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Korean Hang-Over Food


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Favorite Korean hang over dishes?

I love the potato and neck bone soup. I unfortunately can't remember the name, but when I went to visit my relatives in Seoul in 2003 I had this at a restaurant that specialized in only this dish.

The dish consisted of huge boiled potatos and neck bones in a spicy broth. It was incredibly spicy and was made in a huge dish in the middle of the table

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There is a whole section in Korean cuisine for hangover food and I can't find any links related to it.

The only dishes I know that are eaten specifically for curing hangovers are the potato and neck bone soup and a bone based broth with blood. I'm sure I know more but I am having a brain fart -- it's the beer

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Favorite Korean hang over dishes?

I love the potato and neck bone soup.  I unfortunately can't remember the name, but when I went to visit my relatives in Seoul in 2003 I had this at a restaurant that specialized in only this dish. 

The dish consisted of huge boiled potatos and neck bones in a spicy broth.  It was incredibly spicy and was made in a huge dish in the middle of the table

I spent many late nights/early morning in Seoul getting over...well you get the idea...

hanogver cures? Soup, all different kinds of soup, the spicier the better. But my favorite is kalbitang at 3:00 am in the middle of winter at a tiny hole in the wall in Itaewon.

Maybe the soup you are talking about is haejangguk? My reference for these things is taking a bath at the moment.

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

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Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

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yeah any time I have a hangover or feel nauseous my mother makes me eat incredibly, spicy, fish soup. REALLY REALLY spicy food doesn't sound like it would be good for you when you are on the verge of puking....but it really makes you feel better

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hubbys uncle strongly claimed that if you drink water that has soaked dried up onion skins, the hangovers disappear.

huh.

okay, on <a href="http://kr.rd.yahoo.com/ks/know/relknow/*http://kr.ks.yahoo.com/service/ques_reply/ques_view.html?dnum=GAD&qnum=44147&affinity=no">this page</a> they state that bukeo guk (pollack soup - <a href="http://kr.ks.yahoo.com/service/ques_reply/ques_view.html?dnum=GAD&qnum=4480309">recipe in korean</a>) is the best for hangovers.

it goes on to say that bukeo has methionine (an amino acid) and so it helps to break down alcohol to help the liver along and it also helps stimulate the production of urine which helps your body more quickly rid itself of aldehydes.

<a href="http://kr.ks.yahoo.com/service/ques_reply/ques_view.html?dnum=FAJ&qnum=58775">this site says</a>

pig blood soup has lots of iron and protein and it also includes soy bean sprouts and radish and so they somehow break down the toxic alcohol.

soybean sprout soup is the best for hangovers. soybean sprout soup contains asparagine which is another amino acid which stimulates aldehyde dehydrogenase. the root tips of the soybean sprout contains the most asparagine [so you really shouldnt break those off!]

clam soup has taurine and betaine. they help protect the liver.

oysters have lots of vitamins and minerals.

vegetable extract juice, radish, cucumbers, chives, spinach, lotus root, chirk (chilk? dont know the english), pine leaves and insam (aka ginseng)

... there are a few more things on that page; maybe another day...

i have no personal experience with any of this. i only had a hangover once and i didnt know any better to try to treat it.

that day that i went through it, i was certain that i was going to die. it was as horrible hangover.

"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo
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hangover once? wow you are a very very lucky person

as I type this, my boyfriend is lying on the cold living room floor, drunk out of his mind

he could probably use some spicy korean concoction tomorrow. (too bad he hates all things korean)

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I believe the potato and neck bone stew is called Gamja tang. I like it.

However, my fav of all time hands down is HaeJangGook. Spicy hot soup made with beef parts (neck, tripe, etc) and poached beef blood cakes. Yum. Really helps you sweat out the alcahol.

I also have like Tonggol (sp?). It is poached spinal cord (can we say mad cow) of cows. I like my dipped in a very spicy soy base dip. Yum.

