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phlip

Apricot Brandy: Apry, Etc.

121 posts in this topic

Not sure. She is supposed to email me the stores that will get it first in NYC when it leaves the warehouse, I can ask her to do the same for SF and I can let you know.

John


John Deragon

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I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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I've been having pretty good luck using Kassatly Kamardeen syrup and cognac in cocktails, as a substitute for actual apricot brandy. It's an apricot syrup from Lebanon and is available online or at Lebanese and Mediterannean markets.

I have a bottle of the Brizzard Poire William that I'm quite fond of too.


Katie M. Loeb
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Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

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Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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BREAKING NEWS ALERT....

I am sitting in pegu looking at a bottle of Apry. Of the cases that were floating around, Audrey now has a few in stock. Lenells is supposed to get some in stock as well.

Let the party begin!

I am going to stop by on Saturday to Lenells to see if they have it yet and I will report back.


John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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BREAKING NEWS ALERT....

I am sitting in pegu looking at a bottle of Apry. Of the cases that were floating around, Audrey now has a few in stock. Lenells is supposed to get some in stock as well.

Let the party begin!

I am going to stop by on Saturday to Lenells to see if they have it yet and I will report back.

Hmmm...

2:54 PM and you're at Pegu?

Have an Angel Face for me, you lucky duck.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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I am not that much of a lush. East coast time man. 5:54pm.

:biggrin:


John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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Lenells does in fact have Apry on the shelves for any of you in NYC.


John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

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I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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I've asked around and it sounds like Brizard Apry should be available soon in the Bay Area.

The general manager at the Plump Jack Wines Noe Valley Store said his distributor should have it in stock next week. Not sure if he's planning on stocking it in the store. He did look at me kind of strangely when I first asked about it, and say, "I don't get much call for Apricot-ey things". But, they're always happy to special order.


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Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Just an fyi for Boston folks, but Apry is available again! Just picked up my first bottle this week. Now, what to make first?!?!


Marty McCabe

Boston, MA

Acme Cocktail Company

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. . . Now, what to make first?!?!

I started with the recipe for the Paradise on the back of the bottle:

6 parts gin

3 parts Apry

1 part orange juice

It was way sweet. So I turned to Killer Cocktails, from which I extracted the Mike Romanoff:

2 ounces vodka

1 t Cointreau

1 t apricot brandy

3/4 oz lime juice

2 dashes Angostura bitters

Better. A lot better, but very tart. I liked it better at 1/2 oz. lime, though I agree with Wondrich that the bitters make a big difference (the original recipe didin't include them).

I then abandoned research. None of these are terribly sophisticated -- they're all derived from other cocktails -- but they're all tasty. The second is surprisingly complex.

Paradise Regained

From the Brizard recipe, I first went to lemon juice. It wasn't quite sharp enough, so I added bitters -- peach at first, then Peychaud's. Then one day, I had a half a lime and the bottle of Apry was already on the counter. No bitters necessary.

2 oz gin (Beefeater)

1/2 oz Apry

1/2 oz lime juice

I was on a roll. I'm still learning cocktails, and I decided that I could do worse than do what I did when I was learning how to play guitar: mimic the masters, and hope to find my own way eventually. Hence, the

Apricart

sugar-cinnamon rimmed glass (optional)

2 oz cognac (Landy)

scant 1/2 oz Apry

1/2 oz lemon juice

dash peach bitters (optional; I can't decide)

Then, maybe the best hard cider I've ever had.

Paracide

2 oz Applejack

1/2 oz Apry

1/2 oz lemon juice


Dave Scantland
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If you have some time on your hands, a freezer, and a willingness to flaunt the law, you could make true apricot brandy at home.

Start with pure apricot juice, freeze it slowly to remove water and increase the sugar concentration. Then add a cider yeast starter (available from a home brew store) and/or wine yeast and allow it to ferment for 3-6 months. At this point you'll have apricot wine.

Now proceed as if you were making applejack and just freeze it repeatedly, discarding any ice that forms until it stops forming. The final alcohol concentration will depend upon the temperature of your freezer. When you make applejack, most people can achieve 60 proof using the freezer.

