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adegiulio

Steam ovens

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I couldn't get much technical information from the Wolf site regarding this oven.

For years, there have been many commercial convection ovens with a "steam' feature. But this is not true steam...

For pro Euro-bakeries and many Chinese bakeries, the ovens (or steamers) are fitted with a box that generates steam. This operates independent of the oven and belches clouds of steam into the oven cavity. These units consume a lot of power to convert water to steam. Most of the Euro-bakers use the steam in 2 or 3 10 second blasts and then no more for that bake.

What the commercial convection ovens (but NOT including the Rational ovens) have, is a water line connected to a solenoid. Press a button and water is squirted onto the squirell cage fan of the oven. Tiny droplets of water are flung all over the oven cavity. However, you need energy to convert water into steam. The energy comes from the oven's walls. You will get steam but at a cost--lower oven temps. It will take the oven some time to get back up to temperature again.

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RE: Baking Bread

I have on several occasions with good success. However, I have never done a side-by-side with my gas viking range oven.

Mike

...edited to direct the response....


Edited by Msk (log)

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For about thirteen years I had a Blodgett convection/steam oven for my catering needs.

It held 10 full-size sheet pans and also had 5 wire racks. It was like this one, except both doors had glass.

I stopped doing commercial baking and let my commercial kitchen certification expire and no longer had any use for the oven, which used a lot of gas. (Required a bigger gas line) so eventually I sold it to a friend who has a small bakery/cafe.

There are several manufacturers that make similar ovens and they are designed to take a beating. I bought mine at an auction - a TV studio that produced cooking shows was moving and simply put all the appliances and fixtures (also bought two SS tables) into the auction.

It was used but not as much as in a commercial kitchen and was ideal for me.

No matter where you live, you should be able to find a reliable dealer that carries used equipment where you can get a better deal than buying a new one.

One of the advantages of using steam while cooking or baking is that aromas and flavors do not intermingle. Many times I baked savory tarts, etc., at the same time as sweet things, cheesecakes, pies, tarts, and with no crossover flavors.

I was suspicious of this when I read it in the Blodgett manual but that's the way it worked. I recently saw a blurb about the Miele steam oven with the same notes.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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RE: Baking Bread

I have on several occasions with good success. However, I have never done a side-by-side with my gas viking range oven.

Mike

...edited to direct the response....

As far as you could tell, the crust came out the same?

My concern is I'm used to throwing a cup of hot water onto a half cookie sheet placed on the bottom of the pre-heated oven to get a blast of steam, when first putting the dough in.

And the Wolf bread recipe says do not pre-heat.

I'm wondering how the recipes will turn out?


Edited by Aloha Steve (log)

edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

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My memory is that it was an improvment over a dry oven, but how much over an oven with "Simulated steam" like you tried is uncertain.

My gaggenau has a "steam burst" button so thats what I used. The wolf might be worried youd lose all the steam if you pre heated and all the steam comes in the beginning.

Mike

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Does anyone bake bread with your steam oven?

I've done a few loaves with the Gaggenau steam oven. I've used two methods depending on how substantial I want the crust to be.

One way is to preheat the oven on the 100% steam setting, and then after 3-10 minutes (depending on how long you think steam is important in the baking of breads) turn it to 0% steam so it vents the humidity. This did make a decent crust.

For a heartier crust, I've be able to add even more steam by first doing the '100% steam' setting with preheat, then putting the bread in, switching the oven to 0% and then holding the mist button [this button is not available when the oven is set to 100% steam] to add more, and switching it back to 100% steam for some minutes, and then back to 0% to finish off.

In either case, I preheat with a cast iron platter dusted with flour or cornmeal, but there are some stones that fit the Gaggenau steam oven (e.g. the American Metalcraft Stone12 fits). The Gaggenau does top out at 450F.

Here's a pic of a loaf of 5-minute-a-day bread baking in the steam oven:

IMG_20120218_233341.jpg

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. . . .

In either case, I preheat with a cast iron platter dusted with flour or cornmeal, but there are some stones that fit the Gaggenau steam oven (e.g. the American Metalcraft Stone12 fits). The Gaggenau does top out at 450F.

. . . .

There's also Gaggenau's own stone, but it's not cheap, and I have some doubts about it (although again, I wouldn't say no to a free one).


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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There's also Gaggenau's own stone, but it's not cheap, and I have some doubts about it (although again, I wouldn't say no to a free one).

Is that a new accessory for the Gaggenau steam oven or are you thinking of the stone (plus extra heating element) they sell for their regular convection oven? The interior of the steam oven is much smaller than the regular ovens, so it couldn't be used in the steam oven. (nor does the steam oven have the port for the extra heating element that works with their baking stone and roaster accessory).

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There's also Gaggenau's own stone, but it's not cheap, and I have some doubts about it (although again, I wouldn't say no to a free one).

Is that a new accessory for the Gaggenau steam oven or are you thinking of the stone (plus extra heating element) they sell for their regular convection oven? The interior of the steam oven is much smaller than the regular ovens, so it couldn't be used in the steam oven. (nor does the steam oven have the port for the extra heating element that works with their baking stone and roaster accessory).

Yes, the stone for their regular oven. When we spoke with a rep., he said that the effect of a stone in a steam oven was found to be too insignificant to warrant their making a version for the steam units (I'm hypothesising that this has something to do with the overall lower temperature when the oven is full of steam.).


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Yes, the stone for their regular oven. When we spoke with a rep., he said that the effect of a stone in a steam oven was found to be too insignificant to warrant their making a version for the steam units (I'm hypothesising that this has something to do with the overall lower temperature when the oven is full of steam.).

Because of the humidity settings, the wet bulb temperature in the Gaggenau combi oven set at high humidity will be higher than in a dry oven. I haven't done it yet, but after seeing the wet bulb curves in Modernist Cuisine for the Rational combi oven, I've wanted to measure and plot them for my Gaggenau combi oven for comparison and to see how variable Gagg's temp control is. I'm partially hoping someone will beat me to it, though, so I won't feel the need to rig up equipment.

In any case, I get much higher oven spring when placing the dough onto the preheated cast iron pan than onto a thin pan. A stone should behave similarly.

The Gagg accessories are very overpriced, so it's no big deal if they don't have a stone for the steam oven. The stone I listed is less than $10 (though as I mentioned, I already had an iron platter that fit). Also, standard hotel pans (1/3, 1/2, and 2/3 sizes) fit on the steam oven rails and can be found in any restaurant supply shop for around $10 each.

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