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Monkfish liver (foie de lotte)


A Balic
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Hiroyuki, are there certain vegetables or other ingredients which "should" go into the nabe for anko nabe? And what about the dipping sauce or other condiments?

I made a New Year's resolution LAST year to seek out more local specialties, and monkfish is definitely part of the Chiba/Ibaraki repertoire...but I've never made/eaten it. I'd appreciate some tips to get me started before the monkfish disappear from the shops in springtime.

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Hiroyuki, are there certain vegetables or other ingredients which "should" go into the nabe for anko nabe? And what about the dipping sauce or other condiments?

I made a New Year's resolution LAST year to seek out more local specialties, and monkfish is definitely part of the Chiba/Ibaraki repertoire...but I've never made/eaten it. I'd appreciate some tips to get me started before the monkfish disappear from the shops in springtime.

First of all, let me congratulate you on your recent appointment as a host. I know this is off topic, but I didn't want to disturb you with a PM.

I almost responded, "Are you kidding?" Nabe ingredients are pretty much the same in any nabe, aren't they? Hakusai (Chinese cabbage), negi (Japanese scallion, green onion, whatever you call it), carrot, mushrooms (shiitake, buna-shimeji, enoki, etc.), tofu, etc., etc.

No dipping sauce, because the broth is seasoned with miso.

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Monkfish liver is probably served in a great many Japanese restaurants. I know it's frequently available at Tomoe Sushi. Look for ankimo if it's not listed under its English name. It's usually served with a ponzu sauce.

I recently had akimono at Poway Sushi Lounge (Poway, CA)...I saw it on the daily special board and asked what it was...he said monkfish liver so I said "let me try it" and a while later here it comes...steamed, 4 slices about 2" diameter and 1/2" thick...served with ponzu sauce and some greens. It was very much like liverwurst in texture and a bit in taste. I would have it again when it appears on the specials board.

The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

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Adam, when you come back to Florence, my fish mongers give me the liver for free.

when I have Japanese students I always go and get some.

I just do a quick sear and salt.

Will try the steaming version next time, although I get tiny livers.

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  • 1 year later...
Another name for monkfish liver is ankimo

a pictorial on one method of preparation

as for pate? that I never found ...  :rolleyes:

but I read that it is in the Nobu Cookbook ... :wink:

the preparation link is broken, is there another link?

The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

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  • 7 years later...

When I was in Brittany last time, I bought this monkfish liver (foie de lotte) in a jar. It's quite common to find this in Brittany btw.
 
I am not sure if it is cooked or ready to be consumed, probably it is. I don't read French and the text is too small!
 
Now, what would you do with this? Rather than using it as spread on bread :)

 

Make it as ballotine? 


Looking for a nice idea for dinner!

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22 hours ago, Josh71 said:

I am not sure if it is cooked or ready to be consumed, probably it is. I don't read French and the text is too small!

 

You are scaring me, but I hope you can get some help. You seem to be a good photographer, with your avatar of peas without wrinkles, which I remember you developing. There are a lot of French speakers on this site, so it you could catch the label in a shot, perhaps it could be enhanced to the point where someone can help you with what it says?

 

I remember someone saying that monkfish liver is the foie gras of the sea, but damned if I remember where I read it. Oh, and I do not think that anything can be safely canned or jarred without some sort of cooking. One can't even just chunk raw vegetables into a canning jar without some heat, unless you are raising the acid level and pickling them.

 

Here is the Google search page for monkfish liver:site egullet.org.

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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I never heard about monkfish liver, but here we have tinned cod liver. super fat, but super delicious. to add even more fat we eat on pn a slice of sourdough bread with butter and drizzle lemon on top. a very typical winter dish!

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I've only enjoyed monkfish liver or ankimo in Japanese restaurants.  So you could go that direction, keep it simple with steamed rice, ponzu, scallion.

 

 

10 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 monkfish liver is the foie gras of the sea ... Oh, and I do not think that anything can be safely canned or jarred without some sort of cooking.

 

Yes and yes!  Might be nice warmed up briefly, but further extended cooking should not be needed.

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