Soondae gook also works well for me. As someone mentioned soups is really excellent hangover cure and for me spicier the better.

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My impression is that Kamja Tang (Potato Soup) is in between a wee hours of the morning drinking dish and a hangover dish. Haejangkuk (Hangover Soup) is specifically for hangovers, but it's also good for a cold winter night. And it seems every restaurant around me has a 2,900 won Haejangkuk lunch special these days.

I call it Dinosaur Soup because it looks like something Fred Flinstone would eat. Did a bit about it on my site:

Dinosaur Soup: HaeJangKuk

<a href='http://www.zenkimchi.com/FoodJournal' target='_blank'>ZenKimchi Korean Food Journal</a> - The longest running Korean food blog

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Kimchi bokkumbap; gun mandu; or incredibly greasy doncasse eaten while watching AFN PSAs...

alternatively; slices of Rich Gold Pizza Hut pizza (the kind with the ring of sweet potato puree around the crust) eaten with the sweet-pickle juice soaking into the crust. Not exactly authentic Korean, but perfect for soaking up the chemical afterburn of a night spent drinking Cass Draft.

or; whatever's left on the living room floor including but not limited to; errant yang-pa rings; strips of barbecue-flavoured dried squid; or beer nuts.

ah, memories.

Sorry, I guess that would be a better reply to "Food I ate in Korea while hung-over" thread than "Korean Hangover Food".

Those little croissants that Paris Baguette would sell, with the chopped hot dog, mayonnaise, sweet corn, cheese and ketchup weren't all that bad, either.

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I call it Dinosaur Soup because it looks like something Fred Flinstone would eat.  Did a bit about it on my site:

Dinosaur Soup: HaeJangKuk

Really enjoyed the blog link. 2,900 won, I can't believe how cheap it is. Is that $4? If I lived in korea, I don't know that I would ever cook? I also love the food delivery service there, especially for lunch where they bring the food to you.

BTW, how is the street food experience in Seoul these days?

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I call it Dinosaur Soup because it looks like something Fred Flinstone would eat.  Did a bit about it on my site:

Dinosaur Soup: HaeJangKuk

Really enjoyed the blog link. 2,900 won, I can't believe how cheap it is. Is that $4? If I lived in korea, I don't know that I would ever cook? I also love the food delivery service there, especially for lunch where they bring the food to you.

BTW, how is the street food experience in Seoul these days?

The 2,900 won ($3) HaeJangKuk is the kind with just blood in it. No meat. I had it once, and even though I'm not squeamish about blood pudding, it was overkill.

The reason I am short on Korean recipes on my site is that it's about as cheap to eat out as it is to cook at home when it comes to Korean food in Korea. I'm also a fan of the food delivery experience. It contributes to me putting up with the crazy motor scooters zooming in and out of the sidewalks. There's a video on YouTube of a chicken delivery service where they deliver the food in a chicken costume.

There was a Chinese place I used to order from. I'd order then run downstairs and across the street to grab some beer. By the time I'd return, the guy would be already standing outside my door.

Seoul street food is still the beondaeggi, fried bits and pieces, grilled dried squid, deokbokki, odeng, and sundae. Inside Seoul, I'm noticing a trend towards more Japanese street foods, specifically, takoyaki. And one time -- one time -- there was a hot dog cart near my house.

<a href='http://www.zenkimchi.com/FoodJournal' target='_blank'>ZenKimchi Korean Food Journal</a> - The longest running Korean food blog

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I put up some pics of a typical street food set up here

My favourite Korean street foods are the sweet things. Hotuk, and those little waffle balls stuffed with sweet white bean paste, shaped like walnuts...what were they called...Hodu-something? And the the fish breads. Who could forget those? Although it seems they might be Japanese in origin as well.....nothing is better than coming down off of Gwanaksan on a late fall day, and getting a hotuk on your way to the subway station.

Insadong has the most famous hotuk makers, with the 15 minute line-ups...Zenkimchi, do you have a favourite?

