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Pam R

eG Foodblog: Pam R - or Pam's Passover Plotz (Part 2)

168 posts in this topic

Good Morning!

Evidence #1 that spring is officially here - this picture taken from my kitchen window this morning:

gallery_25849_641_12931.jpg

That's right. The Canada Geese have come home.

Evidence #2 - Passover starts Wednesday night. And I'm tired.

Some of you may recall that I blogged last year . You can read up on last years events over here. (in case you missed it :wink: )

This year many things will be quite similar to last year. I'll be in the kitchen baking and cooking most of the same items, probably going to the same restaurants for a quick dinner in the next few days. On the other hand, the family business has changed quite a lot since last April - so I'll share with you how I spend my time at work when not in the kitchen. And between now and the end of the week I need to get a couple of recipe columns in.

As I share with you, I'm happy to answer whatever questions you may have. I might have some questions for you too - so let's get started!

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Even though y'all didn't know I was blogging last night - I did. So here's dinner:

gallery_25849_641_16392.jpg

I wanted to share dinner with you for a couple of reasons. First of all, it was good. But also, it's the first 'real meal' I had all week. My mother took pity on the rest of the family and left work early (6:30) to make dinner for the rest of us. I arrived at about 7:45, just before sunset (or just before Shabbat started) and dinner was waiting.

All week it's been grabbing fast food or a sandwich at about 8:30 at night - so it was nice to have a home-cooked Shabbat dinner. Barbecued rib steak, mushrooms and zucchini, each sauteed in olive oil with garlic and a rice pilaf.

I'm going to grab something light for breakfast and get ready to head out.

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Chag Pesach Sameach Pam!!!

Yeah, your blogging again.

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Hi Pam!

I really enjoyed your blog last year and look forward to spending Passover with you! You are very brave to blog (again) at such a busy time. I'm sure I'm not the only one to feel honoured that you are willing to donate your time so generously.

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Hello Pam! How do you manage such energy? Kiddle says it is because you can eat a cookie whenever you want! :raz: We both adore you here! So glad to see you blogging for us, we always enjoy watching you in the kitchen.


Edited by Rebecca263 (log)

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Yay, you're blogging again! I quote liked last year's, and I'm sure this one will be just as good.

One thing I really enjoyed in your first blog was reading about the way food comes into religion (Judaism in your case) - always fascinating for an ignorant agnostic like myself. :smile:


Cutting the lemon/the knife/leaves a little cathedral:/alcoves unguessed by the eye/that open acidulous glass/to the light; topazes/riding the droplets,/altars,/aromatic facades. - Ode to a Lemon, Pablo Neruda

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Ahhhh ... so this is what my co-forum-host has been up to! :raz:

Blogging during Passover AGAIN? Obviously the winter in Manitoba wasn't cold enough to freeze some sense into yo this year!

Good luck. I'll hold down the fort!

A.

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:wub: Thanks folks.

I'm happy to be blogging again - but I'm not sure where the energy is coming from! We'll see what happens :wink: . I hope you all enjoy.

Breakfast. I love fruit. Breakfast is usually some fruit - on it's own or with something else. Often it's eaten in the car on the way to work :blink: . Today was the first day in a while I've taken the time to flip through the newspaper while having breakfast - and I took the time to make myself a little fruit salad. The strawberries were tasteless (I know - they usually are - but I can't stop myself from buying them -- and sometimes they surprise you) but everything else was great - especially the blueberries.

Next to the bowl of fruit, on a lovely serving dish, a piece of spelt matzo lightly buttered. There are some people who will not eat matzo before Passover. I obviously, do. I actually have a slight gluten-intolerance. So while I do eat some foods with gluten in them - never in the morning. The spelt matzo is one of the best breakfast items I've found in a long time, so there you go.

gallery_25849_641_16592.jpg

PS: Anybody find something better than papertowel for their matzo? :biggrin:

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Blogging during Passover AGAIN?  Obviously the winter in Manitoba wasn't cold enough to freeze some sense into yo this year!

:biggrin: It takes a lot more than -20 C to knock some sense into this 'toban!

Thanks :wink:

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I'm off to run some (non-food related) errands that have been piling up.

Let me leave you with some links - in case you want some information and explanations about Passover and/or Kashrut.

First of all - if you've seen the movie The Ten Commandments, then you know the basic story of Passover (well, the Hollywood version).

For more... actual explanation, try these:

Judaism 101's Passover page

or the Chabad.org 's site

For Kashrut (or Kosher):

Judaism 101 again - but Kashrut this time

or the OU's website

And don't forget, there are so many wonderful sources here at eGullet - here are just a few:

Passover, the thread

How-To Seder Guide

Passover Seder Menus

Matzo Brei and Matzo Brei

Passover Wines

and if you have questions that you've always been afraid to ask about this crazy kosher thing, go here

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I really am leaving now - when I return I'll fill you in on what's been going on the last couple of weeks - and what will be happening in the next few days.

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Have you heard about the new easy-to-break matza? Matzot Aviv, LTD.is introducing in the US.

They are also selling tinned matza that has artwork by Reuven Rubin and Menashe Kadishman on it.


Edited by Swisskaese (log)

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Hi Pam! I'm glad to see you are blogging again. It was your blog last year that got me hooked on egullet blogs and made me a daily visitor. Have a great and delicious week and I will look forward to following along!


Erin Andersen

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Have you heard about the new easy-to-break matza? Matzot Aviv, LTD.is introducing in the US.

They are also selling tinned matza that has artwork by Reuven Rubin and Menashe Kadishman on it.

