Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

recommend a type of wine for me


chef koo
 Share

Recommended Posts

In my recent experience, a nice aromatic, preferably a riesling (Australian) would go well. the spice notes in a gewurtztraminer would also work well.

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

-earthy but fruity, with perhaps some mineral content

This could describe a nice Loire Cab Franc as well though the Rhone will be easier to find. I'm enjoying a glass of reasonably priced Baudry Chinon right now that would work. I have another Chinon (Pierre Breton) that a sales guy at Kermit Lynch said was a popular match at the Slanted Door in San Francisco for their Nouvelle take on Vietnamese food. Nice acid as well which I like with food.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm thinking two schools of thought. If the Asian influence is strong go with an Alsatian Gewurztraminer (rich textures, alcohols, and body) to stand upto the dish. PCL's recommend of an Australian Riesling would be on my short list as well.The other school of thought is to go with a complex red such as the Terra Alta Portal available for $22.99 at the Alberni BCLDB. It is a blend of Cab, Merlot, Syrah, and Tempanillo from a small region near the very trendy and expensive Priorat DO inland from Barcelona. This red has a wonderful subtle minty element that would compliment your dish.

Cheers,

Stephen Bonner

Vancouver

Edited by SBonner (log)

"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ahh, chef koo...

australian rieslings have more in common with say, dry aromatics than the light young semi-effervescent bottlings of late harvested fruit that you might be thinking of....

Clare Valley rieslings you definitely must try.

in my book, Aussie riesling goes well with most Asian flavours, including curries!!

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you guys do'nt think the riesling would be too sweet for beef?

Chef Koo,

A good Australian Riesling is much drier than what you are use to from B.C., Germany, or Washington State. They have concentration, great racy acidity, and intense flavour profiles along with more alcohol than their counterparts produced elsewhere.

Give it a try!

Cheers,

Stephen

Vancouver

Edited by SBonner (log)

"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i feel like im taking crazy pills!@

BEEF stew. STEWED. BEEF. who cares if theres lemongrass/ginger/garlic/scallion/whatever.

syrah/shiraz.

rioja

amarone

aglianico

how bout a hermitage or croze hermitage or cote rotie?

or an australian shiraz.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beer. Seriously.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Grenache.  Either Cotes du Rhone or Chateauneuf-du-Pape that's tilted toward more grenache in the blend.

I agree with Brad, but the Rosemont GSM would be a good match too.

Two Hands Lucky Country GSM is really good too.

Or a nice Spanish Garnacha, perhaps.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The REAL question is...stewed in WHAT? Beef stock? Red wine? White wine? Fruit juice? Notwithstanding the known - i.e. the beef and the lemongrass, flavours imparted by the liquids and seasonings are the key here.

Gewurz? Dammit...I've tried SOOOO hard to love gewurz as a match with food, but I find - almost invariably - that most Gewurz-es are too floral and often lack the acidity needed to pair decently with the vast majority of dishes. Once again, depending upon the stock and seasonings, I would be inclined to go with an old-world red. Moulin-a-Vent (arguably the "best" Beaujolais-Villages) - especially Chateau des Jacques from Jadot; a middle-rank Corbieres or Minervois; Pugliese Primitivo or a good Rioja Crianza definitely come to mind. Avoid oaky or overly tannic wines - younger is probably better here.

Having said that, my preference is always to have at least 3 different wines in front of me at all times - now THAT is the way to eat. And to drink.

Happy Easter and Pesach to all!

's'about the wine...or the food, no - the wine...maybe the food...definitely the wine...but it has to be the food...oh, stop whining! Aarrghh!!!

Winefellow - Proprietor, Kenaston Wine Market. Winnipeg, Canada

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...