As I noted above, I wouldn't tell the ATF if you do this as fractional crystallization is considered a form of distillation (i.e. technically a felony as if you were operating an illegal still). If you're sure the feds aren't going to raid your home, you should be fine though...

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Flatiron Lounge recently had a nice Apry drink on their menu called the "Slope" (presumably after Park Slope). It's similar to the Red Hook, only substituting Apry for the maraschino. The Red Hook is 2 rye and half each of Punt e Mes and maraschino. Since Apry is not as assertive as maraschino, you'll want to play with the ratios a bit to find out what works best.

Another cool cocktail for Apry is the Golden Dawn (equal parts Calvados, gin, Cointreau, Apry -- shake, strain, dribble in a little grenadine).

Apry would also be good as the sweet component of a Julep (I've been making gin juleps with St. Germain elderflower liqueur, but that's for another thread).


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Flatiron Lounge recently had a nice Apry drink on their menu called the "Slope" (presumably after Park Slope).  It's similar to the Red Hook, only substituting Apry for the maraschino.  The Red Hook is 2 rye and half each of Punt e Mes and maraschino.  Since Apry is not as assertive as maraschino, you'll want to play with the ratios a bit to find out what works best.

Another cool cocktail for Apry is the Golden Dawn (equal parts Calvados, gin, Cointreau, Apry -- shake, strain, dribble in a little grenadine). 

Apry would also be good as the sweet component of a Julep (I've been making gin juleps with St. Germain elderflower liqueur, but that's for another thread).

If I recall correctly (don't count on it!)...I think they told me the Slope was 2:1:1. It is a nice drink.

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If you have some time on your hands, a freezer, and a willingness to flaunt the law, you could make true apricot brandy at home.

Start with pure apricot juice, freeze it slowly to remove water and increase the sugar concentration.  Then add a cider yeast starter (available from a home brew store) and/or wine yeast and allow it to ferment for 3-6 months.  At this point you'll have apricot wine.

Now proceed as if you were making applejack and just freeze it repeatedly, discarding any ice that forms until it stops forming.  The final alcohol concentration will depend upon the temperature of your freezer.  When you make applejack, most people can achieve 60 proof using the freezer.

As I noted above, I wouldn't tell the ATF if you do this as fractional crystallization is considered a form of distillation (i.e. technically a felony as if you were operating an illegal still).  If you're sure the feds aren't going to raid your home, you should be fine though...

[il]legalities aside, I'd be more concerned about health impact. Fusel oils (types of congeners) produced during fermentation are removed by traditional evaporative distillation, but concentrated by fractional crystallization. Depending on the specifics, one could implicate freeze distillation in side effects from headaches to vomiting, or worse.

OTOH, impurities = flavors, and if we relentlessly pursued their elimination then it would be pure ethanol in our glasses. I don't know where the line is; perhaps someone more experienced in distillation can lend their knowledge?


David aka "DCP"

Amateur protein denaturer, Maillard reaction experimenter, & gourmand-at-large

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Home distillation of fruit sounds like an expensive hobby. And if you just use the apricot juice you won't get any of the characteristic tastes that come from the apricot stones. I'd stick to buying Apricot eau-de-vie or the comparable apricot fruit liqueur.

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I've been making what I call the Orchard Paradise -- Applejack, Apry, a splash of Maraschino, lemon juice and a dash of peach bitters. It's reminiscent of one of the sweeter hard ciders (it was also described as fruit salad in a glass, but in a very good way).


Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
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I've been making what I call the Orchard Paradise -- Applejack, Apry, a splash of Maraschino, lemon juice and a dash of peach bitters. It's reminiscent of one of the sweeter hard ciders (it was also described as fruit salad in a glass, but in a very good way).

i wonder if you could find a plum brandy and then you could take the stone fruit theme to the next level....


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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i wonder if you could find a plum brandy and then you could take the stone fruit theme to the next level....

Sounds delicious. About 9 months ago I was on a plum wine kick and picked up a bottle of every sort I could find. One in particular was knock-you-over strong, and we were positive it was actually mislabeled plum brandy. Never figured out what to do with it, and I'm fairly sure it was tossed during a kitchen re-organization.

Fairly sure I know which place it came from, and can hunt down the brand if you like.


