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wilsonrabbit

Adagio has gone to market

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I was in my local A&P supermarket today, passed through the tea aisle and lo and behold, I saw a familiar label. Adagio Tea! On the shelf was Wu Yi Oolong and Aristocrat Earl Grey. Not exactly the same tea names on their internet site so who knows if it's better or worse or the same but with a name change for some legal reason or what not. I'm assuming it's fairly fresh being that Clifton (their warehouse and home base) is relatively local. How long it's been on the shelf...er...wish they had a "packed" date. :raz: Anyhow, I think it was a 4 oz container and the unit price was $39.96/lb (I think) but $9.96 (or so) for the container. I didn't really pay that much attention, but I do believe it was the same price for both.

Too bad I didn't look to see whether Whole Foods was carrying them because I made a pit stop there too. I don't believe any of my other local markets are carrying them. Either way, they must be aggressively pursuing the American market by starting locally first (or is this a nationwide venture?).

Has anyone seen them in their local markets and tried it? I'm wondering whether it really is on par with the "fresh" stuff via mail and whether it's even the same. I have not ordered their wu yi or earl grey yet. I have too much tea to warrant the supermarket purchase. I'm trying to control myself because I always buy more than I can drink. Don't ask...

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Ah, I found a little article in their media section of their website that talks about this. Not sure when the release of the article was. Looks like they're actually 5 oz containers, not 4 and there's more than just 2 types out there (not surprised there) and so there's a big range in pricing. It was also interesting to read about their packaging which is a clear plastic container. The type with those snap lids. Similar to their metal ones online in design. Anyhow, I was surprised (but delighted) that I could see the tea itself and they mention how their plastic blocks the UV rays that would otherwise degrade the tea. Hence no other brands sell teas that you can see. So, it seems this is a nationwide push. I wonder whether the other online tea purveyors will also dive into the foray.

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