Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Jack Fisher

Flavored salt

Recommended Posts

I came across some flavored salt at a farmers market. This was really salt crystals infused with flavor. Roasted garlic, Chipolte lime etc. I bought some and it is quite good. Does anyone know how this process is done? How do you infuse the crystals with the flavor and keep them crystal shaped?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All you need to do is put the salt in a container with the desired flavor component and let it sit. If you have a vacume packing machine you can speed up the process otherwise you should let it sit and pull the favoring agents once the desired taste is achieved. Or if your hardcore you can smoke the salt with the desired ingredient.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My friend made smoked salt by putting a tray of salt in the smoker when he made some pork. Use it on steaks, roasted vegetables, anything you want to have a subtle smoky taste.

Damn he is smart...


"It's better to burn out than to fade away"-Neil Young

"I think I hear a dingo eating your baby"-Bart Simpson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My friend made smoked salt by putting a tray of salt in the smoker when he made some pork. Use it on steaks, roasted vegetables, anything you want to have a subtle smoky taste.

Damn he is smart...


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was just plain kosher salt. Plain smoky tasty kosher salt. :biggrin:


"It's better to burn out than to fade away"-Neil Young

"I think I hear a dingo eating your baby"-Bart Simpson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I wonder if the salt needs the equivalent of a pellicle. Perhaps tossing it with a few drops of neutral oil would do the trick?

I tasted my first smoked salt today. Amazing stuff, I'm looking forward to trying it with caramel. I found it wet and noticed on the ingredients that it listed soy oil. I'll try making some next time I smoke fish. I wonder if any type of oil would be better than any other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I wonder if the salt needs the equivalent of a pellicle. Perhaps tossing it with a few drops of neutral oil would do the trick?

I tasted my first smoked salt today. Amazing stuff, I'm looking forward to trying it with caramel. I found it wet and noticed on the ingredients that it listed soy oil. I'll try making some next time I smoke fish. I wonder if any type of oil would be better than any other.

It doesnt require any kind of pellicle, so the oil/water/moistening isn't necessary. It's simply coarse kosher salt and smoke...


"It's better to burn out than to fade away"-Neil Young

"I think I hear a dingo eating your baby"-Bart Simpson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How does smoked salt compare with liquid smoke?

Liquid smoke is hardwood smoke that is condensed into a liquid. There is no salt in liquid smoke (if there is, the quality of that brand is suspect). Smoked salt is kosher salt that has been exposed to hardwood smoke for a few hours...


"It's better to burn out than to fade away"-Neil Young

"I think I hear a dingo eating your baby"-Bart Simpson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I put fresh garlic and kosher salt in the processor.....It's great on fries

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...