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Addicted to Coke – the Kosher for Passover kind


ronnie_suburban
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Man! Last week a friend tipped me off to the glories of sucrose-sweetened Kosher-for-Passover Coca Cola and I've been guzzling it down ever since. The grocery store nearest my house has a big Kosher section and sure enough, they carry the KfP Coke (6 x 12 oz. cans) in their special, Passover section. I brought some home and just could not believe how great it tasted and what a difference sucrose makes over high-fructose corn syrup, which is used to sweeten standard Coca-Cola Classic.

I'm normally a caffeine-free diet coke drinker, but I've always had an appreciation for good old Coke "red," and will -- every once in a while -- indulge the craving. I only like it in cans, super chilled and then poured, a few sips at a time, over ice in a glass tumbler. This KfP stuff makes that ritual even more enjoyable than it normally is.

If you're a fan of Coke, and live in an area where there is opportunity, I cannot encourage you strongly enough to try the KfP Coke for yourself. Drinking this stuff really takes me back to my earliest days with pop. It brought to mind memories of things I hadn't thought of in years, like the pop machine at the florist that was about a block away from the house where I grew up. We used to save our change (or pester our folks) and walk over the machine for cans of coke. The minute I tasted this stuff, it brought me back there. Pretty cool.

Anyway, I must have sucked down 3 or 4 of these babies today when it struck me that I was seriously depleting my inventory. No worries, I headed back to the store and picked up a case (expy date 12/06). I actually thought about buying more but decided that it would be overkill. With a case on hand I can indulge myself a bit longer, share a few cans with friends and, eventually, look forward to next year's batch. My newest Passover tradition! :biggrin:

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

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ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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The stuff they make now with high fructose corn syrup is NOTHING like what I remember from my youth. But I disagree with you about one thing, =R=: The coke sold in the little small glass bottles is WAY better than what's sold in cans! :biggrin: (And I mean that in the nicest way.) Of course, a 6-pack is 10 times more expensive than a 6-pack of cans. Maybe they don't want the word to get out?

You've inspired me to run out and get some KfP coke while it's still available!

Thanks!

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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The stuff they make now with high fructose corn syrup is NOTHING like what I remember from my youth.  But I disagree with you about one thing, =R=:  The coke sold in the little small glass bottles is WAY better than what's sold in cans!  :biggrin: (And I mean that in the nicest way.)  Of course, a 6-pack is 10 times more expensive than a 6-pack of cans.  Maybe they don't want the word to get out?

You've inspired me to run out and get some KfP coke while it's still available!

Thanks!

If you mean the Coke sold year round (made with corn syrup) in the little glass bottles is better than the year round Coke in cans, I'd agree. If you mean the corn syrup Coke in little glass bottles is better than the K for P sugar coke in cans, I disagree. The sugar Coke, to me, is always better than the corn syrup Coke.

=R= - Consider yourself lucky to find the Coke in six-pack cans. I've never seen it the D.C./Baltimore area in anything except VERY inconvenient 2 liter bottles. I have seen it in New York and also in Pittsburgh, but for whatever reason, Coke chooses to not distribute the cans in the D.C. area :sad:

Thanks,

Kevin

DarkSide Member #005-03-07-06

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KP Coca Cola is one of the best things about Passover. It means Spring! I tried that Coke Blak last week, but it was loaded with a corn syrup taste. Too bad, the ginger aftertaste in Coca Cola is perfect with coffee.

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The stuff they make now with high fructose corn syrup is NOTHING like what I remember from my youth.  But I disagree with you about one thing, =R=:  The coke sold in the little small glass bottles is WAY better than what's sold in cans!  :biggrin: (And I mean that in the nicest way.)  Of course, a 6-pack is 10 times more expensive than a 6-pack of cans.  Maybe they don't want the word to get out?

You've inspired me to run out and get some KfP coke while it's still available!

Thanks!

I love those little bottles and can occasionally find them around but they seem to usually be the HFCS formula. A gourmet store (can you say irony?) in Chicago carries Mexican-made (with cane sugar) Coke in 12-oz. bottles. But they're about $3 each and the place is quite far from my house.

These KfP cans have been such a treat.

Mel, thanks for the link!

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Its funny, more than anything else I have posted on Off The Broiler since I started it, This particular entry seems to get more attention than anything else.

I agree that KFP Coke is the bomb, although I prefer Mexican coke, since it comes in glass bottles. However, at 99 cents per two liter, you cant beat KFP coke.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Thanks for the link, Jason. I tried but couldn't find it when I was starting this thread. And thanks again for the tip. This stuff is truly delightful.

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Ronnie, I'm actually quite jealous that you have access to the KFP Coke from Chicago. The OU sponsored KFP Coke we get in the NY/NJ area is only readily avaliable in 2-liter bottles. In Chicago, Passover Coke is overseen by the Chicago Rabbinical Council (cRc), and they've been making a lot of it in cans. The 2-Liters go flat after about 3 months, whereas cans can last six months at the very least.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I read Jason Perlow's link to his blog re: sucrose versus fructose since 1985, and that kfP coke is just the original formula.  My question is, how does the kfP Coke differ from "Coke Classic"?

Coke Classic is made with corn syrup, while KfP is Coke Classic made with sugar. I don't believe just plain Coke exists anymore. That was the horrible drink they came out with in 1985 when they switched from sugar to corn syrup. Soon enough, they had both Coke and Coke Classic. Over time, plain old Coke went away (I haven't read Jason's blog, but it likely says the same thing.)

Thanks,

Kevin

DarkSide Member #005-03-07-06

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Jason:  I'd disagree with one thing in your blog, "sucrose" is the sugar extracted from both cane and beets.  Your blog indicates it is from sugar beets only.

