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John Talbott

Vegetarian, Vegan, Veggie Friendly, Etc.

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Vegetarian, vegan, veggie friendly, etc. restaurants

A compendium of existing topics

This is one of a series of compendia that seeks to provide information available in prior topics on eGullet. Please feel free to add links to additional topics or posts or to add suggestions.

Vegetarian haute cuisine

Paris vegetarian restaurants

Edited by John Talbott (log)

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Grand Venise is great for veggies and non. Fresh tomatoes(with the entire table as accompaniments), lentil salad, humungous white(I can't for the life of me remember the name of them) bean salad, peppers, roasted aubergines/onions etc etc.

Well worth a trip but make sure you're hungry before going!

Food glorious food, nothing quite like it...

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