Hudson Valley foie gras "mi-cuit" in Sauternes with house-made brioche and liquid black truffle ravioli; chilled foie-gras torchon over fresh ginger vinaigrette with black summer truffle; seared foie gras with roasted plum and Armagnac sauce and Hudson Valley foie gras "napoleon," abalone mushroom "marine," mint-parsley pesto, blood orange and tangerine . . .

Bank Lane Bistro, 670 Bank Lane, Lake Forest, (847) 234-8802. Ongoing: Changing four-course degustation with foie gras in every course, including dessert - molten chocolate cake topped with seared foie gras; $55 . . .

Temperature is the key to cooking foie gras:

"Foie gras is like butter," said chef Roland Liccioni of Wheeling's Le Francais. It softens at room temperature.

There's all sorts of great information provided but check out the links promptly because, unfortunately, they will go 'dead' a week from today.

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Did anyone else notice the reference to foie gras in Chicago Magazine's review of Chef's Station (one of my favorite places, BTW)?

Seems like the foie gras controversy may go the same way as the Big Box ordinance - why should Chicago place needless restrictions on legal commerce when the only effect will be to drive business to the suburbs? Of course, if it drives more biz to Peter Mills' place, I don't have a problem wit that.

No connection other than a fan.

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How is it produced? A practice called "gavage" accelerates the gorging and fattening waterfowl naturally do before migrating. For two to three weeks before slaughter, farm workers hand feed each bird large amounts of food, typically twice a day, by inserting a tube through its mouth. The process takes between 2 and 60 seconds. Since birds store excess fat in their livers (unlike humans, who store it throughout their bodies), the extra feeding causes the liver to swell.

Hmmm...wow this is just like the movie supper size me when the Dr. warned him to change his diet because he was turnning his liver into fat.....hmmm...does that make Mc Donald dinners dumb as ducks and geese? Has anyone seen any of the city council at the local micky d's? hmmm I wonder if Tom Cruise will be dinning on micky d foie gras in a few years.lol

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How is it produced? A practice called "gavage" accelerates the gorging and fattening waterfowl naturally do before migrating. For two to three weeks before slaughter, farm workers hand feed each bird large amounts of food, typically twice a day, by inserting a tube through its mouth. The process takes between 2 and 60 seconds. Since birds store excess fat in their livers (unlike humans, who store it throughout their bodies), the extra feeding causes the liver to swell.

Hmmm...wow this is just like the movie supper size me when the Dr. warned him to change his diet because he was turnning his liver into fat.....hmmm...does that make Mc Donald dinners dumb as ducks and geese? Has anyone seen any of the city council at the local micky d's? hmmm I wonder if Tom Cruise will be dinning on micky d foie gras in a few years.lol

LMAO! Great point.

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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The AP is reporting- and it was picked up in the New York Times today- that Daley's signed on officially to supporting the repeal.

Mayor Richard M. Daley of Chicago has signed on to a proposed repeal of a month-old city ban on foie gras, his spokeswoman, Jacqueline Heard, said Thursday. The proposal was made by two aldermen. The City Council banned foie gras because of concerns of animal cruelty. Foie gras is made by force-feeding geese and ducks so their livers expand up to 10 times their normal size. The ban angered restaurant owners and many of their customers.

What do you mean I shouldn't feed the baby sushi?

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Actually, I don't understand why everybody is so angry around here.

Iam from europe, and I truly madly deeply love foie gras!

But Iam well aware of the fact that it is produced in a pretty damn cruel way. So Iam honest enough to say that I would be sad about a ban (for selfish reasons, of course), but that the people who are for such a ban are essentially right.

I mean: it is kinda paradox of us to go and buy the best organic food and the healthiest free range chickens on the one hand - and on the other hand eat an organ that is produced in anything but an "organic" way...

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Actually, I don't understand why everybody is so angry around here.

Iam from europe, and I truly madly deeply love foie gras!

But Iam well aware of the fact that it is produced in a pretty damn cruel way. So Iam honest enough to say that I would be sad about a ban (for selfish reasons, of course), but that the people who are for such a ban are essentially right.

I mean: it is kinda paradox of us to go and buy the best organic food and the healthiest free range chickens on the one hand - and on the other hand eat an organ that is produced in anything but an "organic" way...

My anger stems from the fact that the city of Chicago has chosen to invoke a ban on a product that my state and federal governments both categorize as completely legal. Additionally, since no foie gras is produced in Chicago (or the state of Illinois) the ban comes off as completely ridiculous political pandering. On top of that, most of us believe that foie gras production is no more cruel than conventional pork or poultry production, making the ban arbitrary and inconsitent. Of course, commercial pork and poultry producers have deep pockets and are not the ripe political targets that foie gras producers are. As Rick Tramonto said months ago (paraphrasing) 'you either eat animals or you don't.'

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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First, let me say again, that I adore foie gras.

making the ban arbitrary and inconsitent. 