---Guy

My understanding is that Coca-Cola of Hawthorne, NY, who makes the OU KFP stuff for the Northeast, uses beet sugar, not Cane sugar. Cane sugar is a very expensive ingredient and it has other residual compounds in it to give it that "caney" flavor besides just the Sucrose that is processed.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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After reading this thread, I picked up a couple of bottles today, and it's fabulous! My husband couldn't understand what the big deal was, until he tried it. Now he's raving about it!

(And we're not even Jewish...)

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Jason:  I'd disagree with one thing in your blog, "sucrose" is the sugar extracted from both cane and beets.  Your blog indicates it is from sugar beets only.

---Guy

Does anyone know for sure, whether the KfP Coke is made with cane sugar or with beet sugar? Important to know for people allergic to beet sugar. Thanks.

Edited for afterthought. :-)

Edited by azlee (log)
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In the Northeast United States, its Beet. The cRc in Chicago might use something different than what the OU uses with the stuff made in New York, but I doubt it. The Northeast KFP Coke made by Coca-Cola Bottling of Hawthorne is also distributed to other cities in the US as well.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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The stuff they make now with high fructose corn syrup is NOTHING like what I remember from my youth.  But I disagree with you about one thing, =R=:  The coke sold in the little small glass bottles is WAY better than what's sold in cans!  :biggrin: (And I mean that in the nicest way.)  Of course, a 6-pack is 10 times more expensive than a 6-pack of cans.  Maybe they don't want the word to get out?

You've inspired me to run out and get some KfP coke while it's still available!

Thanks!

If you mean the Coke sold year round (made with corn syrup) in the little glass bottles is better than the year round Coke in cans, I'd agree. If you mean the corn syrup Coke in little glass bottles is better than the K for P sugar coke in cans, I disagree. The sugar Coke, to me, is always better than the corn syrup Coke.

=R= - Consider yourself lucky to find the Coke in six-pack cans. I've never seen it the D.C./Baltimore area in anything except VERY inconvenient 2 liter bottles. I have seen it in New York and also in Pittsburgh, but for whatever reason, Coke chooses to not distribute the cans in the D.C. area :sad:

Thanks,

Kevin

No No No! What I meant was that the coke sold in glass bottles is better than that sold in plastic and cans. And that coke made with cane sugar is way WAY better than that made with high fructose corn syrup! Hope this clears up my position on the matter. :biggrin:

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I've heard about the Coke for Passover before, but never came across it untill about 2 weeks ago. I made an effort to find it this year and found a Shop Rite in Elizabeth, N.J. that carries it. I bought a 2 liter bottle and a 1.5 liter bottle of the regular Coke without the sugar. After the bottles were cold enough, I compared the 2 versions side by side. I was disappointed to discover that I actually prefer the coke with the high fructose corn syrup. Probably because I've been drinking it since 1985. The kosher coke tasted a little too sweet for me.

John the hot dog guy

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We usually travel to Telluride, Co every summer, where my teenage son turned me onto Mexican Coke, made with cane sugar. It sent me back to my childhood days. But last summer when we were there the ingredient list said "cane sugar or corn syrup" so I thought I would be forever without it.

Now that I know about Kfp Coke, I will start looking for it and stock up. When my son comes home from college he'll be delighted.

We aren't Jewish, but the whole family waits for Passover each year so we can buy whole wheat matzah, which isn't otherwise available anywhere I shop. Now we have 2 reasons to celebrate the holiday.

Thanks!

Eileen

Eileen Talanian

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Thanks for the great tip, Ronnie! I picked up a 2-liter tonight at my local grocery store. I like it a lot, and I hardly ever drink soda. (Even after 30+ years in Michigan I still feel silly calling it "pop.") For lack of a better term, it tastes cleaner than other colas I've tried, with no unpleasant aftertaste.

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I've heard about the Coke for Passover before, but never came across it untill about 2 weeks ago. I made an effort to find it this year and found a Shop Rite in Elizabeth, N.J. that carries it. I bought a 2 liter bottle and a 1.5 liter bottle of the regular Coke without the sugar. After the bottles were cold enough, I compared the 2 versions side by side. I was disappointed to discover that I actually prefer the coke with the high fructose corn syrup. Probably because I've been drinking it since 1985. The kosher coke tasted a little too sweet for me.

That's odd, John. HFCS is actually supposed to be sweeter than Sucrose. You sure you didn't switch the caps? :laugh:

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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No, I didn't switch the caps, but the kosher coke did taste sweeter to me both times I compared the 2. Maybe it's less carbonated than the high fructose version and that makes it seem sweeter? I was surprised that the kosher coke, which I would assume costs more to make because sugar is more expensive, was actually cheaper.

John the hot dog guy

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Sometimes there are good sales on the 2-Liters. I've seen them as low as 89 cents.

2-Liter is not my preferred container for buying soda, though. I prefer cans simply because you can go six months or more on the carbonation, whereas 2-Liters are limited to 3 or 4 months tops. And once you open a 2-Liter you pretty much have to drink it all within 24 hours or it goes flat.

KFP Coke definitely has a different mouthfeel than regular HFCS coke. One of the reasons HFCS is liked by soda manufacturers, other than the fact that it is cheap, is that its very consistent in how it behaves, it won't foam up. Sugar syrup, which is a combination of sucrose and water, will actually "foam up" and give you a "head" on your soda if you pour it in ice, plus it affects the viscosity of the liquid and also the size of the bubbles -- You'll notice the bubbles are smaller on a sucrose-based soda as well. That's part of the old-time flavor and behavior people are looking for in a sugar soda.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I'm sitting here with my KFP Coca Cola, very happy! I've had to budget the calories of the soda into my diet, I'm drinking so much! I haven't been able to find that CokeBlak in a KFP version, too bad.

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