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Pink Pastry Boxes


Carolyn Tillie
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  • 11 months later...

Hi, all. I was just wondering if anyone had any information on pink pastry boxes. Specifically, I'm trying to find out why pastry boxes are always shown as pink on t.v. and in movies when, in reality, they are usually white. (I've only seen a pink box, in person, once in my entire life!). :rolleyes:

If anyone can shed any light on this for me, I would really appreciate it.

Thanks!

Roberta

:cool:

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I've seen them in a few places around the country. It's true you don't see them often but then they are more expensive I'm sure.

It does beg the question as to why there aren't a whole lot of other colors though.

Obviously for tv, movies etc. it "shows" better using a color than boring old white.

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Your post reminded me of a previous topic on this same vexing question. :smile:

Pink Pastry Boxes... Why?

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I didn't see that earlier thread, but there is no mystery at all to why pink became the traditional color of pastry boxes - the tradition starting during the reign of Louis XIV, le Roi Soleil in France when the mark of success for any patissierie was a royal license, that always stamped in pink and the color being taken on by pastry shops throughout France as a sign of their increased "status".

It should be noted that during the French Revolution the color almost vanished from sight, no-one wanting to be associated in such a blatant way with royalty. that might have been too quick a way to the guillotine! The color made its comeback in the late 18th century and at least in part of Europe (e.g. France, Belgium, Monte Carlo, Italy, and parts of Germany and Austria) being associated even today with quality pastry shops.

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... It's true you don't see them often but then they are more expensive I'm sure...

I think this was discussed in the previous thread -- that the pink boxes are more standard here in California than in the rest of the country -- but as a general rule, the pink boxes are flimsier and LESS expensive, the white much more substantial, so I always used to purchase the heavier white boxes, until Restaurant Depot quit carrying them!

Personally, I think that pink is just gawd-awful! And I think a little originality in packaging is needed. Baker & Spice in London have fabulous new packaging in a gorgeous, rich orange with black. http://bakerandspice.jhadmin.net/default.asp?section=160 How about a buttery-yellow box with chocolate brown ribbon/string? Coffee-colored box? Something a little more appetizing than that horrid pink!!

kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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I didn't see that earlier thread, but there is no mystery at all to why pink became the traditional color of pastry boxes - the tradition starting during the reign of Louis XIV, le Roi Soleil in France when the mark of success for any patissierie was a royal license, that always stamped in pink and the color being taken on by pastry shops throughout France as a sign of their increased "status".

...

Interesting history, Daniel. Thank you very much for sharing it.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I didn't see that earlier thread, but there is no mystery at all to why pink became the traditional color of pastry boxes - the tradition starting during the reign of Louis XIV, le Roi Soleil in France when the mark of success for any patissierie was a royal license, that always stamped in pink and the color being taken on by pastry shops throughout France as a sign of their increased "status".

It should be noted that during the French Revolution the color almost vanished from sight, no-one wanting to be associated in such a blatant way with royalty. that might have been too quick a way to the guillotine!  The color made its comeback  in the late 18th century and at least in part of Europe (e.g. France, Belgium, Monte Carlo, Italy, and parts of Germany and Austria) being associated even today with quality pastry shops.

Thank you! :wub:

I love learning things like that.

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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Thanks very much, Daniel. Is there a particular source where you got that information? I'd like to read up some more on it, if I can.

And thanks, Ludja, for bringing the other thread to my attention. I should have done a search on the topic. I just figured that it's such a strange little topic, who else would have asked about it? I should never assume, right? :biggrin:

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...

And thanks, Ludja, for bringing the other thread to my attention. I should have done a search on the topic. I just figured that it's such a strange little topic, who else would have asked about it? I should never assume, right?  :biggrin:

I'm positive I wouldn't have searched to see if that had been discussed before either! :smile:

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I didn't see that earlier thread, but there is no mystery at all to why pink became the traditional color of pastry boxes - the tradition starting during the reign of Louis XIV, le Roi Soleil in France when the mark of success for any patissierie was a royal license, that always stamped in pink and the color being taken on by pastry shops throughout France as a sign of their increased "status".

It should be noted that during the French Revolution the color almost vanished from sight, no-one wanting to be associated in such a blatant way with royalty. that might have been too quick a way to the guillotine!  The color made its comeback  in the late 18th century and at least in part of Europe (e.g. France, Belgium, Monte Carlo, Italy, and parts of Germany and Austria) being associated even today with quality pastry shops.

I see that lots of folks have already thanked you for this post, but I found it quite interesting, too, and wanted to add my appreciative thanks as well.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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My goodness... is this a California thing?

I get pink boxes at all my local donut shops and bakeries (except Bouchon, of course, which has its own signature boxes with weird green ribbons). Only occasionally do I get white ones, but they always seem to be pink...

No in Colorado too we have pink, I had the misfortune to work in a chain store bakery and they have them pink ( for doughnuts too)

I dont recall ever seen a pink box in Italy , they usually put pasties in trays and wrap them with paper ( usually each bakery has their company name on it ) and close it with ribbons ,for cakes and pies the most common ia a box made of one piece that usually goes together on the top umm. not really clear , like these ones;

http://www.scatolificiosilca.it/it/pasticceria.asp

Edited by Desiderio (log)

Vanessa

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Paris boxes (should this mean France has learned anything from its Revolution?):

Pierre Hermé - white boxes with one coloured side (red/yellow/etc)

Sadaharu Aoki - white boxes with the name in silver, almost unperceptible

Fauchon - black & white, as their logo

Ladurée - the non-gift boxes are light green with violet decors, gift boxes have several colours and designs

Gerard Mullot - the only pink boxes I've found in Paris

Edited by filipe (log)

Filipe A S

pastry student, food lover & food blogger

there's allways room for some more weight

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