Michelle - I haven't seen those - but I love it! I was talking to somebody yesterday about the new Savion Matzo Sticks. We were wondering why somebody needs to buy sticks... matzo boards are already perforated for easy breaking. And we asked the question "Is this a new product that we need?

Having said that - I find the spelt matzo breaks much better than plain matzo :raz:

And I haven't seen the tins.. I kind of like them.

More on matzo later...

Hi Pam!  I'm glad to see you are blogging again.  It was your blog last year that got me hooked on egullet blogs and made me a daily visitor.  Have a great and delicious week and I will look forward to following along!

:wub: Aren't the blogs fantastic? I enjoy them tremendously and participating is such fun. Thanks.

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Pam, you're a glutton for punishment, aren't you? I hope it isn't the "Jewish guilt" thing. :laugh:

Seriously, have a wonderful blog and a great Pesach. I'll be in motion part of the upcoming week, but I'll try my best to keep up with you.

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Quick question re the "bitter herbs" we read about in the Exodus account of the first Passover feast. I've heard it was horseradish. Is it so?

I'm teaching an Exodus 101 class for ladies in our congregation. Tomorrow, coincidentally, we'll be studying this section of Exodus. When I teach this to children, I usually bring roasted lamb chop torn into bits, pita bread (I realize not at all authentic but it looks much like bread from the time), and a mixture of dried herbs for them to touch a moist finger to and taste. We "eat" (taste) standing up, with our shoes on our feet, ready to leave Egypt!

For the children, I've always just given them the lamb at room temp, which is less than appetizing to me but never seemed to bother them. For the ladies, I wish I could have it heated, but can't think how to keep such a small amount hot without turning it to leather. I have shoulder chops, which shouldn't dry out so much, maybe, but I could use ideas. My crockpot is a 6 qt and they'd be lost in there, though maybe I could put the bites of meat in a little foil pan, cover with foil and set that in the warm crockpot. What does anybody think?


~ Lori in PA

My blog: http://inmykitcheninmylife.blogspot.com/

My egullet blog: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=89647&hl=

"Cooking is not a chore, it is a joy."

- Julia Child

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Pam, you're a glutton for punishment, aren't you? I hope it isn't the "Jewish guilt" thing. :laugh:

Who me? :wink:

Quick question re the "bitter herbs" we read about in the Exodus account of the first Passover feast.  I've heard it was horseradish.  Is it so?

This link to the OU dicusses this. According to the link, romaine lettuce is the #1 choice (stalk over leaf). Of course, there's more than one choice (5 vegetables that can be used).

As for the lamb .. how long does it need to keep warm?

I'm off for dinner - be back later.

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I am looking forward to this blog, Passover is such an interesting holiday for those of us who didn't grow up with it, and, in my opinion the food plays a different role than it plays in most other holidays, which I also find interesting.

By the way, spelt actually does have gluten! It's not considered safe for people with celiac disease, although it is tolerated by many people who are allergic to wheat Maybe you have a wheat intolerance if it is OK with your system.

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Kol ha Kavod, Pam, on doing a blog in the midst of one of the most labor-intensive Jewish holidays yet! :biggrin:


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Pam, thanks for blogging again, I truly enjoyed last year's blog. You have such energy!


If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

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Kol ha Kavod, Pam, on doing a blog in the midst of one of the most labor-intensive Jewish holidays yet!  :biggrin:

Thanks! I need all the strength I can get.

By the way, spelt actually does have gluten!  It's not considered safe for people with celiac disease, although it is tolerated by many people who are allergic to wheat  Maybe you have a wheat intolerance if it is OK with your system.

The box of matzo says it contains a different form of gluten. :blink: All I know is that I seem to be able to eat it. I have a customer who is always looking for things for her husband who suffers from celiac disease - she was going to bake him some matzo using potato starch. If I see her again before Wednesday I'll ask her how it worked out.

You have such energy!

You keep telling me that and maybe I'll believe it! :biggrin:

The energy is ... deteriorating. I just keep chanting "only 4 more days only four more days only four..." And then I'll collapse!

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Hey Pam! Looking forward to seeing photos of your new business. Oh dear, I see on the news that the Red River is rising again. Hope you are high and dry!

Zuke


"I used to be Snow White, but I drifted."

--Mae West

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So. A lot has changed in the last year.

We've moved our business across the city - we had to follow our customers. We've also (tried) to change our focus. We no longer have a restaurant and we were trying to get away from heavy-duty catering. We wanted to build our retail business. For a few years now, we've been bringing in kosher meats and dairy products and selling them out of our store, as well as supplying local hotels and synagogues.

With our move, we wanted to fill a need in the area we moved to. Hard to get kosher products, prepared foods and some catering. The move has been great. We're all exhausted but business is booming.

This week I'm going to show you some of the things we're preparing for Passover, I'll take you on a tour of the new store and I hope to be able to get a little home cooking in after the craziness of the next few days is over.

On Monday I have something planned - but I'll wait for it to be done before sharing (assuming it goes well).

I'll be back with dinner in a few minutes.

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Hey Pam! Looking forward to seeing photos of your new business. Oh dear, I see on the news that the Red River is rising again. Hope you are high and dry!

Pictures to come!

And I think we'll be ok here. I lived in Northern Minnesota when the Red flooded back in '97. It was a nightmare. But I believe the river crested today - and they opened the floodway to divert the water a couple of days ago. A few areas are having issues but we're dry here.

Hi Pam! I too salute your chutzpah in blogging while gearing up for Pesach, both at at home and at work, for a second year in a row.

Chutzpah and guilt! That pretty much sums it up!

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