Thats for sure. On the other hand you can start *somewhere*. But I don't really know anything about the Illinois (or US) food-politics. In germany the production of foie gras is illegal. But not the import/possession/selling/preparing...

Of course, commercial pork and poultry producers have deep pockets and are not the ripe political targets that foie gras producers are. 

Sad but true...

'you either eat animals or you don't.'

With all due respect, but that is just a silly statement about a complex subject...

On top of that, most of us believe that foie gras production is no more cruel than conventional pork or poultry production

Well, as I implied in my above post (actually, that was the point of my above post), I don't eat pork or poultry from "convential production" either. Do you?!?

greetings

kai

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On top of that, most of us believe that foie gras production is no more cruel than conventional pork or poultry production

Well, as I implied in my above post (actually, that was the point of my above post), I don't eat pork or poultry from "convential production" either. Do you?!?

Well, I don't normally buy them but I'm sure I've been served them at restaurants and other people's homes.

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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First, let me say again, that I adore foie gras.
making the ban arbitrary and inconsitent. 

Thats for sure. On the other hand you can start *somewhere*. But I don't really know anything about the Illinois (or US) food-politics. In germany the production of foie gras is illegal. But not the import/possession/selling/preparing...

Of course, commercial pork and poultry producers have deep pockets and are not the ripe political targets that foie gras producers are. 

Sad but true...

'you either eat animals or you don't.'

With all due respect, but that is just a silly statement about a complex subject...

On top of that, most of us believe that foie gras production is no more cruel than conventional pork or poultry production

Well, as I implied in my above post (actually, that was the point of my above post), I don't eat pork or poultry from "convential production" either. Do you?!?

greetings

kai

The only pork I seen raised in germany was pinned never seeing the light of day in a barn in the center of town. The ducks we are were pinned in the yard and every sunday once they became eatable they re killed by axing their neck and then my daughter would play with the feathers. Same thing with the cows for milk pinned and milked twice aday with the milk being dumpped into meatal contains waiting for the milk truck to pick them up. Pretty much Germany raises everything the same as us just on a smaller scale.

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@monkfish: I don't understand the sense and/or the relevance of your message.

@Ronnie:

Same goes for me. And that's where we come full circle: I might eat such meat in a friends house and I might like it - but at the same time I know it would be better if there was some sort of "ban" or stricter "regulations" for conventional meat production, since I know that the circumstances under wich the animal was brought up, have been pretty cruel

Same goes for foie gras: I eat it and I love it, but I can't honestly mind if there are people who think it should be banned or that there should be stricter regulations.

As I said, it is kind of a paradox.


Edited by kai-m (log)

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kai-m,

I don't think the ban would have bothered me nearly as much if it had taken production methods into account. But, to lump all foie gras into same category seems to actually indicate a lack of understanding about it. It really is a sad pardox.

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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@monkfish: I don't understand the sense and/or the relevance of your message.

@Ronnie:

Same goes for me. And that's where we come full circle: I might eat such meat in a friends house and I might like it - but at the same time I know it would be better if there was some sort of "ban" or stricter "regulations" for conventional meat production, since I know that the circumstances under wich the animal was brought up, have been pretty cruel

Same goes for foie gras: I eat it and I love it, but I can't honestly mind if there are people who think it should be banned or that there should be stricter regulations.

As I said, it is kind of a paradox.

Ronnie pretty much summed it up I've seen how animals were raised in Germany and it sounds like they just singled out foie gras.

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Alderman Moore (49th ward) now has a challenger for his aldermanic seat, a newspaper editor named, Chris Adams who is being backed by local business owners according to the Tribune (link to article). The article basically just rehashes Joe Moore's latest controversies and emphasizes that he has lost support of local business owners.

Rogers Park is in two different wards. Now, my Rogers Park alderman, Bernard Stone (the 50th), is the one is proposed the repeal of the foie gras ban.


S. Cue

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I guess New York's Board of Health got jealous of all the attention Chicago was getting. They've announced that we're moving forward with banning transfats. Well, at least you're not alone in being embarrassed.

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My anger stems from the fact that the city of Chicago has chosen to invoke a ban on a product that my state and federal governments both categorize as completely legal.  Additionally, since no foie gras is produced in Chicago (or the state of Illinois) the ban comes off as completely ridiculous political pandering.  On top of that, most of us believe that foie gras production is no more cruel than conventional pork or poultry production, making the ban arbitrary and inconsitent.  Of course, commercial pork and poultry producers have deep pockets and are not the ripe political targets that foie gras producers are.  As Rick Tramonto said months ago (paraphrasing) 'you either eat animals or you don't.'

=R=

Since the Chicago City Council is considering a repeal, this is everyone's chance to weigh in with their opinions again. Here is a link to the e-mail addresses for all fifty aldermen. Tell them what you think!

Aldermen's E-mails


Edited by scordelia (log)

S. Cue

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