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Seoul street food is still the beondaeggi, fried bits and pieces, grilled dried squid, deokbokki, odeng, and sundae.  Inside Seoul, I'm noticing a trend towards more Japanese street foods, specifically, takoyaki.  And one time -- one time -- there was a hot dog cart near my house.

When I was a kid, I used to love beondaeggi. I cannot (I've looked) find it in the states. Last time I was in korea, we were on the east sea near sorak. Street vendors sold this small snails (cone shaped) in styrol foam cups for 200 won. They were amazing, especially the juice on the bottom of the cup. Another thing I can't get in the states. I don't even know what they are called.

Sorrry to be off topic.

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Seoul street food is still the beondaeggi, fried bits and pieces, grilled dried squid, deokbokki, odeng, and sundae.  Inside Seoul, I'm noticing a trend towards more Japanese street foods, specifically, takoyaki.  And one time -- one time -- there was a hot dog cart near my house.

When I was a kid, I used to love beondaeggi. I cannot (I've looked) find it in the states. Last time I was in korea, we were on the east sea near sorak. Street vendors sold this small snails (cone shaped) in styrol foam cups for 200 won. They were amazing, especially the juice on the bottom of the cup. Another thing I can't get in the states. I don't even know what they are called.

Sorrry to be off topic.

Seoraksan was the first place I tried beondaeggi... from the styro cup. I have a video of it on my site (Saraksan part 1).

<a href='http://www.zenkimchi.com/FoodJournal' target='_blank'>ZenKimchi Korean Food Journal</a> - The longest running Korean food blog

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Seoraksan was the first place I tried beondaeggi... from the styro cup. I have a video of it on my site (Saraksan part 1).

how different is that from gol bang ee? I love those little sea snails mixed with go chu ga ru and dried cuttle fish. They make a great drinking snack

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Seoraksan was the first place I tried beondaeggi... from the styro cup. I have a video of it on my site (Saraksan part 1).

how different is that from gol bang ee? I love those little sea snails mixed with go chu ga ru and dried cuttle fish. They make a great drinking snack

Isn't beondaeggi stewed silk worm larva? Gol bang ee, isn't that snails? I've never cooked Gol bang ee but they always seemed to have samples at the local korean grocery. I had some on Sunday and it was good. These were pretty large snails. Yum.

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omg gross. silk worm larvae and snails are not even close...sorry. I can still remember the smell of those silk worms steaming in a huge metal pot on a cold winter day. My american father LOVES them.

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omg gross.  silk worm larvae and snails are not even close...sorry. .

I really thought beondaeggi and Gol bang ee were silk warm larvae and snails respectively. If not what are they? I guess I have my terms all confuse...

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Isn't beondaeggi stewed silk worm larva?  Gol bang ee, isn't that snails?  I've never cooked Gol bang ee but they always seemed to have samples at the local korean grocery.  I had some on Sunday and it was good.  These were pretty large snails. Yum.
yes and yes.

beon de gi = silk worm larvae

gol baeng i = snails

"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo
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I hope you don't mind.  I posted my reply in the "Hotok and other Korean street food" thread so that we could continue to talk about this and not swerve way off this thread's topic.

you can always just ask kristin to move the posts over. :wink:

"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo
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  • 1 month later...

There's various types of haejangguk - you wouldn't even think they'd have anything in common beside that they contain hot liquid. First kind I had had dried pollack and not much else - thin, bland and uninteresting. Just the restaurant I guess, 'cause I've had better pollack haejangguk since. There's bbyeo haejangguk - that's something similar to kamjatang, but maybe without the potatos - big spine bones in soup. Another kinds uses a lot of spinach. Then there's the pork blood kind. And a kind that focuses on having lots of soybean sprouts. Probably more I've missed....

There's a street in Jongno, in Seoul, that has some famous drinking establishments. The next street over has famous haejangguk restaurants - conveniently located!

-phage-

Gac

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