David aka "DCP"

Amateur protein denaturer, Maillard reaction experimenter, & gourmand-at-large

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i wonder if you could find a plum brandy and then you could take the stone fruit theme to the next level....

Sounds delicious. About 9 months ago I was on a plum wine kick and picked up a bottle of every sort I could find. One in particular was knock-you-over strong, and we were positive it was actually mislabeled plum brandy. Never figured out what to do with it, and I'm fairly sure it was tossed during a kitchen re-organization.

Fairly sure I know which place it came from, and can hunt down the brand if you like.

Being the stickler kind of guy that I am, I will point out that what is typically labelled "Plum Wine" is not actually a fermented beverage made from Plums.

It is really a type of plum liqueur made by steeping whole plums in "white liquor" with sugar. Depending on the proof of the liquor you start with, you can have a real range of proof. Many of the commercial ones seem to be around 15% Alcohol. Homemade ones could be 30% (typical shochu) or higher.

Real "Plum Brandy" is typically called "Slivovitz", "Quetsch" or "Mirabelle". Clear Creek makes a nice slivovitz style Blue Plum Eau de Vie. It is similar in character to a Grappa or Kirsch.


Edited by eje (log)

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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If I'm not mistaken, Mirabellenbrand is made from yellow plums and Slivovitz from blue.

Having only had kind of nasty slivovitzes I'm not really in a position to say what sort of flavor difference that makes, if any, but I'd imagine it's rather subtle.

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Being the stickler kind of guy that I am, I will point out that what is typically labelled "Plum Wine" is not actually a fermented beverage made from Plums.

It is really a type of plum liqueur made by steeping whole plums in "white liquor" with sugar.  Depending on the proof of the liquor you start with, you can have a real range of proof.  Many of the commercial ones seem to be around 15% Alcohol.  Homemade ones could be 30% (typical shochu) or higher.

Real "Plum Brandy" is typically called "Slivovitz", "Quetsch" or "Mirabelle".  Clear Creek makes a nice slivovitz style Blue Plum Eau de Vie.  It is similar in character to a Grappa or Kirsch.

Interesting! That would certainly explain the flavor. Thanks for the details.


David aka "DCP"

Amateur protein denaturer, Maillard reaction experimenter, & gourmand-at-large

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so marie brizzard apry seems impossible to get these days and i'm irritated because i don't have an ingrediant i'm used to having. anyone have a apricot brandy in mind that is not disgustingly sweet and available in nyc.  thanks

i found some marie brizard apry today are girace wine and spirits in the north end.... that place is incredible by the way.... picked up some nardini amaro as well....


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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i wonder if you could find a plum brandy and then you could take the stone fruit theme to the next level....

The Charlie Chaplin Cocktail

1 part apricot brandy

1 part sloe gin

1 part lemon juice

A little weak to my taste but highly delicous.

(served on the rocks)


Edited by lynchu (log)

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i wonder if you could find a plum brandy and then you could take the stone fruit theme to the next level....

The Charlie Chaplin Cocktail

1 part apricot brandy

1 part sloe gin

1 part lemon juice

A little weak to my taste but highly delicous.

(served on the rocks)

substitute a robust london dry gin for the sloe gin. it makes for a stronger and more dry version of this cocktail.

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Flatiron Lounge recently had a nice Apry drink on their menu called the "Slope" (presumably after Park Slope).  It's similar to the Red Hook, only substituting Apry for the maraschino.  The Red Hook is 2 rye and half each of Punt e Mes and maraschino.  Since Apry is not as assertive as maraschino, you'll want to play with the ratios a bit to find out what works best.

If I recall correctly (don't count on it!)...I think they told me the Slope was 2:1:1.

Having found a bottle of Apry (for Bostonians, at Kappy's in Saugus/Revere) finally, I made a Slope following Sam's receipt:

2 oz rye (Wild Turkey 101)

1/2 oz Punt e Mes

1/2 oz MB Apry

I really liked it. I'm a Red Hook fan, but this brings out different dimensions of the rye than that drink. I can't imagine bumping up the PeM and Apry to 1 and 1 as Nathan suggests, though; it'd overpower the rye, at least for me.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

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I guess I need to get around to making this at home and see which way it was.

2:.5:.5 certainly would showcase the rye more.

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